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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 25 1 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 11 1 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 8: the siege and capture of Fort Donelson. (search)
march across Tennessee and penetrate Alabama. Foote had already hurried back to Cairo with the Cinhom he was descended He was a son of Senator Samuel Foote, of Connecticut, whose resolution concearance of their pastor at the proper time, and Foote was invited to conduct the religious services f that post and Fort Henry. At the same time, Foote was moving up the Cumberland with his gun-boat whole were under the personal command of Commodore Foote, who had not been able to get his mortar-erilous became the condition of them all, that Foote ordered them to withdraw. Then the fugitives ation with General Grant and his own officers, Foote set out for Cairo, for the purpose of having the siege with greater vigor. Report of Commodore Foote to the Secretary of the Navy, on board hind on the defensive, until re-enforcements and Foote's flotilla should arrive. His words were few,or. He then spoke of the good conduct of Commodore Foote, and announced the fact that, notwithstan[3 more...]
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe, Chapter 2: school days in Hartford, 1824-1832. (search)
d his pastorate in Litchfield to accept a call to the Hanover Street Church, Boston, Mass. In a letter to her grandmother Foote at Guilford, dated Hartford, March 4, 1826, Harriet writes:-- You have probably heard that our home in Litchfield ise of mind; consequently in the spring of 1827, accompanied by her friend Georgiana May, she went to visit her grandmother Foote at Nut Plains, Guilford. Miss May refers to this visit in a letter to Mrs. Foote, in January of the following winter. HMrs. Foote, in January of the following winter. Hartford, January 4, 1828. Dear Mrs. Foote:-- . . I very often think of you and the happy hours I passed at your house last spring. It seems as if it were but yesterday: now, while I am writing, I can see your pleasant house and the familiar objeMrs. Foote:-- . . I very often think of you and the happy hours I passed at your house last spring. It seems as if it were but yesterday: now, while I am writing, I can see your pleasant house and the familiar objects around you as distinctly as the day I left them. Harriet and I are very much the same girls we were then. I do not believe we have altered very much, though she is improved in some respects. The August following this visit to Guilford Harri
ey of their proposed battlefield, and their impressions of the city are given in the following letter written by the latter to Harriet in Boston:-- Here we are at last at our journey's end, alive and well. We are staying with Uncle Samuel (Foote), whose establishment I will try and sketch for you. It is on a height in the upper part of the city, and commands a fine view of the whole of the lower town. The city does not impress me as being so very new. It is true everything looks neat aner that from that time on she devoted most of her leisure moments to writing. Her literary efforts were further stimulated at this time by the congenial society of the Semi-Colon Club, a little social circle that met on alternate weeks at Mr. Samuel Foote's and Dr. Drake's. The name of the club originated with a roundabout and rather weak bit of logic set forth by one of its promoters. He said: You know that in Spanish Columbus is called Colon. Now he who discovers a new pleasure is certai