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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 106 2 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 101 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 96 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 82 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 70 0 Browse Search
James Buchanan, Buchanan's administration on the eve of the rebellion 60 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 59 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 56 2 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 44 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 44 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 25, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for John B. Floyd or search for John B. Floyd in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 4 document sections:

on and draw his supplies from the Secessionists rather than transport them 150 miles in wagons over bad roads! These things should be well considered, and it were well if they were considered before it be too late. It will not do to rely upon Gen. Floyd, and he on the south side of New river or the Kanawha. Three hundred men at Bowyer's, Richmond's, Pack's, or any other Ferry, with one or two pieces of artillery, might hold him in check, while Rosencranz, with the main body of his army, could move forward unresisted. Nor would it be good policy in Floyd to go into the Kanawha valley with a force of less than 20,000 men, leaving Rosencranz in his rear, and the Kanawha river in fine boating condition, by means of which any quantity of Ohio troops might be sent up in front in a few hours. The great need of Western Virginia is troops, and if over the Pierpont Government is to be overthrown, we must have them. We need 25,000 effective men in the direction of Cheat Mountain, and 2
The Daily Dispatch: November 25, 1861., [Electronic resource], Proclamation of General Dix to the people of Accomac and Northampton counties. (search)
Movable State force. --The admirable recommendation of the Governor of Tennessee for a State defensive force, which can be transferred from point to point as it may be required, is especially worthy of adoption in Virginia. The Confederate Government can not be expected to defend every vulnerable point of attack in this State. If Virginia had now a State force of say ten thousand men, she could immediately sustain General Floyd, or stable Gen. Jackson to clear out the whole of the Northwest. Or she might send a portion of it to such points of the Southwest as are menaced. These illustrations will suffice to suggest the great practical benefits which would follow the adoption of such a measure.
he South, which he commanded, and while in service contracted the disease which resulted in his death. Capt. Wm. B. Isler, wounded at the battle of Belmont, Mo., died at Columbus, Ky., on the 10th inst. Captain I. was formerly from New Orleans, and at the time of his death part owner of the Columbus (Ky. ) Confederate News. Hensley S, Bingham, United States Senator from Michigan, died of apoplexy at his residence at Green Oak, on the 5th inst., in his 53d year. The sick of General Floyd's brigade, recently at Raleigh Court-House, have been removed to Mercer Court-House. It is rumored that the brigade is likely to winter at Newbern. A private letter from Col. S. Borland to the little Rock Gazette states that he has not been promoted to the position of Brigadier General. The "Trout House," of Atlanta, Ga., has not been destroyed by fire, as erroneously reported by one of our exchanges. John Sharp, of Paris, Ky., committed suicide by shooting himself, a fe
s, but they may be aware of the fact that the Potomac can be easily blockaded in at least one other quarter. From Gen. Floyd's camp. The following extract of a letter is from a friend in the Floyd Brigade, and exposes another specimen of Ya Col. Wharton returned to them the answer, that he would receive no communication which was not addressed to Brigadier-General John B. Floyd. I am perfectly well, and shall be busily engaged as Judge Advocate in a general court-martial for several ct to have seen anything in regard to it from our own side: On the 9th inst., Col. Clarkson, of the cavalry, from Gen. Floyd's Brigade, marched some two hundred miles to Guyandotte, and completely surprised the Yankee troops in the town, numberen with great cordiality, and gave them a fine supper. They remained until eight o'clock next morning, and returned to Gen. Floyd's camp with all their trophies of victory. The enemy soon after took possession of the town and burnt it. Both officer