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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 16 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 7 1 Browse Search
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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
a Spaniard who is in England. I shall undoubtedly be able to let you know by my next letter. Mr. Ford, the writer of the Spanish articles in the Quarterly, has undertaken to review Prescott's book w that would best please the author and our country. When he had said this, I knew that he was Mr. Ford. Richard Ford, 1796-1858; author of Handbook for Spain and Gatherings from Spain. He visitell rate his book as high as Watson's Philip, —though you know I place it infinitely before that. Ford promptly said: I place it before Robertson, and I shall say so in my article. He then gave me a Our acquaintance, which commenced in a harsh personal argument, ripened so that I received from Ford a cordial invitation to visit him at his country-place and enjoy his Spanish buildings. Embolden. It contains Ford's written opinion about his book, of which he may well be proud. Since seeing Ford I have met Pascual de Gayangos, He was born at Seville, in 1809; studied in Paris under Silves
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 27, 1839. (search)
II. Lady Holland treated him quite unceremoniously,—according to Macaulay, like a negro slave.—Trevelyan's Life of Macaulay, Vol. I. Chap. IV. Allen was not a believer in the Christian religion, and on this subject gave a tone to the conversation of Holland House.—Greville's Memoirs, Chap. XXX., Dec. 16, 1835. the friend of Lord Holland. Mr. Hallam, however, thought it was not by him, but by a Spaniard who is in England. I shall undoubtedly be able to let you know by my next letter. Mr. Ford, the writer of the Spanish articles in the Quarterly, has undertaken to review Prescott's book for that journal: whether his article will be ready for the next number I cannot tell. Prescott ought to be happy in his honorable fame. His publisher, Bentley, is about to publish a second edition in two volumes; and he told me that he regarded the work as the most important he had ever published, and as one that would carry his humble name to posterity. Think of Bentley astride the shoulders <
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 19: Paris again.—March to April, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
m met a person who interested me more, and whose society I felt more anxious to cultivate. Perhaps I was won by his misfortunes. As we parted,—he treating me with great warmth and attention,—I contented myself with saying, and I could not say less: Monsieur Papineau, je vous souhaite le bonheur.—Ah! he replied, Nous nous verrons encore une fois en Amerique dans les jours qui seront bons et beaux. The last Quarterly Review contains an article on a Spanish subject,— written undoubtedly by Ford, who will review Prescott. Fearing that Ford's high Toryism might be turned against us by recent events, I wrote him yesterday in order to turn aside his wrath, and suggesting to him that the Muse should extend her olive branch, even in this time of semi-strife, between our two countries. I go to Naples as fast as I can go. You will next hear from me lapped in soft Parthenope; and perhaps I may encounter even the August heat of Rome, without, alas! hearing the hoarse verses of Codrus.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 20: Italy.—May to September, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
cles—and in the cabinets or drawing-rooms of the best houses at which I had the honor of being received. From time to time, I have communicated to some of my friends at home a portion of what I heard about it; some of this may have reached you. I cannot refrain now from adding that no literary triumph could be more complete than yours. In the judgment of the best scholars of England, you have taken your place— Con segno di vittoria incoronato at the head of the literature of our country. Ford, to whom you refer in your letter, is a sort of chevalier de la plume, who writes less to do the right than to show his own good mettle. His favorable judgment of an American work I should prize highly, while his unfavorable criticism would not disturb me. He is among the most ultra Tories and absolutists I have ever met, and hates our institutions and our great example. On Spanish subjects, and generally on Continental topics, I thought him acute and well informed, though prejudiced and pe
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 12: (search)
ts bibliographiques qu'il offre en grande quantity, et qui fournissent les materiaux de nombreuses et importantes additions, aux recherches de Brunet, daEbert, et autres savants, verses dans la connaissance des livres. From the Bulletin Belge, article signed G. Brunet. The bibliographical information it contains in great quantities, and which furnishes materials for numerous and important additions to the researches of Brunet, Ébert, and other experts, versed in the history of books. Mr. Richard Ford Author of the Handbook of Spain. He wrote an article on Mr. Ticknor's work in the London Quarterly, and a notice of it also for the London Times. gives him infinite credit for the great number of rare and curious books which he has pointed out, for his careful tracing of their editions, and the exact indications of chapter and verse, on his margin, and, at the same time, adds some words about Mr. Ticknor's gentlemanlike and elegant remarks, couched in a calm tone, and expressed in a
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 16: (search)
th sincere and affectionate interest, asking constantly whether you will not come again soon, to which I always answer in such a way as to put the burthen upon Susan, who, I suppose, will bear it contentedly rather than lose you. I delivered all your letters; most of them, however, I could not find time to deliver until after I had filled up my days with engagements, which we did in about four or five days after our arrival. . . . . The Ellesmeres, the Laboucheres, See Vol. I. p. 408. and Ford have been very kind, and invited us to dine, but we could not accept. I dined at the Duke of Argyll's, with a very brilliant party, and we talked much of you; but Anna was in Kent, on a visit to the Mild mays and Stanhopes, where I was very glad to have her go for refreshment for a few days, and so missed this pleasure. . . . . Macaulay is the lion. He has been asked to meet us seven times, so that it has got to be a sort of joke. But he is very agreeable, not in perfectly good health,
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
recollection of his visit to us in Milan. I was very sorry to part from them. I dined tete-à--tete with Chorley, as I promised . . . . I would the first day I could rescue, and I had a very interesting talk with him till nearly midnight. He is a shy, reserved man, living quite retired with an invalid sister, to whom he seems to devote himself; but he is one of the persons in whose acquaintance I have had most pleasure in London. He is a first-rate Spanish scholar; evidently better than Ford, or anybody else hereabout. Saturday, August 1.—Sixty-six years old, and not half what I ought to be at that age, in goodness, or anything else. I do not like to pass the day away from all of you. . . . . After packing, and arranging for my final departure, I went out this morning to leave my P. P. C's. . . . . At two or three doors I inquired and went in. Sir Francis Beaufort's was one. Of course I did not see Lady Beaufort. Miss Honors Edgeworth. See. Vol. I. p. 427. She keeps her r
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
note, 434, Il 163. Fletcher, Mrs., I. 279 and note, 433, 484, II. 106, 163. Florence, visits, I. 183, II. 48-58, 87-91, 315, 338-40, 350, 351. Flugel, Dr., Felix, II. 313. Follen, Dr., Charles, Professor at Harvard College, I. 351, 352, 368 note. Folsom, Charles, I. 889, 390. Forbes, Captain, I. 262. Forbes, Hon., Francis, I. 458, 459, 461, 463, 477, 478, 486, 489, II. 8, 19, 329. Forbes, Mr., II. 164. Forbes, Sir, Francis, II. 156. Forbin, Count, I. 255, 257. Ford, Richard, II. 255 and note, 256 note, 259, 322, 385. Forster, Hofrath Friedrich, I. 493, 495. Forster, Professor, Karl, I. 475, 482, II. 480 and note. Forti, II. 48, 88. Fossombroni, Count, II. 49. Foster, Sir, Augustus, II. 40, 41. Fox, Colonel C. J. (General), I. 408, II. 370. Fox, Lady, Mary, I. 408, 409. Francisco, Don, Prince of Spain, I. 206. Frankfort-on-Main, visits, I.122. Franklin, Benjamin, I. 286. Franklin, Lady, I. 425. Franklin Public School, Boston, Elis