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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 14 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 2, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Confederate invasion of New Mexico and Arizona. (search)
command, having abandoned a number of wagons at the camp with their contents, proceeded northerly, passing near the eastern end of the Mesa de la Contedera, and approaching the river again at Valverde. Sibley's command in this region consisted of about two thousand men. Colonel Canby's command consisted of 3810 men, composed of 5 companies of the 5th, 3 of the 7th, and 3 of the 10th Regular Infantry; 2 companies of the 1st and 5 of the 3d Regular Cavalry; McRae's and Hall's batteries; and Ford's company of Colorado Volunteers. The New Mexico troops consisted of Kit Carson's 1st regiment, 7 companies of the 2d, 7 companies of the 3d, 1 of the 4th, 2 of the 5th, Graydon's Spy Company, and some unorganized militia. As the enemy commenced its movements at about 8 o'clock A. M., Colonel Benjamin S. Roberts with the regular and volunteer cavalry, two sections of McRae's (provisional) battery, Hall's section of 24-pounder howitzers, Captain David H. Brotherton's company of the 5th, Capt
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.58 (search)
to crush any force of the enemy that had passed through Thoroughfare Gap, and to interpose between Lee's army and Bull Run. Having the interior line of operations, and the enemy at Manassas being inferior in force, it appeared to me, and still so appears, that with even ordinary promptness and energy we might feel sure of success. In the meantime heavy forces of the enemy still confronted us at Waterloo Bridge, On the afternoon of August 26th, Longstreet's corps moved to Hinson's Mill Ford, six miles above, leaving R. H. Anderson's division (about 6000 effectives) at Waterloo Bridge.--Editors. while his main body continued its march toward our right, following the course of Hedgman's River (the Upper Rappahannock). I accordingly sent orders, early on the 27th of August, to General McDowell to move rapidly on Gainesville by the Warrenton pike with his own corps, reenforced by Reynolds's division and Sigel's corps. I directed Reno, followed by Kearny's division of Heintzelman's
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Jackson's raid around Pope. (search)
him. We know at that time that McClellan was withdrawing from Westover. I was preparing to force a passage at Kelly's Ford, when I received an order from General Lee to proceed to Beverly Ford and mask the movements of Jackson, who was to be sent up the river to cross by a left flank movement. On the 22d Jackson withdrew carefully and went on the proposed move. He sought an opportunity to cross farther up the stream, and succeeded in putting part of his command across at Warrenton Springs Ford and in occupying a position there. The flooding rains interrupted his operations, making the river past fording and crippling all attempts at forcing a passage. Jackson therefore withdrew his forces at night by a temporary bridge. As the lower fords became impassable by reason of the floods, the Federals seemed to concentrate against Jackson's efforts. On the 23d I had quite a spirited artillery combat at Beverly Ford with a force of the enemy that had crossed at the railroad bridge nea
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The surrender of Harper's Ferry. (search)
e of each other in case of assault, nor was either of them properly fortified. On the 13th the divisions of Generals McLaws and R. H. Anderson, by order of General Lee, reached Maryland Heights, and attacked the force stationed there, under Colonel Ford, who after some fighting abandoned the position — as he stated, by order of Colonel Miles; the latter, however, denied having given such an order. Be this as it may, it is certain that the enemy could easily have taken it with the force at hisault within an hour after his arrival before it, or at any time thereafter prior to the surrender, in spite of any resistance which under the circumstances could have been made. The report of the Military Commission censured Colonels Miles and Ford and Major Baird. It affirmed that there was nothing in the conduct of Colonels D'Utassy and Trimble to call for censure; and that General Julius White merited the approbation of the Commission, adding, He appears from the evidence to have acted w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The invasion of Maryland. (search)
ly been in advance, the reconnoissance could have been accomplished with comparative ease. I was a medical officer attached to the infantry, and, acting as an aide for Major Lovell, had opportunity to witness what is here stated. Editors. Proceeding on our march, we went to Bunker Hill, where we remained for several days. A report was made of a Federal advance, but it turned out to be only a party of cavalry and amounted to nothing. As soon as the cavalry Blackford's, or Boteler's, Ford, Prom the Maryland side. From a recent photograph. This picture, taken from the tow-path of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, shows the ford bellow Shepherdstown by which Lee's army retreated after Antietam, the cliff on the Virginia side being the scene of the disaster to the 118th Pennsylvania, or Corn Exchange, regiment. When Porter's corps arrived at the Potomac in pursuit, on September 19th, Confederate artillery on the cliffs disputed the passage. A small Union force, under General G
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
1st Mo., Lieut. Charles Green. Artillery loss: k, 6; w, 29 = 35. Unattached: 14th Mo. (Western Sharp-shooters), Col. Patrick E. Burke. Loss: r, 6; w, 14; m, 3 = 23. Sixth division, Brig.-Gen. Thomas J. McKean. First Brigade, Col. Benjamin Allen, Brig.-Gen. John McArthur: 21st Mo., Col. David Moore, Maj. Edwin Moore; 16th Wis., Maj. Thomas Reynolds; 17th Wis., Col. John L. Doran. Brigade loss: k, 11; w, 67; m, 23 = 101. Second Brigade, Col. John M. Oliver: Indpt. Co.,, Ill. Cav., Capt. William Ford; 15th Mich., Lieut.-Col. John McDermott; 18th Mo. (4 co's), Capt. Jacob R. Ault; 14th Wis., Col. John Hancock; 18th Wis., Col. Gabriel Bouck. Brigade loss: k, 45; w, 108; m, 38 = 191. Third Brigade, Col. Marcellus M. Crocker: 11th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. William Hall; 13th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. John Shane; 15th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. William W. Belknap, Col. Hugh T. Reid; 16th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. Addison H. Sanders (w), Maj. William Purcell. Brigade loss: k, 14; w, 111: m, 24 = 149. Artillery, Capt.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Corinth, Miss., October 3d and 4th, 1862. (search)
1st Mo., Lieut. Charles Green. Artillery loss: k, 6; w, 29 = 35. Unattached: 14th Mo. (Western Sharp-shooters), Col. Patrick E. Burke. Loss: r, 6; w, 14; m, 3 = 23. Sixth division, Brig.-Gen. Thomas J. McKean. First Brigade, Col. Benjamin Allen, Brig.-Gen. John McArthur: 21st Mo., Col. David Moore, Maj. Edwin Moore; 16th Wis., Maj. Thomas Reynolds; 17th Wis., Col. John L. Doran. Brigade loss: k, 11; w, 67; m, 23 = 101. Second Brigade, Col. John M. Oliver: Indpt. Co.,, Ill. Cav., Capt. William Ford; 15th Mich., Lieut.-Col. John McDermott; 18th Mo. (4 co's), Capt. Jacob R. Ault; 14th Wis., Col. John Hancock; 18th Wis., Col. Gabriel Bouck. Brigade loss: k, 45; w, 108; m, 38 = 191. Third Brigade, Col. Marcellus M. Crocker: 11th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. William Hall; 13th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. John Shane; 15th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. William W. Belknap, Col. Hugh T. Reid; 16th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. Addison H. Sanders (w), Maj. William Purcell. Brigade loss: k, 14; w, 111: m, 24 = 149. Artillery, Capt.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Semmes' Georgia Brigade. (search)
ise, Rosieur Larkin, Private Robt. A. Rennoe, Lawrence Weaks. Co. B. Private Thos. E. Clutts, Geo. Fairfax, Private James Pearson, Samuel P. Simpson. Co. C. 4th Sergeant Geo. Grayson, Private B. F. Fletcher, R. W. Herndon, J. P. Manuel, Private P. H. Marsteller, Lycurgus Payne, Jacob Uhlfelder, J. C. Waller. Co. D. 1st Sergeant Jas. O. Harris, 2d Sergeant J. W. Brown, Private G. M. Shiflett. Co. E. Private Wm. Brady, R. Compton, Private A. Carus, Wm. Ford. Co. G. 2d Sergeant J. Corder, Private E. F. Cary, R. F. Bywaters, S. F. Baker, J. E. Deavers, Private J. Settle, R. Settle, H. Strenstreet, R. F. Wharton, J. T. Willett. Co. H. Private P. H. Bryant, Private D. H. Proffitt, L. H. Escue, Floyd Spencer, Geo. F. Bolton, E. E. Wills. Phillip Nelson, Co. I. 1st Sergeant S. H. Christian, Private J. F. Page, 5th Sergeant G. P. Rowsey, James Spencer. [1 officer, 45 men.] W. D. Moffett, Capt. Commandin
in their ancient reputation by their conduct on the bloody field, and well have they remembered the injunction. The organization of the company dates back as far as 1794, and many of our best and most prominent citizens have marched under its flag. Richmond Grays. The following are the casualties in company G, 12th Virginia regiment, in the fight on Saturday: Killed — Joseph B. Sacrey, (printer, of Richmond, a native of Fredericksburg,) Jed. Gibson. Wounded--Privates Burkes and William Ford, severely. The Grays were the first company which left Richmond at the commencement of the war. They went to Portsmouth at the time of the burning of Gosport navy-yard. Sixth Virginia regiment. Killed--Captain David Wright, of company H, formerly a citizen of Richmond; Lieutenant Steward M. Spratt, of company C. These are all the casualties we have been able to obtain. Washington Artillery. In the battalion of Washington Artillery, of New Orleans, on Saturday, the casu