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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 243 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 240 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 229 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 188 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 179 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 130 2 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 110 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 102 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 94 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 76 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for N. B. Forrest or search for N. B. Forrest in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. (search)
rtment. Map of North Mississippi and West Tennessee. Map of the Corinth and Iuka region. General Bragg recognized the inadequacy of General Smith's force, and on June 27th he transferred the division commanded by Major-General John P. McCown from. Tupelo to Chattanooga. General Kirby Smith, in a letter dated July 14th, 1862, estimated Stevenson's division at 10,000, Heth's and McCown's at 10,000, Morgan's cavalry 1300. Official Records, Vol. XVI., Pt. II., p. 727.--editors. Forrest and John H. Morgan had already been sent into middle Tennessee and Kentucky, and the operations of these enterprising officers materially lessened the pressure upon General Smith. Correspondence between Generals Bragg and Smith resulted in an order, dated July 21st, transferring the entire Army of Mississippi to Chattanooga. To mislead the enemy and to prevent an advance upon Tupelo, Bragg had, on the 19th, sent Colonel Joseph Wheeler with a brigade of cavalry into west Tennessee, and Bri
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Morgan's cavalry during the Bragg invasion. (search)
ers from General John C. Breekinridge, who was stationed with a small infantry force at Murfreesboro‘, to cooperate with Forrest in a movement intended to effect the destruction of the rolling-stock of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad Company collected at Edgefield, on the bank of the Cumberland River, opposite Nashville. It was planned that Forrest should make such a demonstration south of Nashville that the attention of the garrison would be attracted, while Morgan should dash into Edg a sharp fight he drove this force back and obtained possession of the cars it was intended he should destroy. We heard Forrest's artillery at the same moment on the other side of the river. But Nashville was so strongly fortified on that side, and perhaps, also, the inadequacy of the small force under Forrest to make any serious attempt upon the place was so apparent, that although he advanced resolutely upon the works, the movement failed: a large portion of the garrison was dispatched to
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., East Tennessee and the campaign of Perryville. (search)
anooga Railroad. I had just organized a new brigade at Murfreesboro' to occupy McMinnville. On the morning of the 13th Forrest, with a large body of cavalry, surprised the brigade, killed and wounded some and captured the rest, damaged the railroaivision, himself and one brigade going by railroad. He had just reached Murfreesboro' with a portion of his troops when Forrest, on the 18th, appeared again on the railroad between him and Nashville, captured guards, and destroyed two more bridges. authorities took prompt measures to counteract them. The sudden appearance of large bodies of cavalry under Morgan and Forrest on my communications in Tennessee and Kentucky early in July, and the increased activity of small parties, were a part oy corps which were comparatively efficient even without instruction; and accordingly we see Stuart, and John Morgan, and Forrest riding with impunity around the Union armies, and destroying or harassing their communications. Late in the war that ag
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.63 (search)
Dorn.--editors. on the 20th of December, and Forrest, by a brilliant raid into east Tennessee, so . movement; On the 11th of December General N. B. Forrest moved with his brigade from Columbia, ommunications in west Tennessee. On the 16th Forrest captured Lexington, securing a number of priss north and south of Jackson, and on the 19th Forrest, with the remainder of his men, about four hu of the 43d Illinois, disputed the advance of Forrest, and kept up a running fight until within rea the Memphis and Ohio Railroads. On the 28th Forrest started from McKenzie southward toward Lexington. Meanwhile the Union troops along Forrest's line of march that had escaped capture, strengthenn and Humboldt, and were preparing to cut off Forrest's retreat. On the 31st the main body of the r's brigade, and after a desperate engagement Forrest retired toward the Tennessee. Forrest's estiForrest's estimate of his force in this battle is 1800 men. On January 2d, the whole command recrossed the Tennes[2 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The defense of Vicksburg. (search)
wed a succession of movements against Vicksburg, having for their object the turning of that point. They were all uniformly unsuccessful, and were so remote from the city, with one exception, that the garrison of Vicksburg was not involved in the operations which defeated them. I will simply mention them in the order in which they occurred. First was General Grant's advance from Memphis and Grand Junction, via Holly Springs, toward Grenada. This was defeated by the raids of Van Dorn and Forrest upon Grant's communications [December 20th and December 15th to January 3d]. He was forced to retire or starve. Next came General Sherman's attempt to get in rear of Vicksburg by the Chickasaw Bayou road, which ran from the Yazoo River bottom to the Walnut hills, six miles above the city. His column of thirty thousand men was defeated and driven back with dreadful slaughter by General S. D. Lee with one brigade of the Vieksburg garrison [December 20th to January 3d]. After this General
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 7.83 (search)
ith's army was called to Harrodsburg, where a junction of the two forces was effected, and where a position was selected to receive Buell's attack ;--this, however, not being made, Bragg was enabled to take measures for an immediate retrograde. Forrest was at once dispatched by forced marches to take position at Murfreesboro‘, and prepare it for occupancy by the retreating Confederates. The conduct of the retreat was intrusted to Polk. Our army fell back first to Camp Dick Robinson, whencenction of the Confederate Government for a movement into middle Tennessee. Returning to Knoxville, General Bragg made preparations with the utmost rapidity for the advance to Murfreesboro‘, where General Breckinridge was already posted, and General Forrest was operating with a strong, active cavalry force. Our headquarters were advanced to Tullahoma on the 14th of November, and on the 26th to Murfreesboro‘. Notwithstanding long marches and fighting, the condition of the troops was very good; <
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Manoeuvring Bragg out of Tennessee. (search)
ard Chattanooga, the strategic importance of which, as controlling Confederate railroad communication between the East and West, had rendered it the objective point of all the campaigns of the armies of the Ohio and the Cumberland. As the contending armies stood facing each other on the 20th of June, 1863, General Bragg estimated the effective strength of his army at 30,449 infantry, 13,962 cavalry, and 2254 artillery. Polk and Hardee commanded his two corps of infantry, and Wheeler and Forrest the cavalry. Deducting the garrisons of Nashville and points Map of the Tullahoma campaign. north, and the Reserve Corps, 12,575, to be used in emergency, Rosecrans had at the same date present for duty, equipped, 40,746 infantry, 6806 cavalry, and 3065 artillery, for an offensive campaign. Having received full and accurate descriptions of the fortifications at Tullahoma, where a part of Polk's corps was intrenched behind formidable breastworks, protected by an abatis of fallen tree
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 8.89 (search)
distances to march. Croxton's brigade, of Brannan's division, met Forrest's cavalry on the Reed's Bridge road, and drove it back on the infasing in all 18,794 infantry and artillery, with 3500 cavalry under Forrest; to Longstreet he gave the left wing, consisting of the corps of Bn out and put in reserve. Wheeler's cavalry covered our left, and Forrest had been sent, at my request, to our right. The Confederates wereleburne fifteen minutes later, according to the order for attack. Forrest dismounted Armstrong's division of cavalry to keep abreast of Brecotly engaged on the left, by the advance of the right. At 3 P. M. Forrest reported to me that a strong column was approaching from Rossvilley was spent in burying the dead and gathering up captured stores. Forrest, with his usual promptness, was early in the saddle, and saw that rder and confusion pervaded the broken ranks struggling to get on. Forrest sent back word to Bragg that every hour was worth a thousand men.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 8.91 (search)
d posted them near Brannan's left. Some of Van Cleve's troops joined them, and fragments of Negley's. General Thomas, ignorant of these movements and of the disaster to the right of the Union army, had again been attacked by Breckinridge and Forrest. They were again in Baird's rear with increased force. Thomas's reserve brigades, Willich, Grose, and Van Derveer, hurried to meet the attack. After a fierce struggle the Confederates were beaten back. Thomas, expecting the promised assistanmy mission, full of hope that the day was not lost, we soon reached the identical spot on the Dry Valley road where we had left Sheridan and Davis. Strange to say, no Confederate cavalry or infantry appeared, and there seemed still no pursuit. Forrest, Wheeler, Wharton, Roddey,--half the cavalry of the Confederacy,--were with Bragg, yet no cavalry apparently came through the gap of a mile or more to pursue or follow our retreating forces on the right. At our recent fight at Murfreesboro‘, Wh
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Reenforcing Thomas at Chickamauga. (search)
, he again started his column and pushed rapidly forward. I was then sent to bring up Colonel McCook's brigade, and put it in position to watch the movements of the enemy, to keep open the Lafayette road, and to cover the open fields between that point and the position held by Thomas. This brigade remained there the rest of the day. Our skirmishers had not gone far when they came upon Thomas's field-hospital, at Cloud's house, then swarming with the enemy. They came from the same body of Forrest's cavalry that had fired on us from the wood. They were quickly driven out, and our men were warmly welcomed with cheers from dying and wounded men. A little farther on we were met by a staff-officer sent by General Thomas to discover whether we were friends or enemies; he did not know whence friends could be coming, and the enemy appeared to be approaching from all directions. All of this shattered Army of the Cumberland left on the field was with Thomas; but not more than one-fourth
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