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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for S. E. Foote or search for S. E. Foote in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 37: operations of the East Gulf Squadron to October, 1863. (search)
neers: Chief, Mortimer Kellogg; Assistants, H. S. Davids, H. C. McIlvaine, Edwin Wells, H. W. Scott, Edmund Lincoln and N. P. Towne; Boatswain, John Marley; Acting-Gunner, C. A. Stevenson; Carpenter, R. A. Williams; Sailmaker, J. H. North. Steamer Penguin. Commander, J. C. Williamson; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, G. B. Higginbotham; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, W. C. Cook; Acting-Masters, T. Durham, S. B. Rathbone, G. V. Cassedy and C. H. Rockwell; Acting-Master's Mates, W. E. Anderson, S. E. Foote, W. A. Beattie and W. A. Randlett; Engineers, F. W. Warner, M. P. Randall, A. B. Kinney and John Webster Steam gun-boat Sagamore. Lieutenant-Commander, Earl English; Assistant-Surgeon, W. K. Scofield; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. F. Wood; Acting-Masters, Wm. Fales and Edwin Babson; Acting-Master's Mates, J. A. Slamm, C. R. Fleming, F. E. Ford and G. B. Sidell; Engineers, Henry Snyder, W. H. Harris, F. G. Coggin and G. J. Lamberson. Steam gun-boat Tahoma Lieutenant-Commander,
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 38: review of the work done by the Navy in the year 1863. (search)
els, carrying 452 guns, with crews amounting, in the aggregate, to about 5,500 men. Kentucky, Tennessee and Arkansas, the upper portions of Mississippi and Louisiana, and the southern portions of those States which border on the Ohio River on the north, have been relieved and liberated through the instrumentality of the gun-boats, acting by themselves or in earnest and cordial co-operation with the armies. Rear-Admiral Porter has well sustained the renown which the gallant and lamented Foote so nobly earned, and has carried forward to successful results a larger and more powerful force than was ever at the disposal of that heroic officer. [The Honorable Secretary does not make his meaning quite clear at this point, but it is presumed he wished to be complimentary.] In creating and organizing this squadron, and arming and manning the vessels, it must not be forgotten that the service labored under many and great disadvantages, for the Government had no Navy Yard or establishm