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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 224 2 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 135 7 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 128 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 44 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 36 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 24 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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on that field. He commanded two brigades on Forrest's expedition of April 12, 1864, when the lattble to restrain the massacre. He served with Forrest at Nashville and led Hood's cavalry at the bate army to make good its escape. He was with Forrest when the latter was defeated by Wilson on the's defeat of Rosecrans' army at Chickamauga. Forrest was in full command on the right, while Wheelelf behind the fortifications of Chattanooga, Forrest was ordered in the direction of Loudon and Knew remaining stores not burned or captured by Forrest having been removed by railroad to Nashville,ts and barges yet unloaded for want of room. Forrest captured U. S. Gunboat 55 and three transportthe transport Venus, loaded with stores which Forrest had transferred from the steamer Mazeppa, captured at Fort Heiman, and also some of Forrest's 20-pounder Parrott guns, which his exhausted horsees. The evacuation of Johnsonville after Forrest's successful raid The evacuation of Johnson[8 more...]
x. At the same time, General Frederick Steele had advanced from Pensacola against Blakely, a little farther north than the Spanish Fort, and had captured it on the afternoon of Lee's surrender. On the morning of May 12th the Union forces under General Gordon Granger crossed the bay and found that the Confederate General Dabney H. Maury had marched out with his whole force. Maury succeeded in reaching Meridian in safety. During these operations the celebrated Confederate cavalry General Nathan B. Forrest had been defeated by the Federal cavalry under General James H. Wilson, and Selma, Alabama, with its fortifications, foundries, and workshops, had fallen into his hands. He entered Montgomery the same day that Granger entered Mobile. Taylor surrendered 42,293 men, the largest aggregation anywhere laying down their arms at the close of the war. Furl that Banner! True, 'tis gory, Yet 'tis wreathed around with glory, And 'twill live in song and story Though its folds are in the du
ons. Thomas T. Eckert became President of the Western Union Telegraph Company. Grenville M. Dodge, Chief Engineer of the Union Pacific, built thousands of miles of railroads, opening up the Western empire. Brevet Lieut.-Colonel Harrison Gray Otis: twice wounded; Brig.-Gen. In Spanish War, Maj.-Gen. In Philippines. Brevet Major George Haven Putnam, 176th New York, prisoner at Libby and Danville in the winter of 1864-65. Chief of Scouts Henry Watterson, C. S. A., aide-de-camp to General Forrest, chief of Scouts under General Jcs. E. Johnston. Andrew Carnegie superintended Military railways and Government Telegraph lines in 1861. Lieut.-General Nathan B. Forrest, C. S. A., entered as private; Lieut.-Col., 1861, Maj.-Gen., 1864. Brevet Brig.-General Thomas T. Eckert, superintendent of Military Telegraph; Asst. Sec. Of War, 1864-66. Maj.-General Grenville M. Dodge, wounded before Atlanta; succeeded Rosecrans in the Department of Missouri. —naturally emphasizes, in it
osed of the divisions of Rodes, Gordon and Ramseur, and three battalions of light artillery under command of Brigadier-General Long. 15Richard H. AndersonS. CarolinaGen. R. E. LeeJune 1, 1864.May 31, 1864.June 1, 1864. Commanded Longstreet's corps while he was disabled by wounds encountered in the Battle of the Wilderness. 16Ambrose P. StewartTennesseeGen. J. E. JohnstonJune 23, 1864.June 23, 1864.  Corps composed of the divisions of French, Loring and Walthall, Army of the West. 17Nathan B. ForrestTennesseeGen. BeauregardFeb. 28, 1865.Feb. 28, 1865.March 2, 1865. Command composed of the cavalry divisions of Chalmers, Jackson and Buford, McCulloch's Second Missouri cavalry regiment as a special scouting force, and the Mississippi militia; Army of the West. 18Wade HamptonS. CarolinaGen. J. E. Johnston    Commanding cavalry in General Joseph E. Johnston's army during General Sherman's march through the Carolinas, and Butler's division of cavalry from the Army of Northern Virginia.
Sept. 9, 1863. Jan. 25, 1864. In 1864 in command of the reserve forces of Georgia. 64John A. WhartonTexasGen. B. BraggNov. 12, 1863.Nov. 10, 1863. Jan. 25, 1864. Commanding division in Wheeler's cavalry corps, Army of Tennessee. 65William T. MartinMississippiGen. B. BraggNov. 12, 1863.Nov. 10, 1863. Jan. 25, 1864. Commanding cavalry corps in East Tennessee, under General Longstreet; subsequently a division in Wheeler's cavalry corps, composed of the brigades of Morgan and Iverson. 66Nathan B. ForrestTennesseeGen. J. E. JohnstonDec. 4, 1863.Dec. 4, 1863. Jan. 25, 1864. Promoted Lieutenant-General February 28, 1865; assigned to the command of all cavalry in West Tennessee and North Mississippi, consisting of those of his own brigade and those of Chalmers, McCulloch, Richardson, Bell and Jeffrey Forrest; Lyon's brigade was afterwards added; the whole was organized into two divisions, commanded respectively by Chalmers and Buford. 67Charles W. FieldKentuckyLt. Gen. LongstreetFeb. 12,
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.), Brigadier-Generals of the Confederate States Army, alphabetically arranged. (search)
th, 13th and 14th Alabama regiments. 136Forrest, Nathan B.TennesseeGen. E. K. SmithJuly 21, 1862.Ju2.April 22, 1863. Commanding cavalry brigade, Forrest's command; subsequently commanded cavalry div7th, 8th and 12th regiments Kentucky cavalry, Forrest's division; subsequently in command of the De. 3, 1863.Jan. 25, 1864. Commanded brigade in Forrest's cavalry. 367Rodes, R. E.AlabamaGen. J. E. 71Rucker, E. W.      Commanded brigade in General Forrest's cavalry, composed of the 7th, 12th, 14th and 15th Tennessee regiments, Forrest's old regiment and the 7th Alabama and 5th Mississippi regi of Northern Virginia. 402Starke, Peter B. Gen. Forrest    Commanding brigade in Chalmers' division, Forrest's cavalry, corps. 403Starke, William E.LouisianaGen. T. J. JacksonAug. 6, 1862.Aug. 6, 1 Commanded 1st cavalry brigade, 1st division, Forrest's cavalry command. 441Walker, H. H.Virginiaagg's army, and commanding brigades of Hagan, Forrest, Wharton and Morgan. 459Whitfield, F.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
Samuel J. Winn being especially distinguished among the officers. At the same time the First and Second Georgia cavalry regiments were earning their spurs with Forrest in Tennessee. Part of the First, under Col. J. J. Morrison, and the Second, under Col. W. J. Lawton, with Colonel Wharton's Texas rangers, formed the main part of the cavalry brigade of about 1,400, with which Forrest attacked an equal force at Murfreesboro on July 13th and captured the entire Federal command. To Colonel Morrison, with a portion of his regiment, was given the duty of storming the courthouse, and after two or three hours of brisk fighting he compelled its surrender. Lieutrmed the jail with equal success. Colonel Lawton, with the Second regiment and the Tennessee and Kentucky companies, assailed the second camp of the enemy. Said Forrest: The Georgians, under Colonel Dunlop and Major Harper, made a gallant charge almost to the mouth of the cannon. After fighting them in front two or three hou
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
ved in Tennessee and north Mississippi. It was at Jackson in the army of Gen. J. E. Johnston; served in the Meridian campaign in 1864, and through the summer in Forrest's command, accompanying that famous soldier into Tennessee during the Hood campaign. The Campbell Siege Artillery, Capt. C. G. Campbell, served on the Georgia It was sent to east Tennessee in 1861. In July, 1862, before Bragg entered upon his campaign into Kentucky, it participated in the brilliant cavalry victory of Forrest at Murfreesboro, forming in connection with the Second Georgia cavalry the greater part of the Confederate force on that occasion. This regiment participated in . M. Ison, (F) Thomas H. Jordon, (G) W. D. Grant, (H) W. H. Chapman, (I) James W. Mayo, (K) J. C. Dunlop. This regiment was, like the First Georgia cavalry, with Forrest at Murfreesboro in July, 1862. It participated subsequently in the Murfreesboro, Chickamauga and Knoxville campaigns; also in the Atlanta campaign in Wheeler's c
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
armor of the Atlanta would have been ineffectual against the guns of the two monitors. In the spring of 1863 there occurred in north Georgia one of the most celebrated cavalry exploits of the war, the capture of Col. A. D. Streight by Gen. Nathan B. Forrest. Bragg at this time occupied with the army of Tennessee the Tullahoma line and Rosecrans was at Murfreesboro, both armies being quiet for the time, though their cavalry kept busy. On the night of April 26th, Colonel Streight set out from Tuscumbia, Ala., with 1,500 men, mostly mounted, with orders to cut the railroad in Georgia below Rome. He was promptly followed by a cavalry command under General Forrest. A battle was fought at Driver's gap, Sand mountain, in which Capt. W. H. Forrest, a brother of the general, was severely wounded—it was feared mortally, but he recovered and was in the field again in 1864. Streight, driven from this position, pushed on toward the Georgia line; but on the next day he was overtaken at Bla
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
l of Georgia, as well as one of the great battles of the war. On August 20th, Gen. Braxton Bragg, with headquarters at Chattanooga, had to defend the line of the Tennessee river with an effective force of about 35,000 men, infantry and artillery, embraced in the corps commanded by Lieut.-Gen. Leonidas Polk, and the corps lately under Hardee, but to which Lieut.-Gen. D. H. Hill had just been assigned by President Davis. About 10,000 cavalry were under command of Gens. Joseph Wheeler and N. B. Forrest. The divisions of Polk's corps were commanded by Maj.-Gens. Benjamin F. Cheatham and Thomas C. Hindman; the divisions of Hill's corps by Maj.-Gens. Patrick R. Cleburne and Alexander P. Stewart. Brig.-Gen. John K. Jackson, of Georgia, commanded a brigade of Cheatham's division, including besides two Mississippi regiments the second battalion of the First Confederate, Maj. James Clark Gordon; Fifth regiment, Col. Charles P. Daniel, and the Second battalion sharpshooters, Maj. Richard H. W
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