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John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life. You can also browse the collection for M. F. Ford or search for M. F. Ford in all documents.

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the centre, cut out of it. It was designed by Brevet Brigadier-General John Hough, the assistant adjutant-general of the corps, being selected out of many designs, submitted by Major-General A. J. Smith, the corps commander, and, in his honor, named the A. J. Smith cross. It is easily distinguished from the Maltese cross, in being bounded by curved instead of straight lines. No order for its adoption was issued. The badge of the Seventeenth Corps, said to have been suggested by General M. F. Ford, and adopted in accordance with General Orders issued by his commander, Major-General Francis P. Blair, was an arrow. He says, In its swiftness, in its surety of striking where wanted, and its destructive powers, when so intended, it is probably as emblematical of this corps as any design that could be adopted. The order was issued at Goldsboro, N. C., March 25, 1865. The order further provides that the arrow for divisions shall be two inches long, and for corps headquarters one and
, issue the rations, slaughter the oxen for fresh beef, and use the wagons for fuel to cook it. A very practical scheme, at first view, surely. A detail of mechanics was made to put the wagons in order, a requisition was drawn for yokes, and Captain Ford of a Wisconsin regiment, who had had experience in such work, was detailed to break in the steers to yoke and draft. The captain spent all winter and the following spring in perfecting the Bull train, as it was called. The first serious se; but the general was not yet ready to give up the idea, and so continued the organization. Chancellorsville battle came when all the trains remained in camp. But the day of trial was near. When the army started on the Gettysburg campaign, Captain Ford put his train in rear of the corps wagon-train, and started, with the inevitable result. The mules and horses walked right away from the oxen, in spite of the goading and lashing and yelling of their drivers. By nightfall they were doomed
317,353 Davis, Jefferson, 64 Davis, W. S., 329 Dayton, L. M., 401 Desertion, 157-63 Douglas, Stephen A., 15 Draft,68-69,215-16 Dry Tortugas, 156 Eaton, Joseph H., 130 Ellis, George, 51 Ely's Ford, Va., 384 Embler, A. Henry, 266 Emory, William H., 265 Enlisting, 34-42, 198-202 Envelopes (patriotic), 64-65 Everett, Edward, 16 Executions, 157-63 Faneuil Hall, 31,45 First Bull Run, 27, 251-53,298, 340,356 Flags, 338-40 Foraging, 231-49 Ford, M. F., 264 Fort Hell, 59,385 Fort Independence, 44 Fort Lyon, 255 Fort McAllister, 406 Fort Monroe, 120, 162 Fort Moultrie, 22 Fort Sedgewick, 385 Fort Sumter, 22 Fort Warren, 44-45 Fort Welch, Va., 162 Fredericksburg, 100,237,308, 391 Fremont, John C., 46 French, William H., 307,353 Fresh Pond, Mass., 45 Games, 65-66 Garrison, William L., 20 Geary, John W., 295 Georgetown, 298 Germanna Ford, Va., 317 Gettysburg, 54, 72,239, 259,273, 378,406 G