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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 2, 1862., [Electronic resource] 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 6 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Meeting at the White Sulphur Springs. (search)
nteers who marched out of the town of Holly Springs, Mississippi, for the relief of Texas, then threatened by invasion from Mexico. In that little band stood Bedford Forrest, a tall, black haired, gray eyed, athletic youth, scarce twenty years of age, who then gave the first evidence of the military ardor he possessed. The company saw no fighting, for the danger was over before it arrived, and the men received no pay. Finding himself in a strange country without friends or money, Forrest, with the characteristic energy which distinguished him in after life, split rails at fifty cents per hundred and made the money necessary to bring him back to his familyrothers and their overseer Bean. Pistols and bowieknives were freely used, and after a terrible fight, in which thirteen shots were fired, the three Matlocks and Forrest all wounded, his assailants fled and left him master of the field. Lieutenant-Colonel of a cavalry battalion. On the 14th of June, 1861, Nathan Bedford Forr
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 13: results of the work and proofs of its genuineness (search)
never wavered—he said he was going to the land of light and peace, where he should meet his many loved ones who had gone before; and again: Tell my dear wife I go to meet our angel child, and to come to us. At one time he said: The Providence of God is inscrutable, but I submit in hope. He died without a struggle. It is comfortable to know that all his wants were supplied during his sufferings. He experienced no pain, and was conscious to the last moment. As soon as he was wounded General Forrest sent his surgeon to him; the poor people, who had been bereft of all their worldly substance, went to see him from miles around. The following touching scene is described by Rev. J. A. Parker, who labored as an army chaplain. He was conveying a number of wounded soldiers by water to the hospitals at Mobile: At two o'clock in the morning we started in a skiff for the city. The wind was high and the water rough. Poor wounded men, how they suffered the pangs of thirst, with no
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix no. 2: the work of grace in other armies of the Confederacy. (search)
nnessee, and served the Church for a longer period there than any member of our Conference. Lieutenant Charles Dunham, a most worthy young minister, fell in battle during the war. I also visited Rev. Dr. D. C. Kelley, lieutenant-colonel of Forrest's renowned regiment of cavalry. The doctor was quite sick at Aberdeen. His record for gallantry is known and read of many, and needs no mention. These brethren, and others whose names are not noted here, were all active and abundant in labors Mississippi. I visited and preached twice for Patterson's Brigade of Roddy's Division of Cavalry. The officers and soldiers took much interest in preaching and were glad to be furnished with 500 copies of the Herald. I supplied a portion of Forrest's corps of cavalry also with Heralds and hymn-books on their return from Middle Tennessee. I visited the Wayside Home at Okalona, Mississippi, preaching twice to the soldiers who stop over at night either in going to or from the front, severa
rom Washington. His brigade of about 3,000 men made the best of the situation. The officers and men got up horse-races. The young officers were entertained by the pretty girls—daughters of Colonel Cannon, Dr. Brown, Dr. Walker, and Mrs. Stuart, at Columbus, and of Dr. Jett, Major Witter, and Mr. Britton, at Washington. Many notables and notables-to-be resided there—Senator Charles B. Mitchell, John R. Eaken, chancellor and supreme judge, Senator James K. Jones, then a private under General Forrest, Col. Daniel Jones, afterward governor; and sojourning there were Judges David Walker, Geo. C. Watkins and Albert Pike, for it was the temporary capital of Arkansas. Governor Flanagan, who resided at Arkadelphia, was near there at the head of State troops; but ex-Governor Rector was at Columbus, a member of the Home Guard. Thus passed six or eight weeks, while the men and horses were recuperating for the season when the Federals should advance in force. Meanwhile the usual scouts an
valry command might be substituted for Walker's infantry division. General Beauregard wrote to him on December 2d, to reinforce Hood in Tennessee or make a diversion in Missouri. The diversion had been made, as General Smith had already written to the President, by General Price, who took with him to Missouri a force most of which was then available for no other purpose. He had thus drawn the Sixteenth army corps (A. J. Smith) from Memphis, and Grierson's cavalry from Mississippi, leaving Forrest free to operate in northern Georgia, compelling the Federals to concentrate 50,000 men in Missouri and diverting reinforcements which would have been sent to Sherman. Gen. John B. Magruder, now in command of the district of Arkansas, kept Steele at Little Rock, in constant apprehension of a movement against that city. General Smith at one time in November seriously contemplated such a movement, and Churchill's, Polignac's, Forney's and M. M. Parsons' divisions were assembled in the vic
e was transferred, was then ordered to Des Arc and thence to Memphis, dismounted, and sent to Corinth. After the battle of Corinth, October 4, 1862, it was remounted, and served to the end of the war under the greatest of cavalry leaders, Gen. Bedford Forrest. At the battle of Thompson Station, in which Forrest commanded, Colonel Earle, of the regiment, and Capt. Joe Jester, of Hot Springs, were killed. John J. Sumpter, of Hot Springs, who had enlisted as a private in Jester's company, was maForrest commanded, Colonel Earle, of the regiment, and Capt. Joe Jester, of Hot Springs, were killed. John J. Sumpter, of Hot Springs, who had enlisted as a private in Jester's company, was made captain. Thomas C. Scott, of Little Rock, was color sergeant, and lost an arm. Colonel Danley was captain of one of the original companies, of which John C. Henderson, of Saline, was made captain. Frank M. Conway was lieutenant, also S. C. W. Lewis. Senator James K. Jones was a private in Captain Holmes' company, of Dallas county, in this command, after rejection from the First Arkansas and a Clark county battery which he offered to join. His rejection was based on his physical inability
ggold to a position on the extreme right of Bragg's line, near Reed's bridge, and Walker was next south, near Alexander's bridge, while Cleburne was in line of battle still further south, on the extreme left of the army. The Arkansans of Govan's brigade were among the first west of the creek, crossing on the night of the 18th, after skirmishing at Byram's ford; and next morning the brigade participated in the initial action of the battle, brought on by Thomas' northerly advance attacking Forrest near Reed's bridge. About noon, Govan attacked, in line of battle facing north, and drove the Federals from his front, capturing three guns of Loomis' battery and other pieces, and 300 or 400 prisoners. He pushed on with success against a second line, until overwhelmed by others of Thomas' forces sent against his westward flank, and compelled to retire. In this two hours fight there was heavy loss, among the killed Col. L. Featherston, commanding the Fifth and Thirteenth regiments, and am
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
in McLemore's cove, to divert his attention from our real movement. Brigadier-General Forrest, with his own and Pegram's division of cavalry, covered the movement crossed and formed, when a brisk engagement commenced with our cavalry, under Forrest on the extreme right. About nine o'clock a brigade from Walker was ordered to G. W. Gordon, W. B. Bate, and E. Capers. 2. Biographical sketch of General Bedford Forrest—By Rev. Dr. Kelly. 3. Sketch of Major Strange, of Forrest's Staff—BForrest's Staff—By Colonel M. C. Galloway, of Memphis. 4. Tishomingo Creek (Sturgis's Raid)—By Captain John W. Morton, of Nashville, late Chief of Artillery of Forrest's cavalry. Forrest's cavalry. 5. Forrest's Raid into West Tennessee—By Colonel Cox, of Franklin, and Major G. V. Rambaut, of Memphis. 6. Recollections of the Battle of Shiloh—By Captain S. Forrest's Raid into West Tennessee—By Colonel Cox, of Franklin, and Major G. V. Rambaut, of Memphis. 6. Recollections of the Battle of Shiloh—By Captain S. W. Steele. 7. A paper by General J. B. Palmer, of Murfreesboro. 8. Prison Experience at Johnson's Island—By Captain Beard. 9. Memoir of General P
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga. (search)
front. Major-General Wheeler, with two divisions of cavalry, occupied the positions on the extreme left, vacated by Hill's corps, and was directed to press the enemy in McLemore's cove, to divert his attention from our real movement. Brigadier-General Forrest, with his own and Pegram's division of cavalry, covered the movement on our front and right. Brigadier-General B. R. Johnston, whose brigade had been at Ringgold holding the railroad, was moved towards Reed's bridge, which brought him , and thus secured a junction with Hood after night. The movement was resumed at daylight on the 19th, and Buckner's corps, with Cheatham's division, of Polk's, had crossed and formed, when a brisk engagement commenced with our cavalry, under Forrest on the extreme right. About nine o'clock a brigade from Walker was ordered to Forrest's support, and soon after Walker was ordered to attack with his whole force. Our line was now formed with Buckner's left resting on the Chickamauga, about on
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
ssed in papers by Generals B. F. Cheatham, G. W. Gordon, W. B. Bate, and E. Capers. 2. Biographical sketch of General Bedford Forrest—By Rev. Dr. Kelly. 3. Sketch of Major Strange, of Forrest's Staff—By Colonel M. C. Galloway, of Memphis. 4Forrest's Staff—By Colonel M. C. Galloway, of Memphis. 4. Tishomingo Creek (Sturgis's Raid)—By Captain John W. Morton, of Nashville, late Chief of Artillery of Forrest's cavalry. 5. Forrest's Raid into West Tennessee—By Colonel Cox, of Franklin, and Major G. V. Rambaut, of Memphis. 6. RecollectionsForrest's cavalry. 5. Forrest's Raid into West Tennessee—By Colonel Cox, of Franklin, and Major G. V. Rambaut, of Memphis. 6. Recollections of the Battle of Shiloh—By Captain S. W. Steele. 7. A paper by General J. B. Palmer, of Murfreesboro. 8. Prison Experience at Johnson's Island—By Captain Beard. 9. Memoir of General Pat Cleburne—By General John C. Brown. Other papers anForrest's Raid into West Tennessee—By Colonel Cox, of Franklin, and Major G. V. Rambaut, of Memphis. 6. Recollections of the Battle of Shiloh—By Captain S. W. Steele. 7. A paper by General J. B. Palmer, of Murfreesboro. 8. Prison Experience at Johnson's Island—By Captain Beard. 9. Memoir of General Pat Cleburne—By General John C. Brown. Other papers and addresses will be announced. The meeting will be held during the week of the great competitive drill, and at such hours as not to conflict with that; the railroads will all give reduced rates of fare, and we urge our friends fr
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