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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 3 3 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Robert B. Forbes or search for Robert B. Forbes in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 16: events at home.—Letters of friends.—December, 1837, to March, 1839.—Age 26-28. (search)
he failure of some Boston banks had spread unusual distrust. Few local improvements were in progress; but it was thought worthy of record at the time that around the Common had been built a sidewalk, which, as a much-frequented promenade, was called The Lovers' Chase. The domestic life of Sumner's friends underwent changes. Cleveland and Felton were now both married. The former was living at Pine Bank, near Jamaica Pond, and the latter in a new house he had built at Cambridge. Captain R. B. Forbes was embarking for China to make another fortune. Hillard met with one of the saddest of bereavements,—the loss of an only child. Young William Story had passed from College to Law School, and was making his first essays in sculpture,—the busts of his father and a classmate. The Five of Clubs, now four only,—Felton, Cleveland, Hillard, Longfellow,—kept up their reunions, always commemorating at firesides and in feasts the loved member whose seat was vacant; and there were many call
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 20: Italy.—May to September, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
n less than seven days. I have ordered my letters to Vienna, where I expect to find a batch of two months. This is a temptation to the North; but there are the Piraeus and Marathon! I am strongly tempted. My next will be to you from Vienna or Athens. Which had you rather it should be? Tell me in your next. I hope you will encourage Felton in his plan of travel. Speed him in every possible way. As ever, affectionately yours, Charles Sumner, P. S. Remember me to Forbes Captain R. B. Forbes, ante, Vol. I. p. 163 when you write him. It is something to send a wish from Venice to Canton vid Boston. It is equal to Pope's Waft a sigh from Indus to the Pole. I have seen every thing in Venice now, and been in a gondola to my heart's content. A little boy asked me the other day if he should not go with me to sing Tasso. The gondoliers are a better set of men than any of the cabmen or hackmen I have had to do with in other places. To Thomas Crawford. Milan, Oct. 5, 183
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
on, which we so much envy you. How is Oscar? We feel sad in dear Longfellow's absence,--facile princeps of American poets, friend of the warm hand and gushing heart. . . . I drove the Lyells out last evening. They sail for Europe in the packet of the 16th. I break off now to mount with Howe to ride with two maidens fair. Ever and ever yours, Charles Sumner. To Hillard, at Troy, N. Y., he wrote, July 15, 1842:— We parted at the foot of Wellington Hills. Sumner and Captain R. B. Forbes escorted Hillard, who was starting on a journey, as far as Belmont Forbes and I—our horses most restive in each other's company—called on Mr. Cushing. On my return to town that evening, I found the Lyells had arrived. The next night I drove them out. They were delighted to see, for the first time, fireflies. I caught several for them in my hat. Wednesday they went to Nahant to dine with Prescott. I was asked, but declined. In the evening I went with Howe to ride with Miss——and