Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Foreman or search for Foreman in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
Major Goldsborough was with the Philadelphia Record from 1870 to 1890. In 1890 he migrated to the far Northwest, settling at Tacoma in Washington State. Here he came in contact with what was regarded as the roughest gang of printers on the Pacific Coast. Prior to his arrival no one had dared to run counter to them; but as foreman of the Tacoma Daily Globe he cleared out the gang, unionized the office and made it one of the best on the slope. This feat gained for him the title Fighting Foreman. Upon the sale of the Globe, Major Goldsborough removed to Everett, Washington, where he had invested in real estate. He worked for a time on the Everett Herald, and later started the Everett Sun. About 1894 he returned to Philadelphia, contributing war articles to the Record and annotating for the war collection of D. Parish, Esq., in the New York Historical Society. About two years ago Major Goldsborough was engaged by Mr. Parish to write a history of the famous Maryland Line in the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Maryland Warrior and hero. (search)
Major Goldsborough was with the Philadelphia Record from 1870 to 1890. In 1890 he migrated to the far Northwest, settling at Tacoma in Washington State. Here he came in contact with what was regarded as the roughest gang of printers on the Pacific Coast. Prior to his arrival no one had dared to run counter to them; but as foreman of the Tacoma Daily Globe he cleared out the gang, unionized the office and made it one of the best on the slope. This feat gained for him the title Fighting Foreman. Upon the sale of the Globe, Major Goldsborough removed to Everett, Washington, where he had invested in real estate. He worked for a time on the Everett Herald, and later started the Everett Sun. About 1894 he returned to Philadelphia, contributing war articles to the Record and annotating for the war collection of D. Parish, Esq., in the New York Historical Society. About two years ago Major Goldsborough was engaged by Mr. Parish to write a history of the famous Maryland Line in the