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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 30, 1865., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 21, 1860., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House 6 0 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 4 0 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 18, 1860., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 30, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Xxxviii. (search)
Xxxviii. In March, 1864, Edwin Forrest came to Washington to fulfil an engagement at Ford's Theatre. It was announced one day that he was to appear that evening in Richelieu. I was with the President, when Senator Harris of New York came in. After he had finished his business, which was to secure the remittance of the sentence of one of his constituents, who had been imprisoned on what seemed insufficient grounds, I told the President that Forrest was to play Richelieu that evening, and, knowing his tastes, I said it was a play which I thought he would enjoy, for Forrest's representation of it was the most life-like of anything I had ever seen upon thForrest's representation of it was the most life-like of anything I had ever seen upon the stage. Who wrote the play? said he. Bulwer, I replied. Ah! he rejoined; well, I knew Bulwer wrote novels, but I did not know he was a play-writer also. It may seem somewhat strange to say, he continued, but I never read an entire novel in my life! Said Judge Harris, Is it possible? Yes, returned the President, it is a fac
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alger, William Rounseville, 1822- (search)
Alger, William Rounseville, 1822- Clergyman and author; born in Freetown, Mass., Dec. 30, 1822; graduated at Harvard Theological School in 1847; held charges in Boston, New York, Denver, Chicago, and Portland, Me., subsequently making his home in Boston. His publications include: Symbolic history of the cross; History of the doctrine of a future life; The genius of solitude; The friendships of women; Poetry of the Orient; Life of Edwin Forrest; Sounds of consolation in human life, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Forrest, Edwin 1806-1872 (search)
Forrest, Edwin 1806-1872 Actor; born in Philadelphia, Pa., March 9, 1806. While still a boy he began performing female and juvenile parts, being especially remembered as Young Norval in Home's pe married Catharine, a daughter of John Sinclair, the widely known ballad-singer. After 1845 Mr. Forrest spent two more years in England, during which his friendship with Mr. Macready was broken. Husy on the part of Macready. A few weeks after, when Macready appeared as Hamlet in Edinburgh, Forrest hissed him from a box in which he stood. On May 10, 1849, when Macready appeared as Macbeth in the Astor Place Theatre, in New York, the friends of Forrest interrupted the performance. The result was the Astor Place riot, in which twenty-two men were killed and thirty-six wounded. In 1858 MrMr. Forrest announced his retirement from the stage, but appeared at intervals till 1871, when ill-health compelled him to retire permanently. He was a man of literary culture and accumulated a large
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Trials. (search)
of Dr. George W. Parkman in the Medical College, Boston, Nov. 23, 1849. Webster partly burns his victim. The remains identified by a set of false teeth. Webster convicted and hanged; trial......March 19-30, 1850 Catherine N. Forrest v. Edwin Forrest; divorce and alimony granted to Mrs. Forrest......Dec. 16, 1851–Jan. 26, 1852 Anthony Burns, fugitive-slave case, Boston......May 27-31, 1854 Dr. Stephen T. Beale, ether case......1855 United States v. Henry Hertz et al., for hirinMrs. Forrest......Dec. 16, 1851–Jan. 26, 1852 Anthony Burns, fugitive-slave case, Boston......May 27-31, 1854 Dr. Stephen T. Beale, ether case......1855 United States v. Henry Hertz et al., for hiring and retaining persons to go out of the United States to enlist in the British foreign legion for the Crimea: tried in the district court of the United States for eastern district of Pennsylvania......1855 Slave case in Cincinnati, O. (see Harper's magazine, vol. XII., p. 691)......April, 1856 James P. Casey, for shooting James King, of William, editor of the San Francisco Bulletin, and Charles Cora, murderer of United States Marshal Richardson; tried and hanged by the vigilance committe
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
t for 200,000 men for the navy and the reserve ordered for April 15 by the President......March 14, 1864 Governor Michael Hahn appointed military governor of Louisiana......March 15, 1864 Enabling act for admission of Nevada and Colorado......March 21, 1864 New York Sanitary Commission fair (receipts $1,200,000) opened. April 4, 1864 Battles of Sabine Cross-roads, Pleasant Grove, and Pleasant Hill, La.......April 8-9, 1864 Fort Pillow, Tenn., captured by Confederates under Forrest, and colored garrison slaughtered......April 12, 1864 Enabling act to admit Nebraska approved......April 19, 1864 Motto In God we trust first stamped upon the bronze 2-cent coins authorized by act......April 22, 1864 Hon. Daniel Clark, of New Hampshire, elected president of the Senate pro tem........April 26, 1864 Army of the Potomac, 130,000 strong, crosses the Rapidan......May 4, 1864 Sherman advances southward from Chattanooga......May 4, 1864 Sassacus defeats the Confe
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mississippi, (search)
ed by Federals under General McPherson, May 12; McPherson occupies Jackson, May 14; Grant defeats Pemberton at Champion Hills, May 16, and at Big Black River, May 17; Vicksburg invested by forces under General Grant, May 18; Vicksburg surrendered, July 4; Jackson evacuated by General Johnston, who had occupied it after the advance of the Federals on Vicksburg, and the city is occupied by General Sherman......July 16, 1863 Sherman's Meridan expedition leaves Vicksburg......Feb. 3, 1864 Forrest, Confederate, defeats Sturgis at Guntown......June 10, 1864 Upon the surrender of General Taylor to General Canby, Governor Clarke by proclamation recalls the State officers, with the archives, to Jackson, and convenes the legislature. He recommends a convention to repeal the ordinance of secession and remodel constitution......May 6, 1865 Judge William L. Sharkey appointed provisional governor by President Johnson, the federal government not recognizing Governor Clarke and the leg
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 6: return to New York journalism (search)
tred of absolutism than upon any exaggerated love of free government. It was in May of this year that the Macready riots took place in New York. In consequence of a misunderstanding, and of possible rivalry existing for some years between Edwin Forrest, the American tragedian, and William Charles Macready, an English actor of distinction then on a tour of the United States, the friends of Forrest took violent measures to prevent Macready from acting in New York, and brought about a bloody dForrest took violent measures to prevent Macready from acting in New York, and brought about a bloody disturbance for the suppression of which both the police and the military forces were called out. Some twenty-three persons were killed and thirty-six wounded. Great excitement prevailed for a week. The best citizens took part in behalf of Macready's protection and his right to act. The newspapers led in the discussion, and in the end the cause of free speech and free acting prevailed. The country papers took sides, and one published at Wilkesbarre strenuously denied Macready's right to act if
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: the early drama, 1756-1860 (search)
mportant, this year marked the real beginning of Edwin Forrest's career, both in Philadelphia and in New York. hile in Philadelphia, under the encouragement of Edwin Forrest and others, a group of dramatists arose whose wohn Kerr's first draft of Rip Van Winkle. In 1829 Forrest produced the Indian play of Metamora by John Augustplay became bywords in the mouths of the people. Forrest also inspired Robert Montgomery Bird of Philadelphia to write The Gladiator in 1831. It was played by Forrest in all parts of the Union and at Drury Lane in 1836ts in a vigorous personality, especially suited for Forrest, and clothed the sentiments expressed in a dignifieially his Broker of Bogota (1834), both produced by Forrest, are among the most significant of American dramas. manuscript. Of his tragedy Caius Marius, in which Forrest starred, we have only tradition and one scene. Hishiladelphia in 1835, was not written originally for Forrest, it was through his acting that it received its bes
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
yant), 271 Firkins, O. W., 361 n. First play in America, the, 216 n. Fletcher, Giles, 155 Flint, Timothy, 211, 318 Flood of years, the, 265, 271 Flynn, Thomas, 231 Folger, Peter, 109, 151, 152 Follen, Charles T., 332, 333 Fontainville Abbey, 231 Forayers, the, 315 Ford, P. L., 148 n., 215 n., 216 n. Foreign Quarterly, the, 207 Forest Hymn, a, 265, 267 n. Forest life, 318 Forest Princess, the, 225 Forest Rose, the, 227, 227 n. Foresters, the, 163 Forrest, Edwin, 220, 221, 222 Forrest, Colonel, Thomas, 217 Foster, Mrs., Hannah Webster, 285 Fothergill, Dr., John, 195 Four elements, constitutions, ages of man, and seasons of the year, 154 Fourier, 339, 340 Fox, George, 8 Foxe, North-West, 2 Francesca da Rimini, 223, 224, 225, 232 Francis, Convers, 333 Franklin, Abiah Folger, 92 Franklin, Benjamin, 57, 81, 85, 90-110, 112, I13,114, 115, I16, 17, 21, 122, 134, 139, 140, 140 n., 141, 142, 144, 146, 151, 161, 177, 195, 198,
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 10: the Rynders Mob.—1850. (search)
.55. patronage of the successful candidate for Vice-President, Geo. M. Dallas. and he took office as Weigher in the Custom-house of the metropolis. He found time, while thus employed, to engineer the Astor Place riot on behalf of the actor Edwin Forrest; Lib. 19.79. Forrest against his English rival Macready, on May 10, 1849, and the year 1850 opened with his trial for this Lib. 20.24. atrocity and his successful defence by John Van Buren. On February 16 he and his Club broke up an anti-WiForrest against his English rival Macready, on May 10, 1849, and the year 1850 opened with his trial for this Lib. 20.24. atrocity and his successful defence by John Van Buren. On February 16 he and his Club broke up an anti-Wilmot Nat. A. S. Standard, 10.20. Proviso meeting in New York—a seeming inconsistency, but it was charged against Rynders that he had offered Lib. 20.86. to give the State of New York to Clay in the election of 1844 for $30,000, and met with a reluctant refusal. In March he was arrested for a brutal assault on a gentleman Lib. 20.43. in a hotel, but the victim and the witnesses found it prudent not to appear against a ruffian who did not hesitate to threaten the district-attorney in open cou
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