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in the duties of his corps on Sunday, was placed by me on Monday in command of a battalion without field-officers. Captain Fremeaux, provisional engineers, and Lieutenants Steel and Helm, also rendered material and ever-dangerous service in the line of their duty. Major-General (now General) Braxton Bragg, in addition to his duties of chief of staff, as has been before stated, commanded his corps-much the largest in the field — on both days with signal capacity and soldiership. Surgeon Foard, medical director; Surgeons R. L. Brodie and S. Chopin, medical inspectors; and Surgeon D. W. Yandell, medical director of the Western Department, with General Johnston, were present in the discharge of their arduous and high duties, which they performed with honor to their profession. Captain Tom Saunders, Messrs. Scales and Metcalf, and Mr. Tully, of New Orleans, were of material aid on both days; ready to give news of the enemy's positions and movements, regardless of exposure.
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 14: the greatest battles of the war — list of victories and defeats — chronological list of battles with loss in each, Union and Confederate. (search)
ay 7-20 Rocky Face Ridge; Resaca Atlanta Campaign. 444 2,828 As stated by Dr. Foard, Medical Director of Johnston's (and Hood's) Army, and does not include the mve losses. 3,272 May 20 New Hope Church; Dallas 309 1,921 As stated by Dr. Foard, Medical Director of Johnston's (and Hood's) Army, and does not include the mlosses. 2,230 June 4 June 4 Kenesaw Mountain 468 3,480 As stated by Dr. Foard, Medical Director of Johnston's (and Hood's) Army, and does not include the m July 4 July 4-31 Peach Tree Creek; Atlanta 1,341 7,500 As stated by Dr. Foard, Medical Director of Johnston's (and Hood's) Army, and does not include the move losses. 8,841 July 31 Utoy Creek; Jonesboro 482 3,223 As stated by Dr. Foard, Medical Director of Johnston's (and Hood's) Army, and does not include the mses. 3,705 Sept. 1 May 6-31 Cavalry Engagements 73 341 As stated by Dr. Foard, Medical Director of Johnston's (and Hood's) Army, and does not include the m
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 17 (search)
on on the 1st of May, 1864 (page 302), as follows: Infantry37,652 Artillery2,812 Cavalry2,392   Total42,856 During May, and prior to reaching Cassville, he was further reenforced (page 352): Polk's corps of three divisions12,000 Martin's division of cavalry3,500 Jackson's division of cavalry3,900 And at New Iope Church, May 26th: Brigade of Quarles2,200     Grand total64,456 His losses during the month of May are stated by him, as taken from the report of Surgeon Foard (page 325): from Dalton to Cassville. Corps.Killed.Wounded.Total. Hardee's116850966 Hood's2831,5641,847 Polk's46529575 Total4452,9433,388 at New Hope Church (Page 335.) Corps.Killed.Wounded.Total. Hardee's1568791,035 Hood's103756859 Polk's1794111 Total2761,7292,005 Total killed and wounded during May7214,6725,393 These figures include only the killed and wounded, whereas my statement of losses embraces the missing, which are usually prisoners, and of these we
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, Chapter 16: Atlanta campaign-battles about Kenesaw Mountain. June, 1864. (search)
Army of the Cumberland1,2774,2545,531 Army of the Tennessee. Corps.Killed and Missing.Wounded.Total. Fifteenth (Logan)179687866 Sixteenth (Dodge)52157209 Seventeenth (Blair)47212259 Total, Army of the Tennessee2781,0561,334 Army of the Ohio. Corps.Killed and Missing.Wounded.Total. Twenty-third (Schofield)105362467 Cavalry13068198 Total, Army of the Ohio235430665 Loss in June, aggregate1,7905,7407,530 Johnston makes his statement of losses from the report of his surgeon Foard, for pretty much the same period, viz., from June 4th to July 4th (page 576): Corps.Killed.Wounded.Total. Hardee's2001,4331,633 Hood's1401,1211,261 Polk's1289261,054 Total4683,4803,948 In the tabular statement the missing embraces the prisoners; and, giving two thousand as a fair proportion of prisoners captured by us for the month of June (twelve thousand nine hundred and eighty-three in all the campaign), makes an aggregate loss in the rebel army of fifty-nine hundred and
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 19 (search)
been one of constant conflict, without intermission, and on four several occasions — viz., July 4th, 20th, 22d, and 28th--these affairs had amounted to real battles, with casualty lists by the thousands. Assuming the correctness of the rebel surgeon Foard's report, on page 577 of Johnston's Narrative, commencing with July 4th and terminating with July 31st, we have: Corps.Killed.Wounded.Total. Hardee's5232,7743,297 Lee's3512,4082,759 Stewart's4362,1412,577 Wheeler's Cavalry29156185 Ennteenth Corps, on the 22d of July, and does not embrace the losses in the cavalry divisions of Garrard and McCook, which, however, were small for July. In all other respects the statement is absolutely correct. I am satisfied, however, that Surgeon Foard could not have been in possession of data sufficiently accurate to enable him to report the losses in actual battle of men who never saw the hospital. During the whole campaign I had rendered to me tri-monthly statements of effective strengt
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 20 (search)
army during the entire campaign, from May to September, inclusive, we have, in the Union army, as per table appended: Killed4,423 Wounded22,822 Missing4,442   Aggregate loss31,687 In the Southern army, according to the reports of Surgeon Foard (pp. 576, 577, Johnston's Narrative ): Killed (Johnston)1,221 Killed (Hood)1,823   Total killed3,044 Wounded (Johnston)8,229 Wounded (Hood)10,723   Total killed and wounded21,996 Add prisoners captured by us, and officially reporte army34,979 The foregoing figures are official, and are very nearly correct. I see no room for error save in the cavalry, which was very much scattered, and whose reports are much less reliable than of the infantry and artillery; but as Surgeon Foard's tables do not embrace Wheeler's, Jackson's, and Martin's divisions of cavalry, I infer that the comparison, as to cavalry losses, is a stand-off. I have no doubt that the Southern officers flattered them-selves that they had killed a
ed in the duties of his corps on Sunday, was placed by me, on Monday, in command of a battalion without field officers. Captain Fremeaux, Provisional Engineer, and Lieutenants Steel and Helm, also rendered material and even dangerous service in the line of their duty. Major-General (now General) Braxton Bragg, in addition to his duties as Chief of Staff, as has been before stated, commanded his corps, much the largest in the field, on both days, with signal capacity and soldiership. Surgeon Foard, Medical Director, Surgeon R. L. Brodie, and Surgeon D. W. Tandal, Medical Director of the Western Department, with General Johnston, were present in the discharge of their arduous and high duties, which they performed with honor to their profession. Captain Thomas Saunders, Messrs. Scales and Medcalf, and Mr. Tully of New Orleans, were of material aid on both days, ready to give news of the enemy's positions and movements, regardless of exposure. While thus partially making mention
as composed of three brigades: Butler's, commanded by Col. J. B. Gordon of the First North Carolina; Jones' brigade, and Baker's North Carolina brigade (afterward Gordon's), commanded by Colonel Ferebee of the Fourth North Carolina. This brigade included these regiments: The First, Second, Fourth and Fifth. As the Confederates moved up the Madison pike toward Gordonsville, the First North Carolina regiment in advance encountered Davies' dismounted skirmishers posted in some pines. Lieutenant Foard, of the advance guard, bravely charged in to ascertain the forces of the enemy, and, on his report, the First regiment was soon dismounted, and sharpshooters from every company engaged, Major Cheek commanding in front. The fire from the Federal sharpshooters was very accurate, and Capt. A. B. Andrews, while gallantly performing his duty, was shot through the body, and many others were shot down. The action then became more general. Colonel Ferebee, with a mixed force, charged through
d in the duties of his corps on Sunday, was placed by me on Monday in command of a battalion without field officers.--Captain Fremeaux, Provisional Engineers, and Lieuts. Steel and Helm also rendered material and ever dangerous service in the line of their duty. Major General (now General) Braxton Bragg, in addition to his duties of Chief of Staff, as has been before stated, commanded his corps — much the larges, in the field — on both days with signal capacity and soldiership. Surgeon Foard, Medical Director, Surgeons R. L. Brodie and S. Choppin, Medical Inspectors, and Surgeon D. W. Yandell, Medical Director of the Western Department, with General Johnston, were present in the discharge of their arduous and high duties, which they performed with honor to their profession. Capt. Tom Saunders, Messrs. Scales and Metcalf, and Mr. Tully, of New Orleans, were of material aid on both days, ready to give news of the enemy's positions and movements regardless of exposure.
Released. --Rev. Drs. Baldwin and Foard, who were confined at Camp Chase, by order of Andy Johnson, have been released on parole, and have returned to Nashville. Dr. Elliott is still in Andy's bastille. It is stated that there was very urgent necessity for the presence of Drs. Baldwin and Foard to be with their families, and their release was asked and granted on that ground; but that such circumstances did not exist in the case of Dr. Elliott. These ministers are released without any o were confined at Camp Chase, by order of Andy Johnson, have been released on parole, and have returned to Nashville. Dr. Elliott is still in Andy's bastille. It is stated that there was very urgent necessity for the presence of Drs. Baldwin and Foard to be with their families, and their release was asked and granted on that ground; but that such circumstances did not exist in the case of Dr. Elliott. These ministers are released without any concessions to the usurper, save being paroled.