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frightened An officer who escaped from Libby brevet Brigadier-General A. D. Streight General Forrest received the thanks of the Confederate Congress when he captured General A. D. Streight, atMississippi, and reached Tuscumbia, Alabama, April 24th. General Dodge was to have detained General Forrest, but failed. Streight's command was mounted on mules borrowed from the wagon-trains or imp to riding. From Tuscumbia he went to Moulton and then to Dug's Gap, where he ambushed some of Forrest's men, wounded his brother, W. H. Forrest, and captured two pieces of artillery. After anotherW. H. Forrest, and captured two pieces of artillery. After another skirmish on Hog Mountain, in which the Confederates were repulsed, he proceeded to Blountsville, Alabama, and then toward Gadsden. All of this time there was continuous skirmishing in the rain, and much of his powder became worthless. He attempted to reach Rome, Georgia, but Forrest overtook him and the force was surrendered May 3, 1863. There was much excitement in the South over this raid
ion, valuable and greatly needed medical and surgical supplies were captured from the more bountifully supplied Northerners. Dr. J. B. Cowan, medical director of Forrest's cavalry, stated to the writer, that on one of Forrest's raids into western Tennessee, they captured and brought out a large wagon train, in which were three fouForrest's raids into western Tennessee, they captured and brought out a large wagon train, in which were three four-mule army wagons loaded with medical supplies, the remainder of which, after supplying his command very bountifully, were forwarded to Atlanta, Georgia. The value of that was estimated by Dr. George S. Blackie, medical purveyor there, to be fully equivalent to what would have cost the department at least one hundred and fifty thtely following an amputation just above the knee. Other surgeons reported good success or luck, among whom could be recalled Dr. J. B. Cowan, medical director, Forrest's cavalry; Dr. J. M. Keller, medical director, Trans- Confederate field-hospital at Cedar Mountain, August, 1862 The Confederate loss at Cedar Mountain, know
ion, valuable and greatly needed medical and surgical supplies were captured from the more bountifully supplied Northerners. Dr. J. B. Cowan, medical director of Forrest's cavalry, stated to the writer, that on one of Forrest's raids into western Tennessee, they captured and brought out a large wagon train, in which were three fouForrest's raids into western Tennessee, they captured and brought out a large wagon train, in which were three four-mule army wagons loaded with medical supplies, the remainder of which, after supplying his command very bountifully, were forwarded to Atlanta, Georgia. The value of that was estimated by Dr. George S. Blackie, medical purveyor there, to be fully equivalent to what would have cost the department at least one hundred and fifty thtely following an amputation just above the knee. Other surgeons reported good success or luck, among whom could be recalled Dr. J. B. Cowan, medical director, Forrest's cavalry; Dr. J. M. Keller, medical director, Trans- Confederate field-hospital at Cedar Mountain, August, 1862 The Confederate loss at Cedar Mountain, know
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
was fought at Driver's gap, Sand mountain, in which Capt. W. H. Forrest, a brother of the general, was severely wounded—it wre that a young Alabama girl, Emma Sanson, mounting behind Forrest, at imminent peril of her own life, guided him to a ford, rsuit. Near Gadsden there was a desperate fight between Forrest's men and Streight's command, in which the Federals were wure of the ferryboat, and after crossing it was found that Forrest was ahead of them in the race for Rome and the advance guao get possession of the bridge. On the morning of May 3d, Forrest, with his command reduced to about 500 men, overtook Streior forces of the enemy. While the battle was progressing, Forrest audaciously dispatched an officer to Streight, demanding ider of his whole force. Streight parleyed for awhile, but Forrest with an air of impatience, declaring that he could wait noiers dashed off to obey his orders, as he had given them. Forrest then announced that within ten minutes the signal gun woul
ed by General Forrest at 4 a. m. of the 21st of August, 1864, and by his quick and bold assault he captured 400 prisoners and 300 horses and mules. Major-General Washburn, the Federal department commander, escaped in his night clothes. To make this daring raid, Forrest left the immediate front of Maj.-Gen. A. J. Smith at Oxford, Miss., who had with him a force of 4,800 cavalry and a large body of infantry and artillery. The troops accompanying Forrest were the company commanded by Capt. W. H. Forrest; Col. J. J. Neely's Tennessee regiment; the Second Missouri; the Fourteenth Tennessee, Colonel White; the Eighteenth Mississippi; the Twelfth and Fifteenth Tennessee, Lieutenant-Colonel Logwood and Lieut.-Col. Jesse Forrest; Bell's Tennessee brigade, with a section of Morton's battery, Lieutenant Sale in reserve, and not engaged in the city proper. This considerable force was withdrawn from the front of Smith without arousing a suspicion on the part of the Federal commander, for the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.21 (search)
oops in the city, a great many of whom were negroes and hundred-day men. Forrest ordered the troops to be closed up, and the regimental commanders were called together and each given definite instructions as to what he was expected to do. Captain W. H. Forrest, a brother of the general, was sent in advance with forty men to capture the pickets, if possible, but in any event to dash into the city by the nearest route to the Gayoso Hotel, where it was known a number of federal officers were quartered. Colonel Neely was ordered to charge into the camps of the hundred-day men with the Second Missouri, Fourteenth Tennessee and the Eighteenth Mississippi, while Colonel Logwood, with the Twelfth and Fifteenth Tennessee, followed Captain Forrest to the Gayoso Hotel. Colonel Jesse Forrest charged through Lauderdale street to Union, with special orders to capture General Washburne, while the Second Tennessee and Russell's regients and the parrot guns were left in the rear to cover the ret
44, 348, 350; III., 124, 252, 257, 326, 330, 332, 338, 344; IV., 20, 34, 77, 116, 134, 137, 138, 139, 144, 145, 158, 160, 161, 16:3, 256, 262, 273 seq., 278 seq., 280, 282; VII., 145, 242; VIII., 206, 275, 290; IX., 247; X., 21,48,249,278. Forrest, W. H., VII., 145. Forrest, Tenn., I., 356, 358. Forrest, , C. S. S., I., 356. Forster, W., VIII., 360. Forsyth, G. W, IV., 310. Forsyth, J., IV., 260, 261. Forsyth, J. W., X., 233. Forsyth, Mo., I., 350. Forrest, Tenn., I., 356, 358. Forrest, , C. S. S., I., 356. Forster, W., VIII., 360. Forsyth, G. W, IV., 310. Forsyth, J., IV., 260, 261. Forsyth, J. W., X., 233. Forsyth, Mo., I., 350. Forsythe, T. W., VIII., 39. Fort Abercrombie, Minn., VIII., 79. Fort Adams, Miss., VI., 149. Fort Albany, Va., V., 94. Fort Anderson, Ky., II., 350. Fort Anderson, N. C., III., 342. Fort Barker, Ala., II., 167. Fort Barrancas, Fla.: I., 4, 86; II., 351; VIII., 157. Fort Beauregard, S. C.: VI., 58, 148, 270, 310. Fort Bennett, Va., V., 95. Fort Blakely, Ala.: III., 344; VI., 260; captured, IX., 247. Fort Bowyer, Ala., VI., 24
portions of Mississippi unfavorable to army movements, II., 142; Army of, II., 168; Confederate raids in, II., 168; Department of, II., 296, 321; Federal supply centre in, III, 253; destruction of saltpeter works in, in 1863, IV., 157; ruins of saltpeter works in, IV., 157 seq.; copper mines of, V., 166; army roads of, in north, VIII., 36; defense of, X., 92. Tennessee troops, Confederate: Artillery: First, L, 356; Camp A, V., 65. Cavalry: First, L, 358; Il, 342, 344; Ninth, VII., 21; Forrest's, L, 356. Infantry: First, VII, 272; IX., 311; X., 156; Second, I., 250, 354; X., 156; Third, I., 350, 358; Fourth, X., 156; Eighth, losses at Stone's River, Tenn., X., 158; losses at Chickamauga, Ga., X., 158; Ninth, I., 358; Tenth, I., 356, 358; VII., 272; Twelfth, I., 354; losses at Stone's River, Tenn., X., 158; Thirteenth, I., 354; Fifteenth, I., 354; VII., 272; Sixteenth, losses at Stone's River, Tenn., X., 158; Seventeenth, I., 356; Eighteenth, I., 358; Nineteenth, I., 356; Twentiet