hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 106 2 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 101 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 96 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 82 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 70 0 Browse Search
James Buchanan, Buchanan's administration on the eve of the rebellion 60 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 59 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 56 2 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 44 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 44 4 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 1, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for John B. Floyd or search for John B. Floyd in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Address from Gen. Floyd to his army. The following patriotic address has been issued by Gen. Floyd to his army: General order no.-- Headquarters Army of Kanawha, Camp near Dublin Depot, December 26th, 1861. Soldiers of the Army of the Kanawha: The campaign in the Western portion of this State is now, as far Gen. Floyd to his army: General order no.-- Headquarters Army of Kanawha, Camp near Dublin Depot, December 26th, 1861. Soldiers of the Army of the Kanawha: The campaign in the Western portion of this State is now, as far as you are concerned, ended. At its close you can review it with pride and satisfaction. You first encountered the enemy five months since on his unobstructed march into the interior of the State. From that time until recalled from the field, you were engaged in perpetual warfare with him. Hard contested battles and skirmishes ng not only your freedom, your property, and your lives, but the fate of political liberty everywhere. Remembering this and relying upon Him who controls the destinies of nations, as of individuals, you need not fear the result. By order. Brig.-General John B. Floyd. H. B. Davidson, Major and Assistant Adjutant General.
The Daily Dispatch: January 1, 1862., [Electronic resource], How the Yankees stand the climate of South Carolina. (search)
olumbus and Bowling Green; and all the indications pointed with certainly to an immediate advance upon our lines; at a time when we were weak, and were poorly able to withstand assault from heavy columns. Zollicoffer was pressed before Cumberland Gap by a force more than double his own; Pound Gap was at the mercy of Nelson, having only a thousand men to oppose against ten thousand; Rosencranz was on the Gauley with an army which he now confesses to have been fifteen thousand strong, against Floyd, having only twenty-three hundred, Reynolds was on Cheat Mountain with five thousand, opposed by Johnson with only twelve or fourteen hundred; and Sherman had succeeded in landing fifteen or twenty thousand men at Beaufort, while we had in that region at the time but a few thousand forces, little better than militia, poorly provided with arms and ammunition. And to crown all, the splendid weather invited them to the charge. Then was presented the golden opportunity to strike at every o