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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 70 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 30, 1862., [Electronic resource] 9 1 Browse Search
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gallantry, and should be commended. Colonel Thomas Ford. In the case of Col. Ford, charged wsel, find: That on the fifth of September Col. Ford was placed in command of Maryland Heights by Col. Miles. That Col. Ford, finding the position unprepared by fortifications, earnestly urged Con, Colonel Miles said to Col. Ford that he (Colonel Ford) could not have another man, and must do thmission to a consideration of the fact, Did Colonel Ford, under the discretionary power thus vested left without a competent officer in command, Col. Ford himself not appearing nor designating any onapacity. It is clear to the Commission that Col. Ford should not have been placed in command on Mas the key to the position, and yet he places Col. Ford in command with a feeble force, makes no effember there was ample time to do so; and to Colonel Ford's repeated demands for means to intrench anng the key of the position to the keeping of Col. Ford, with discretionary power, after the arrival[8 more...]
sel, find: That on the fifth of September Col. Ford was placed in command of Maryland Heights by Col. Miles. That Col. Ford, finding the position unprepared by fortifications, earnestly urged Coly, when the enemy appeared in heavy force, Colonel Ford frequently and earnestly called upon Col. Mhat as late as the morning of the thirteenth Col. Ford sent two written demands to Col. Miles for rmission to a consideration of the fact, Did Colonel Ford, under the discretionary power thus vested left without a competent officer in command, Col. Ford himself not appearing nor designating any onapacity. It is clear to the Commission that Col. Ford should not have been placed in command on Maember there was ample time to do so; and to Colonel Ford's repeated demands for means to intrench anquate return or no response at all. He gives Col. Ford a discretionary power as to when he shall abxclammation was to the effect that he feared Col. Ford had given up too soon, although he must have[8 more...]
Secretary of State The rebel army at Harper's Perry — a conversation with Jackson. Col. Thomas Ford, ex-Congressional Printer, who with his brigade, was taken prisoner at Harper's Ferry commuon papers the results of his experience there and a conversation with Stonewall Jackson: Colonel Ford says he sat on his horse on Tuesday morning and saw seventy thousand rebel troops march over on as if going to Winchester but marched around and fought McClellan. Gen. Hill apologized to Col. Ford for compelling his brigade to wait until the rebel army had crossed, by saying his men had been without food since the previous Saturday--Col. Ford noticed that of the seventy thousand rebels not one had a canteen, haversack, or cartridge box, and half were without shoes. He exonerates Col. complete trap for any army that should occupy it, and he said he should not attempt to stay. Col. Ford had a conversation of an hour or more with Stonewall Jackson, and he represents that chieftain