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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for S. T. Fontaine or search for S. T. Fontaine in all documents.

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m, major. Thirty-sixth cavalry regiment, P. C. Woods, colonel; Nat Benton, lieutenant-colonel; W. O. Hutchinson, major. There were on the Rio Grande, and at different points on the coast, artillery as follows: Maj. D. D. Shea's two companies at Lavaca. Capt. R. B. Machlin's light battery on the Rio Grande. Capt. H. Wilkes' light battery at Corpus Christi. Capt. B. F. Neal's company heavy artillery at Corpus Christi. Capt. Krumbhoar's battery, mountain howitzers on Rio Grande. Captain Fontaine's light artillery, Houston. Colonel Cook's regiment heavy artillery, Hawe's heavy artillery, sapper's and miner's, Mosely's light artillery, Abbott's light artillery, at Galveston. O. G. Jones' battery, Sabine Pass. Hughes' battery, Sabine Pass. Fox's battery at Galveston. Dashiel's battery at Houston. Capt. W. H. Nichols' battery at Camp McNeill. The companies of light artillery were moved from place to place where their services were required at different times. The followin
ssels inside of the harbor. The attack from this point was intrusted to Capt. S. T. Fontaine, of Cook's regiment of artillery, supported by six companies of Pyron's anister. After allowing the lapse of what turned out to be ample time for Captain Fontaine to reach and occupy his more distant position, the guns were placed along could be continued on the adversary with greater advantage to us. Knowing Captain Fontaine to be in a position the most exposed of all, I at the same time dispatchedth instructions to have his pieces likewise withdrawn. This order reached Captain Fontaine's men before it was received by the captain, and the concentrated fire fro were compelled to leave their pieces. They were, however, soon formed by Captain Fontaine in a position of greater security. The delicate duty of withdrawing theScurry, Col. X. B. Debray, Major Von Harten, Cook's regiment of artillery; Captain Fontaine, Cook's regiment; Maj. J. Kellersberg of the engineer corps; also to Colon