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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 32 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 10 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 6 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 19, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Index, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for John W. Forney or search for John W. Forney in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

-Lecompton Dem., of Ind., 2; and there were 4 scattering: necessary to a choice 118. Finally, on the forty-fourth ballot, February 1, 1860. Mr. Smith's name having been withdrawn, the vote was declared: for Pennington 117; John A. McClernand, Dem., 85; John A. Gilmer, Amer., 16; and there were 15 scattering. Mr. Henry Winter Davis, of Md., who had hitherto voted with the Americans, now cast his vote for Pennington, and elected him — he having the exact number necessary to a choice. John W. Forney, anti-Lecompton Dem., was soon after elected Clerk by a close vote. The majority in the Senate was not merely Democratic of tile Lecompton or extreme pro-Slavery caste; it was especially hostile to Senator Douglas, and determined to punish him for his powerful opposition to the Lecompton bill, by reading him out of the party. To this end, Mr. Jefferson Davis submitted Feb. 2, 1860. an elaborate series of resolves, whereof the following is the most material: 4. Resolved, That n
s present from Tennessee, making 44 in all. Western Virginia had chosen three members at the regular State election in April, while another had been elected by a light vote, either then or subsequently, from the district lying along the Potomac, above and below Harper's Ferry. Of Representatives, 157 in all answered to their names at the first call. Galusha A. Grow [Republican], of Pennsylvania, was chosen Speaker, and Emerson Etheridge [Bell-Everett], of Tennessee, Clerk of the House. John W. Forney [Douglas], of Pennsylvania, was soon afterward elected Clerk of the Senate. President Lincoln's Message was transmitted to both Houses on the following day. It was largely devoted to a recital of occurrences already narrated. It did not distinctly avow that the Government had ever purposed the evacuation of Fort Sumter, but set forth the material facts as follows: On the 5th of March (the present incumbent's first full day in office), a letter of Major Anderson, commanding at For
fifteen miles distant, and were foolishly pushed on to attack, though the advantage in numbers, in position, and even in artillery, appears to have been decidedly on our side. They were, of course, easily and badly beaten; the Pennsylvanians fighting with cool intrepidity and entire confidence of success. Our aggregate loss was but 9 killed and 60 wounded--among the latter, Lieut.-Col. Kane, who led his men with signal gallantry. The Rebels lost, by their own account, 230; among them, Col. Forney, of the 10th Alabama, wounded, and Lieut. Col. Martin, killed. They left 25 horses dead on the field, with two caissons--one of them exploded,--running off their guns by hand; the 6th South Carolina, out of 315 present, losing 65--in part, by the fire of the 1st Kentucky (Rebel), which, mistaking them for Unionists, poured a murderous volley into them at forty yards' distance. It was a foolish affair on the part of Stuart, who was palpably misled by the gas-conade of Evans, with regard
315. Foote, H. S., of Miss., 197; opposes Clay's Compromise measures, 203; does not object to abolishing the Slave-Trade in the District, 204; 207; chosen Union Governor of Mississippi, 211. Foote, Capt., at the battle of Belmont, 597. Forney, Col. John H., (Rebel,) allusion to in Bragg's order, 436; wounded at Dranesville, 626. Forney, John W., chosen Clerk of the House, 806; chosen Clerk of the Senate, 555. Forsyth, John C., to envoy from Texas, 151, Fort Beauregard, besiegForney, John W., chosen Clerk of the House, 806; chosen Clerk of the Senate, 555. Forsyth, John C., to envoy from Texas, 151, Fort Beauregard, besieged and taken, 604-5. Fort Clark, bombarded, 599; captured, 600. Ft. Hatteras, bombarded, 599; captured, 600. Fort Jackson, Ga., seized by Georgia, 411. Fort Jackson, La., seized by the State, 412. Fort Macon, seized by North Carolina, 411. Fort McRae, seized by the Florida troops, 412. Fort Morgan, seized by Alabama, 412. Fort Moultrie, evacuated by Major Anderson, 407; what the Charleston papers said, 407-8; occupied by S. C., 409; fires on Star of the West, 412. Fort