Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Foreman or search for Foreman in all documents.

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inth Pennsylvania cavalry, Colonel Jordon; Eighth Kentucky cavalry, Colonel Baldwin; Third Kentucky cavalry, Lieutenant-Colonel King; Second Kentucky cavalry, Captain Foreman; and Tenth Wisconsin light artillery, Captain Beebe commanding, amounting to two thousand eight hundred (2800) men. The Second brigade, Colonel Smith D. Ats of fours, by battalions, had the left; the Third Kentucky, (Lieutenant-Colonel King,) the centre; the Fifth Kentucky (Colonel Baldwin) and Second Kentucky, (Captain Foreman,) the right. The advance was sounded, and in less than twenty minutes the enemy was driven from his position, the town gained, and Wheeler's entire force comnesboro, December fourth, have all, at the various places mentioned, behaved most handsomely and attracted my special attention. The Second Kentucky cavalry, Captain Foreman, although but a detachment, at Buckhead Creek and at Waynesboro did the duty of a regiment, and deserves great praise. Captain Beebe, commanding the artill
nks so far extended, that it was useless to attempt to turn them. I therefore determined to break his centre. Colonel Murray, having the advance, was directed to make a disposition accordingly. The Eighth Indiana (Colonel Jones) was dismounted and pushed forward as skirmishers; the Ninth Pennsylvania, (Colonel Jordon,) in columns of fours, by battalions, had the left; the Third Kentucky, (Lieutenant-Colonel King,) the centre; the Fifth Kentucky (Colonel Baldwin) and Second Kentucky, (Captain Foreman,) the right. The advance was sounded, and in less than twenty minutes the enemy was driven from his position, the town gained, and Wheeler's entire force completely routed. The Fifth Ohio, Fifth Kentucky, and a portion of the Ninth Pennsylvania cavalry, followed in close pursuit to Briar Creek, a distance of eight miles from the point from where the first attack was made. After burning the bridges above and below, the railroad bridges as well as the latter, the command marched to A
Indiana, when cut off and surrounded near Waynesboro; Colonel Heath and his regiment, at Buckhead Creek. The Ninety-second Illinois mounted infantry, Lieutenant-Colonel Van Buskirk; the Ninth Pennsylvania, Colonel Jordon ; the Third Kentucky, Lieutenant-Colonel King; the Tenth Ohio, Fifth Ohio, and Ninth Michigan cavalry, at Waynesboro, December fourth, have all, at the various places mentioned, behaved most handsomely and attracted my special attention. The Second Kentucky cavalry, Captain Foreman, although but a detachment, at Buckhead Creek and at Waynesboro did the duty of a regiment, and deserves great praise. Captain Beebe, commanding the artillery, and his lieutenants, Stetson, Fowler, and Clark, have performed their duty well, and to the satisfaction of their immediate commanders. I cannot speak too highly of my staff. Through the exertions of Captain Dunbar, Assistant Quartermaster, and Brookfield, Commissary of Subsistence, my command has always been well supplied.
ck A. M. Struck the enemy two miles from Lovejoy's Station, in force, behind intrenchments, with artillery. The Eighth Indiana and Third Kentucky, dismounted, moved upon the works, which were taken possession of by the Eighth Indiana. The Third Kentucky, mounting, made a most brilliant and successful sabre-charge, resulting in a total demoralization of the enemy and the capture of two pieces of artillery. The engagement also furnished us with forty-two prisoners. The Second Kentucky, Captain Foreman, coming up after the charge, pushed on, but only to find the enemy straggling. 17th. Marched at eight o'clock, encamped four miles south-west of Jackson. 18th. Marched at eight A. M.; camped near Cork. The Fifth Kentucky, crossing the Ocmulgee River, succeeded in capturing one hundred and twenty-five horses and mules. 19th. Marched at midnight; crossed the Ocmulgee on pontoons at Planter's Factory. The Second Kentucky was left to protect the division supply-train. Camped
could, Lieutenant Commanding Alexander resumed his position in the line. He sustained himself gallantly during the remainder of the day, and speaks highly of all under his command. That evening he was ordered to Norfolk for repairs. The Beaufort, Lieutenant Commanding Parker, was in close contact with the enemy frequently during the day, and all on board behaved gallantly. Lieutenant Commanding Parker expresses his warmest thanks to his officers and men for their coolness. Acting Midshipman Foreman, who accompanied him as volunteer aid, Midshipman Mallory and Newton, captain's clerk, Bain, and Mr. Gray, pilot, are all specially mentioned by him. On the twenty-first instant, I forwarded to the department correct lists of the casualties on board all the vessels of the squadron, on the eighth; none, it appears, occurred on the ninth. While in the act of closing this report, I received the communication of the department, dated twenty-second instant, relieving me temporaril