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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 224 2 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 135 7 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 128 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 44 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 36 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 24 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Nathan B. Forrest or search for Nathan B. Forrest in all documents.

Your search returned 113 results in 5 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—eastern Tennessee. (search)
ille, Rover, Unionville, and Middleton, while Forrest remains at Spring Hill, thus defending the ex, between Gordon's Mills and Crawfish Spring; Forrest had ordered Pegram's division to defend as lon's. Wheeler was watching McCook's movements; Forrest, called back from the left with Armstrong's dderates. Indeed, the outposts established by Forrest on his arrival, so as to cover the two branchnst them, which the arrival of Wilson enabled Forrest to do. Wilson, hastening to the assistance of Forrest's left, bore upon a hill to the south-west of the road to Alexander's Bridge; then, takingen his right. Walker, who was the nearest to Forrest, received at eleven o'clock the order to go tas coming back after having picked up some of Forrest's scouts. The increasing sound of the battlesy victory, which the reconnoissances made by Forrest already enabled the Confederates to consider the opportunity it allows to go by. While Forrest's messengers are going to urge Polk and Bragg[61 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—the siege of Chattanooga. (search)
at that army has already crossed this river. Forrest, after only one day of rest, receives on the the reserve of the expeditionary corps, while Forrest, joining, at Cleveland, Hodge's brigade, moverd, follow him up and compel him to retreat. Forrest, fortunately for Byrd, has been too quick, anVan Dorn has bequeathed to that cavalry. But Forrest, who was recalled that very evening to Charlef September. Perhaps he has a grudge against Forrest for being too quick to pursue the enemy on thhough he is obliged to send away a portion of Forrest's cavalry, whose horses are either foundered the positions occupied fifteen days before by Forrest the three brigades that have been entrusted t Besides, this corps has lost its commander. Forrest, smitten by Bragg, as we have said, with a viooga, did not think of disturbing that army. Forrest's horsemen have followed westward Wheeler's grt that had replaced the redoubt before which Forrest had halted on the 22d of September. On the n
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—the Third winter. (search)
ortly thereafter an important reinforcement. Forrest, sent off by Bragg, had arrived on the 15th oFerguson's and Ross' brigades, accompanied by Forrest, meet at Ripley a portion of Chalmers' brigadback in great haste, leaving the way clear to Forrest. To cover this manoeuvre, Lee bears to thele, divert the attention of the Federals, and Forrest arrives at Jackson without having been molestt toward the north-west to bar the passage to Forrest as soon as Smith's manoeuvre shall have deterr task is to detain him as long as possible. Forrest with the rest of his troops shall follow the a ferryboat, the only one found at Estenaula, Forrest divides his forces into two columns to attackderals the next morning by the Bolivar road. Forrest will follow the direct Estenaula road to fall'clock the bed of the bridge is restored, and Forrest's entire column crosses over. Smith and Mi the Tallahatchie, on the other side of which Forrest, henceforth at the head of a complete divisio[13 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the war in the South-West. (search)
h brigade of cavalry, under Ferguson, was to join him shortly. Farther north, Forrest had collected at Como and Oxford the numerous recruits which he had brought fr the latter city Grierson's strong division keeping constantly on the watch in Forrest's vicinity. It numbered nine thousand two hundred and thirty-one men and sevelessly explored this route. The movement of Sooy Smith would necessarily draw Forrest after him, and by a powerful diversion prevent him from troubling Sherman's ma for the remainder of the army. In order to further divert the attention of Forrest and compel him to disperse his troops, Sherman resolved to have a detachment ohe Mississippi to defend the posts en ├ęchelon on that river, all threatened by Forrest with the cruel fate of Fort Pillow. It was, however, decided to proceed. Eo Alexandria and issued orders there to send to Fort Pillow, recently taken by Forrest, a part of the division stationed near the mouth of Red River, had returned to
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Addenda by the Editor. (search)
a CavalryCol. M. W. Hannon. Roddey's cavalry regimentLieut.-col. W. A. Johnson. Unorganized troopsCapt. W. R. Julian. Georgia BatteryCapt. C. B. Ferrell. Forrest's cavalry division. Brig.-gen. Nathan B. Forrest. First Brigade. Col. G. G. Dibrell reported in command, July 20. Brig.-gen. F. C. Armstrong. 3d ArkaBrig.-gen. Nathan B. Forrest. First Brigade. Col. G. G. Dibrell reported in command, July 20. Brig.-gen. F. C. Armstrong. 3d ArkansasCol. A. W. Hobson. 2d KentuckyLieut.-col. T. G. Woodward. 1st [6th] TennesseeCol. J. T. Wheeler. McDonald's battalionMaj. Charles McDonald. Escort companyCapt. John Bradley. Second Brigade. Col. N. N. Cox. 4th TennesseeMaj. W. S. McLemore. 8th [13th] TennesseeLieut.-col. F. H. Daugherty. 9th [19th] TennesseeCogade.Lieut.-col. William A. Johnson. 5th Alabama. 53d Alabama. Forrest's (Tennessee) Regiment. Ferrell's (Georgia) Battery. Forrest's corps. Brig.-gen. N. B. Forrest. Armstrong's division. from return for August 31, 1863, and reports. Brig.-gen. F. C. Armstrong. Armstrong's Brigade. Col. J. T. Wheeler.