Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Floyd or search for Floyd in all documents.

Your search returned 23 results in 8 document sections:

Treatment of Wounded Soldiers by Floyd.--The Western Virginia correspondent of the Cincinnati Gazette relates the following: A case of rebel atrocity in the treatment of our prisoners has recently come to light, which gives us new ideas of Virginia barbarism. One of the Seventh Ohio prisoners taken by Floyd at the Cross Lanes fiasco, was slightly wounded in the calf of the leg. The wound did not impair the use of the leg. He could even walk upon it; and all that was needed was to have thnd properly cleansed and dressed and it would speedily have healed. That young man's leg was amputated above the knee by Floyd's surgeon! The prisoner remonstrated and resisted, the surgeon hesitated, and Floyd himself commanded him to go on with tFloyd himself commanded him to go on with the operation! I have heard of similar cases at Richmond, but have never believed that civilized beings in a Christian land could become such utter savages. Of this case, however, there can be no doubt. The young man's amputated leg shows for itse
urse to be pursued with the garrison at Fort Sumter were discussed, Floyd and Thompson dwelling upon the irritation of the Southern heart, andent, urging the immediate reinforcement of Sumter, while Thompson, Floyd, and Thomas contended that a quasi-treaty had been made by the office to their violations of law and seizures of Government property. Floyd especially blazed with indignation at what he termed the violation lied the President, were surprised and enraged to be thus rebuked. Floyd and Thompson sprang to their feet with fierce, menacing gestures, shat was the last Cabinet meeting on that exciting question in which Floyd participated. Before another was called, all Washington was startlame; the door opened, his resignation was thrust into the room, and Floyd disappeared from Washington. Such was the end of Floyd and the beg the room, and Floyd disappeared from Washington. Such was the end of Floyd and the beginning of Stanton. St. Louis Republican, Jan. 20.
est! Joy to each valiant breast! Three days of steady fight-- Three shades of stormy night-- Donelson tumbles. Surrender out of hand! “Unchivalrous demand!” (So Buckner grumbles.) March in, stout Grant and Smith, (Ah! souls of pluck and pith,) Haul down, for the Old Flag, That black and bloody.rag-- Twelve thousand in a bag! True hearts are overjoyed-- But half as many scamper, (Ah! there's the only damper,) Through the very worst of weathers, After old Fuss-and-Feathers And foul Barabbas-Floyd. Was't funk that made them flee? Nay, they're as bold as we-- 'Twas their bad cause, d'ye see, Whereof they well were knowing, (For all their brag and blowing, Their cussing and their crowing,) That is what cowed 'em! Keep the Old Flag agoing-- Crowd 'em, boys, crowd 'em! When roll our ranks afresh Right into foul Secesh? Ah! 'twould be tellina-- Stay — was that thunder? No — stand from under! Hark to McClellan! No more palaver! Speeches an't glory; Sink whig and tory! Rifle clean, bayonet
74. Epigram on Floyd. The thief is a coward by nature's law; Who betrays the state to no one is true; And the brave foe at Fort Donelson saw Their light-fingered Floyd was light-footed too! J. A. 74. Epigram on Floyd. The thief is a coward by nature's law; Who betrays the state to no one is true; And the brave foe at Fort Donelson saw Their light-fingered Floyd was light-footed too! J. A.
ows' and the orphans' tears, Shed for the slain to-day: The blood of all those gallant braves, Whom Southern traitors slew, Cry sternly, from their loyal graves, For vengeance upon you; And, if you're not prepared to die The death of Haman, fly, Jeff — fly! Fly, traitor, to some lonely niche, Far, far beyond the billow; Thy grave an ill-constructed ditch-- Thy sexton General Pillow. There may you turn to rottenness, By mortal unannoyed, Your ashes undisturbed, unless Your grave is known to Floyd. He'll surely trouble your repose, And come to steal your burial-clothes. Epitaph. Pause for an instant, loyal reader. Here lies Jeff, the great seceder. Above, he always lied, you know, And now the traitor lies below. His bow was furnished with two strings, He flattered crowds and fawned on kings; Repaid his country's care with evil, And prayed to God, and served the devil. The South could whip the Yankee nation, So he proposed humiliation! Their blessings were so everlasting, 'Twas ju
89. Escape of Floyd; or, the fall of Fort Donelson. by Sergeant Ed. C. Clark, Thirty-Second regiment, N. Y. S. V. Off Donelson, when the sun was low, Were gunboats running to and fro, Preparing fast to strike the blow That ended so triumphantlys the carnage raging, Plainly told the war was waging-- Still we were the foe engaging, McClernand fighting manfully. If Floyd and Pillow did but know The power of their determined foe, To whom we all great praise bestow, For whipping them so shamefully! Bravely fought that little fleet, Till the distant tramp of many feet Convinced them of the foe's retreat, And Floyd was trembling violently! “Pillow,” says he, “what shall we do? My legs to me have yet been true, And I can run as fast as The guard had come, five thousand strong, And far ahead of the cowardly throng, More spurs than oats to hurry him along, Floyd was flying rapidly! The traitor now is out of reach, But if in our plans there is no breech, We soon will make the rasca<
General Floyd.--This brave and gallant man, after his brilliant but unsuccessful defence of Fort Donelson, retreated with a portion of his brigade to Nashville. Upon his arrival in that place, he was enthusiastically welcomed by the citizens, and in response to the calls of an immense crowd who visited him at his quarters, spoke as follows: This, said Gen. F., is not the time for speaking, but for action. It was time for every man now that loved his country to enlist in the army and for the war. Not a day ought to be lost. He spoke feelingly of the fight at Fort Donelson, where only ten thousand effective men fought for four days and nights against a force of forty thousand of the enemy. But nature could not hold out any longer — men required rest, and after having lost over one third of his gallant force he was compelled to retire, not, however, without leaving over one thousand dead of the enemy on the field. He spoke in high terms of Gen. Sidney Johnston, whom he said had
Floyd.--Capt. Villiam Brown Eskerrie, in the New-York Mercury, thus brings alliteration's artful aid to the immortality of Floyd in verse: Felonious Floyd, far-famed for falsifying, Forever first from Federal forces flying, From fabrications fanning fortune's fame, Finds foul fugacity factitious fame. Fool! facile fabler! fugFloyd in verse: Felonious Floyd, far-famed for falsifying, Forever first from Federal forces flying, From fabrications fanning fortune's fame, Finds foul fugacity factitious fame. Fool! facile fabler! fugitive flagitious! Fear for futurity, filcher fictitious I Fame forced from folly, finding fawners fled, Feeds final failure — failure fungus-fed. onious Floyd, far-famed for falsifying, Forever first from Federal forces flying, From fabrications fanning fortune's fame, Finds foul fugacity factitious fame. Fool! facile fabler! fugitive flagitious! Fear for futurity, filcher fictitious I Fame forced from folly, finding fawners fled, Feeds final failure — failure fungus-f