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L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion, Part 2: daring enterprises of officers and men. (search)
n toward Winchester. The first stragglers had by this time, about ten A. M., reached Winchester. The camps, commissary supplies, and lines of earth works of the Union army, had fallen into the hands of the rebels, and they had captured twenty-four cannon and twelve hundred prisoners. The Union army was beaten, badly beaten, though not routed; they were retreating slowly and in good order, but still retreating toward Winchester. How all this was changed by Sheridan's arrival, let Captain de Forest, himself a staff-officer and actor in the battle, tell: At this time, at the close of this unfortunate struggle of five hours, we were joined by Sheridan, who had passed the night in Winchester, on his way back from Washington, and who must have heard of Early's attack about the time that its success became decisive. It was near ten o'clock when he came up the pike at a three-minute trot, swinging his cap and shouting to the stragglers: Face the other way, boys. We are going back
n toward Winchester. The first stragglers had by this time, about ten A. M., reached Winchester. The camps, commissary supplies, and lines of earth works of the Union army, had fallen into the hands of the rebels, and they had captured twenty-four cannon and twelve hundred prisoners. The Union army was beaten, badly beaten, though not routed; they were retreating slowly and in good order, but still retreating toward Winchester. How all this was changed by Sheridan's arrival, let Captain de Forest, himself a staff-officer and actor in the battle, tell: At this time, at the close of this unfortunate struggle of five hours, we were joined by Sheridan, who had passed the night in Winchester, on his way back from Washington, and who must have heard of Early's attack about the time that its success became decisive. It was near ten o'clock when he came up the pike at a three-minute trot, swinging his cap and shouting to the stragglers: Face the other way, boys. We are going back