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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 106 2 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 101 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 96 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 82 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 70 0 Browse Search
James Buchanan, Buchanan's administration on the eve of the rebellion 60 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 59 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 56 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 44 4 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 44 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 24, 1865., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for John B. Floyd or search for John B. Floyd in all documents.

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At the beginning of this contest, there was one statesman of the South, now in his grave, who stood alone in the Confederacy, and we may almost say the continent, in his opinion of the probability of English intervention. This was the late John B. Floyd. He maintained, with distinctness and emphasis, that it was not merely the disruption of the old Union which England sought, but the material ruin of the two belligerents, in order that she might relieve herself of the commercial rivalry of to herself for not only the manufacture but the production of her own staple — an inferior kind, it is true, but still the best (Southern cotton out of the way) they could get. We well recollect the incredulity with which these views of Governor Floyd were generally received, and yet time has set the seal of truth to every word he uttered, and added another to the many illustrations his life afforded of statesmanlike sagacity. It only needed the application to the probable policy of Engla