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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 42 6 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 26 4 Browse Search
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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 13: England.—June, 1838, to March, 1839.—Age, 27-28. (search)
ter, Salisbury, Exeter, and Bodmin in Cornwall, where the Western Circuit was then in session, and where, with Wilde and Follett, he was the guest of the bar; then to Plymouth in the carriage of Crowder, Queen's counsel, afterwards judge; to Combe Fe familiarity of a kinsman, into the houses of Denman, Vaughan, Parke, Alderson, Langdale, and Coltman, among judges; of Follett, Rolfe (Lord Cranworth), Wilde, Crowder, Lushington, and D'Oyly, among lawyers; of Hayward, Adolphus, Clark, Bingham, Wid constant communion with the various gifted minds that I nightly meet; to listen daily to the arguments of Talfourd and Follett: and so, indeed, should I rejoice in more ennobling society still,—to walk with Cicero over Elysian fields, and listen tthe bar; where sits Denman, in manner, conduct, and character every inch the judge; where pleaded the consummate lawyer, Follett, whose voice is now hushed in the grave;--their judgments, their arguments, their conversation I cannot forget:. but thi
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 14: first weeks in London.—June and July, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
. Sir John Campbell, the Solicitor-General, Rolfe. and Follett, all spoke; and of these Follett was by far the best. O'CFollett was by far the best. O'Connell spoke several times, but only long enough to give me a taste of his voice, which is rich in the extreme, more copious expressed all that is in my mind. I have heard Campbell, Follett (the best of all), Talfourd (I dine with him next Sunday), Attorney, the Solicitor, Sir Frederick Pollock, and Sir William Follett. I sat between Follett and Pollock. To the first IFollett and Pollock. To the first I talked about law, and his cases; to the latter, about Horace, and Juvenal, and Persius, and the beauty of the English language. Pollock is a delightful scholar: Follett is a delightful man,—simple, amiable, unaffected as a child. Said Follett: I Follett: I have often cited, before the House of Lords, the work of one of your countrymen,—Dr. Story; and he inundated me with question of locofoco, and I defined it to be a very ultra Radical, Follett and Pollock both laughed, and cried out to the Attorney: C
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 15: the Circuits.—Visits in England and Scotland.—August to October, 1838.—age, 27. (search)
whom history has said nothing; then to Exeter, and down even to Bodmin in Cornwall, where the Assizes of the Western Circuit were held. Serjeant Wilde and Sir William Follett were there, having gone down special, not being regularly of the circuit; and we three formed the guests of the bar. Our healths were drunk, and I was callegraph: it is quite odd. Such is a mere skeleton of my progress. It were vain for me to attempt to record all the kindness and hospitality I have received. Sir William Follett has extended the hand of friendship to me in a most generous way. His reputation in the profession is truly colossal, second only to that of Lord Mansfield;great man. When I asked who at the bar now was most like him, he said: Nobody: there is a degenerate race now; there are no good speakers at the bar, except Sir William Follett and Mr. Pemberton. He spoke of Lord Langdale as a person who had never done any thing, and who never would do any thing, and who was an ordinary man. He sa
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
ware of any authorities or discussions in the United States which would reflect light upon the question. . . . Sir William Follett's grand reputation you well know. If the Tories should come into power, and he would accept the place, I think itfrom the slight fact that they address me without any prefix, as Sumner; and I, of course, do the same with them. Sir William Follett always meets me on that footing. It was only night before last that I dined at his house. We had at table Sir Frerior to Sydney Smith, whose humor makes your sides shake with laughter for weeks after you have listened to it. We left Follett at about half-past 11 o'clock; and Talfourd carried me to the Garrick, where we found Poole. Talfourd took his two glaseness he was unable to walk. He is fond of Shakspeare, and often have we interchanged notes during a long argument from Follett or Wilde (while I was sitting by the side of the latter in the Serjeants' row), the burden of which has been some turn o
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
ld. Talfourd's first acquaintance with Sir William Follett was while the latter was a student, or e morning from the watchman, who had arrested Follett in the act of scaling the walls of the Temples Austin. He is a more animated speaker than Follett,—perhaps not so smooth and gentle; neither is is powerful here, and is immeasurably before Follett in accomplishments and liberality of view. H many civilities from him in London. Sir William FollettAnte, Vol. I. p. 332. is truly a lovablns, where I have heard them call for Follett, Follett! and here he shows a parliamentary eloquencell, and I cannot hesitate to place him before Follett. In my next I shall continue my sketch of thve, and brilliant, does not astonish one like Follett. I still think Austin, taking all things int have already spoken of the Attorney-General, Follett, Wilde, and Charles Austin. In the next rankhelor and a Tory. In manner he is not unlike Follett. He is about forty-five. In person he is ra[6 more...]
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, London, Jan. 12. (search)
ouse, but made himself her keeper, and lived with her, retired from the world. Talfourd's first acquaintance with Sir William Follett was while the latter was a student, or just after his call to the bar, in getting him released one morning from the watchman, who had arrested Follett in the act of scaling the walls of the Temple. At Lord Durham's John George Lambton, 1792-1840. He became Baron Durham in 1828, and Earl of Durham in 1833. He was sent on a special mission to Russia in 1833ockings he ever saw! I do not know if I have ever written you about Charles Austin. He is a more animated speaker than Follett,—perhaps not so smooth and gentle; neither is he, I think, so ready and instinctively sagacious in a law argument: and yy and instinctively sagacious in a law argument: and yet he is powerful here, and is immeasurably before Follett in accomplishments and liberality of view. He is a fine scholar, and deeply versed in English literature and the British Constitution