Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for John M. Forbes or search for John M. Forbes in all documents.

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ckly taken up by the related families,—so that through connections by kin or friendship nearly all the society was likely to take a part. For instance, the Ticknor, Eliot, Dwight, Guild, and Norton families were connected by marriage; and Mr. Eliot was a near kinsman of the Curtis family. Similar ties by blood and marriage united the Sears, Mason, Warren, Parker, and Amory families, and also the Shaw, Sturgis, Parkman, and Perkins families. Another group was the Sturgis, Perkins, Cabot, Forbes, Cary, Gardiner, and Cushing families. The different groups were often connected by kin or close friendship. Sumner was for a time, at an earlier period, shut out from one house on Beacon Street merely for complimenting, in a lawyer's office, the editor of a magazine who had reviewed a domestic controversy already before the public in judicial proceedings. The head of the family, learning the circumstance from a relative who, unobserved, was within hearing, shortly after returned a subscri
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
avery question in the present excited state of the public mind but he reconsidered his refusal on the caution being withdrawn. (Works, vol. v. pp. 430-432.) A special police force was on hand to prevent disturbance. It was his first public appearance in that city, and nothing could exceed his welcome as expressed in a packed house and most enthusiastic reception. Among pleasant incidents of the summer and autumn were visits for the day to Mr. and Mrs. Adams at Quincy, and a visit to John M. Forbes at Naushon. Sumner took part in the festivities in honor of the Prince of Wales, who was in Boston in October, being present at the collation at the State House, a musical jubilee at the Music Hall, and a reception at Harvard College, and also being selected by General Bruce as one of the party to accompany the prince to Portland on his day of sailing. Sumner contributed articles to the Boston Transcript, October 15 and 16, on the Duke of Kent's visit to Boston in 1794, and on the Pr