Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 15, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Floyd or search for Floyd in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 5 document sections:

Arrival of prisoners. --The Danville train yesterday brought in 45 prisoners, in custody of Captain Phelps, of Floyd's cavalry, and a guard of eleven men. These prisoners are all Virginia Unionists, except two Ohio soldiers. They were captured by our cavalry in Wayne, Kanawha, Boone, and Raleigh counties, on the 24th of October, while they were holding an election under the bogus Government of Wheeling. The poll-books, lists of voters, &c., were also secured. The whole number of prisoners taken was 58, of whom 8 were shot as deserters from our camps, and five others, who had taken the oath of allegiance to the Confederacy, and were found with poll-books in their hands, were left behind to be tried for treason. As a general thing, this party have a more respectable appearance than the majority of their stripe now in our prisons, but there are some hard looking customers amongst them.
ency, to the effect that a number of the bridge burners from East Tennessee had been brought in as prisoners on the Tennessee train, but, after careful inquiry, it was soon ascertained thet the prisoners in question were Union men, sent down by Gen. Floyd.--A number of persons gathered around the coach which contained the misguided men, and indulged freely in conversation with them. Every one with whom I conversed expressed strong sympathy with the South, and seemed to regard his being under arern man as ever lived. Most of them had the appearance of respectable farmers, who had been accustomed to labor, and were about such a looking crowd as may be seen at any county Court-House in Virginia. They were in charge of Captain Phelps, of Floyd's brigade; were captured in Kanawha, Roane, Wyoming, Fayette, and Raleigh counties. Most were taken on election day, together with poll-books, which are also in charge of Capt. Phelps. The names of many of them are entered in these books, which
From the army of the Kanawha. --The Norfolk Day Book, of yesterday, publishes the following extract of a letter received in that city: Raleigh C. H., Va., Nov. 4th, 1861. I have just returned from another scout which proved successful to us. We killed several of the enemy, and took 15 prisoners, with many valuable horses. We visited several Union houses during the scout, and I laid in a large stock of bed quilts, woolen counterpanes, blankets, and other necessary articles. I will not suffer for bed-clothing during the winter. I think that our whole force will be in Charleston in a week or two. I understand that Floyd killed and captured about 1,000 Yankees on yesterday — a pretty good haul for this late season.
The recent Affair at Gauley Bridge. It is believed at headquarters here that the reports hither to received in regard to the battle between Gen. Rosencranz and Floyd are exaggerations. It appears that Floyd was firing for twelve hours upon Rosencranz's camp without injuring a single man. There has, however, been no contradictiFloyd was firing for twelve hours upon Rosencranz's camp without injuring a single man. There has, however, been no contradiction of the report that Generals Benham and Schenck had gone to the rear of Floyd's army and hemmed it in. Affairs at Hatteras Inlet — the Federals compelled to abandon the Fort. Col. Hawkins, commander at Fort Hatteras, arrived here to-day. He represents that the exposed position of the fort renders it almost unpatentable Floyd's army and hemmed it in. Affairs at Hatteras Inlet — the Federals compelled to abandon the Fort. Col. Hawkins, commander at Fort Hatteras, arrived here to-day. He represents that the exposed position of the fort renders it almost unpatentable during such storms as that which recently swept the coast. He asks that the troops there may be sent back to Fortress Monroe, or the works be put in a condition to afford safety from the overflows upon such occasions. A portion of the fort and the frame sheds erected for the protection of the troops and stores were washed away, a
rs that such movements have been calculated for and desired by the enemy. Federal report of Floyd's attack on Rosencranz. Capt. C. M. Goulding, Quartermaster in Rosencranz's army, arrived atect from Western Virginia. He gives the latest account of the late fight between Rosencranz and Floyd. We copy from the Cincinnati Commercial: On Friday morning, at 8 o'clock, the rebels openeder the that the force exceeded four thousand. The impression prevailed among our forces that Floyd was personally desperate, and determined to do something that would relieve him from the taunts e by General Rosencranz, and certain preparations going on, that an attempt would be made to bag Floyd's whole forces by Schenck's brigade crossing New River above, and Benham crossing the Kanawha beo make heavy purchases of horse feed. Not the slightest uneasiness was felt as to the ability of the army to sustain itself. The only question was as to whether it could take Floyd and his army.