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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 33 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 23, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General Forrest of operations against W. Sooy Smith in February, 1864. (search)
and troops of my command for their gallant and meritorious conduct, for their energy, endurance and courage; and it would afford me pleasure to mention individual instances of daring and dash which came under my own observation, but for fear of doing apparent injustice to others who, in other parts of the field, perhaps did as well. My escort deserves especial mention. Commanded by Lieutenant Thomas S. Tate on 21st and by its commander, Captain Jackson, on the 22d, its battle-flag was foremost in the fray, sustaining its reputation as one of the best fighting cavalry companies in the service. I also desire to acknowledge, as I have often done before, my indebtedness to Major J. P. Strange, my Adjutant-General; Captain Charles W. Anderson, my Aid-de-Camp, and Lieutenant Tate, Assistant Inspector-General, for prompt and faithful services rendered in the delivery and execution of all my orders on the field. All of which is respectfully submitted. N. B. Forrest, Major-General.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Forrest's report of operations in December, 1863. (search)
n. Colonel Faulkner, who is to cross at Raleigh, has with him about 800 men. I hope to hear that they have gotten out safely by to-morrow. If I could have stayed there ten days longer, I could have almost doubled that number. I brought out my wagon train and artillery safely,. although I have never experienced such weather and roads. My stock, however, is much jaded, and requires rest. I have a lot of prisoners, and General Tuttle has signified his willingness to exchange man for man. Would I be justified in doing so? I think of moving my headquarters to Oxford, and will encamp my command in Panola in order to organize it and arm and equip it. The locality is a good one for forage, unless my command can be supplied with forage from the railroad. If so, I would prefer to be south of the Tallahatchie to organize. I will advise you positively of my location as soon as made. I am, General, very respectfully, your obedient servant, N. B. Forrest, Major-General Commanding.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
en D. Lee writes us, after the form containing his article had been printed and consequently too late to make the change, that he desired the figures given in General Forrest's report, published in our January number, substituted for the report of his loss, which he took from General Jordan's Forrest and his campaigns. General ForrForrest and his campaigns. General Forrest says: The killed and wounded of the enemy who fell into our hands amount to over one hundred * * * and one hundred and sixty-two prisoners * * *; and it is but reasonable to suppose, and a low estimate to place, their loss in killed, wounded and missing at eight hundred. The Lee monument Association has done the secretaryGeneral Forrest says: The killed and wounded of the enemy who fell into our hands amount to over one hundred * * * and one hundred and sixty-two prisoners * * *; and it is but reasonable to suppose, and a low estimate to place, their loss in killed, wounded and missing at eight hundred. The Lee monument Association has done the secretary of the Southern Historical Society the honor of electing him to the secretaryship of the Association, made vacant by the resignation of Colonel S. Bassett French. We propose to do all in our power to push this grand work to completion, and bespeak the active co-operation of admirers of the great chieftan every-where. We have
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
ooks that have been written by Southern men since the war, yet one is surprised to find omitted from the list given Rev. Dr. A. T. Bledsoe's able discussion of the secession question in Is Davis a Traitor? Rev. Dr. Dabney's life of Stonewall Jackson; John Esten Cooke's Life of Lee, and Military biography of Stonewall Jackson; Colonel Charles C. Jones' Siege of Savannah, Chatham artillery, Life of Commodore Tatnall, &c.; General Basil W. Duke's History of Morgan's cavalry ; General Jordan's Forrest and his campaigns, Admiral Semmes' Service Afloat; Boykin's Life of Howell Cobb; Handy's United States Bonds; Stevenson's Southern side of Andersonville; Brevier's First and Second Confederate Missouri brigades; Hodge's First Kentucky brigade; Wilkinson's Blockade Runner; Alfriend's Life of Jefferson Davis; Miss Emily Mason's Popular life of General R. E. Lee; Hotchkiss and Allan's Chancellorsville with their superb maps; General J. A. Early's Memoirs of the last year of the War; Miss Mary
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General W. T. Sherman's visit to the Misses L------at Canton, Miss., in February, 1864. (search)
Smith was marching to the same place, ordered General S. D. Lee to march with thirty-five hundred cavalry and unite his force with an equal force under General N. Bedford Forrest, who was collecting his cavalry near West Point, Mississippi, to oppose General Smith. When General Smith reached West Point, he found Forrest on his rForrest on his right flank at Sookatouchie creek, four miles west of West Point, and Stephen D. Lee preparing to cross Tibbee creek, four miles south of West Point, which creek was deep and could not be forded. General Smith retreated precipitately, pursued by General Forrest, who was nearest the line of his retreat, and who succeeded in strikiGeneral Forrest, who was nearest the line of his retreat, and who succeeded in striking General Smith's rear guard a blow at Okalona and capturing six light field pieces. General Sherman had only one brigade of cavalry at Meridian, and without General Smith's force, he could not keep his communications open with his base of supplies, or subsist his army on the prairie region of East Mississippi; so he was compel
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate flag. (search)
g is easily made and is without the complication of any painting, which, besides the difficulty of correct execution, soon rots the bunting. The proportions, while most pleasing to the eye, possess the virtue of simplicity — the white below and on side of union being same width as the red bar. They have been approved by some of the best artists in the Confederacy, and after a careful examination have been pronounced correct by some of the most experienced officers of the navy, such as Commodore Forrest, Captain Raphael Semmes, Captain S. S. Lee, Captain Mason and Captain W. H. Parker, the latter being at the head of the Confederate States Naval Academy. Your committee has been furnished by the Quartermaster General with a model flag, made in strict accordance therewith. It may be proper to add that this improvement of the flag is advocated by almost the entire Richmond press. I hope it will be the pleasure of your committee to recommend the passage of the bill, and that it will be
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Shiloh--report of L. D. Sandidge, Inspector-General, Louisiana division. (search)
ught on the same field. How that was done let history tell. I am certain I saw General Beauregard leading Mouton's regiment of our brigade in person, when you and Mouton, with the entire line, attacked the enemy's centre, and again two more of the brigades (Anderson's and Pond's) prolonged on the line of Cheatham at Shiloh church, again and again advanced by successive alignments, you and staff carrying the battle flags, repelling every attack of the fresh army of Monday (see Basil Duke's Forrest's Cavalry — foot note on Shiloh), till the Confederate army, moving in regular order, retired leisurely by the passage of lines from the field towards Corinth. Breckinridge and his Kentuckians will remember when their brigade was left on the field, interposed to secure retreat, a staff officer came through the rain and mire with General Ruggles' compliments and message that not one Louisianian would move a pace in retreat at the peril of a life in the brigade — the entire division to reinf
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the Powhatan troop of cavalry in 1861. (search)
Here the connection of the writer with this fine body of men ceased; he was ordered to report to his old commander, General Beauregard, at Corinth, Mississippi--remaining on staff duty until assigned as Colonel of the Second Confederate cavalry--a regiment numbering on its rolls over one thousand men. Assigned to the command of the cavalry of the right wing of the army (General Polk), the march was made from Mississippi to Kentucky, and throughout that campaign (four months of it with General Forrest); then again with General Beauregard in South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, to close of war. Lieutenant Charles Old was elected Captain, and so remained until his promotion as Major, when Lieutenant Joseph Hobson succeeded him. The record of the Powhatan troop throughout the war was a brilliant one; but from this date (1862) comes most properly from those officers immediately in command. Their old Captain, who loved and admired them, was in the far West on duty, and never again
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Facts connected with the concentration of the army of the Mississippi before Shiloh, April, 1862. (search)
t permit me to enter more freely into this question of the delay in reaching Shiloh. In order to do so properly, I will quote from memoranda prepared some time ago, for a forthcoming Memoir of Leonidas Polk. It was claimed by some that the failure to attack the enemy on the 5th, the day appointed, was due to the delay of General Polk in getting his command up to the point of concentration — Mickey's House. We find no mention of it in any official document, but in a work Life of General Forrest by General Jordon. partly written by the officer then acting as the Adjutant-General of the army, it appears as a distinct statement. The position occupied by this officer gives to his statements at least a semi-official force. To fully understand the point involved it is necessary to see what were General Polk's orders. Section 3 of the Special Orders as to the movements of troops towards Shiloh (page 189 1st Vol. Official Reports of Battles, published by Confederate Congress in 186
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Forrest's operations against Smith and Grierson. (search)
The result of the campaign has been thus far satisfactory, and we have not as yet seen the end of it. I shall send General Forrest, without delay, into the western district, to break up the Federal elections proposed to be held there within the neicient and successful management. Respectfully, your obedient servant, L. Polk, Lieutanant-General. Refort of General Forrest.headquarters Starkville, Miss., February 26, 1864. General — I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your lettn Sunday morning last at Ellis's Bridge, or Succartouchee creek, three miles south of West Point, in front of which Colonel Forrest's brigade was posted to prevent the enemy from crossing. After a brisk engagement of an hour and a half the enemy rurning the bridge behind them at New Albany, and retreating rapidly towards Memphis, with Gholson still in pursuit. I am, General, Very respectfully, your obedient servant, [Signed] N. B. Forrest, Major-General. To Lieutenant-General L. Pol
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