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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Bob Forrest or search for Bob Forrest in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
her love, and how I revere her memory. It would be such a happiness to be able to tell her, but she died soon after the war. My dear old mammy was a type, there were others like her, and all of them were loved and respected by their master's children. I remember a circumstance regarding my friend, Captain Sam Henderson, and his servant, Henry, which illustrates also the love for the master the negro always showed. Captain Henderson commanded the scouts, which were so valuable to General Forrest. On one occasion he was in camp near Byhalia, Miss., with about twenty of his men, while the others were watching the enemy. Suddenly and unexpectedly a regiment of Yankees surrounded the party and all were made prisoners, except Captain Henderson, who escaped on foot. They were all taken to Germantown, Tenn., not far distant, and confined in a house. During the night Henry slipped out with both of his master's horses, and the following day rode into the Confederate lines. Of c
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
or and the imprecation of the vanquished. A mere boy, I left my old Kentucky home to follow the plume of General John H. Morgan, the beau sabreur who rode far into the enemy's country, greeting the sons of the morning with a strange new flag. In person General Morgan was notably graceful and handsome. Six feet in height, his form was perfect, a rare combination of grace, activity and strength. The prince of Kentucky cavaliers, Morgan was the peer of the immortals-Stuart and Hampton, Forrest and Wheeler. Associated with him, always second in command, was Basil W. Duke, the Baron Henry of the youthful cavalrymen—the flower of old Kentucky. Tactics and Strategetics. While Morgan was bold in thought and action, he neglected no precaution that would insure success or avert disaster. His rapidly formed plans, promptly and brilliantly executed, surprised his friends and confounded his foes. He was the originator of the far-reaching raid, and the author of a system of tact
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.68 (search)
l what I saw and did from my standpoint, which was not very far right or left of our colors. Bob Forrest was the color-bearer. John Cose, of Company I, was on his right front rank, and I was on his was shot through seventeen times, and the staff cut in two. I don't think our color-bearer, Bob Forrest, was hurt. I was slightly wounded in the wrist and foot, and it seemed to me that most every will kill the last one of us, and that we must charge them. He gave the command to charge. Bob Forrest went forward several paces in front and waited for the line of battle to come up, and Lieutenant Henry St. Clair, of Company I, ran up to him and said, Bob Forrest, why in the h—ll don't you go forward with the flag; if you won't go give it to me, and started for it. But Forrest, as brave a Forrest, as brave a man as ever lived, said to him, You shan't have it. I will carry this flag as far as any man; bring your line up and we will all go up together. They did come up, and took the fence and drove the en
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
Cutshaw, Col. W. E., Tribute to 372 De Leon, T. C., 167 Dickens, Capt. J. N. L., 284 Dinkins, Captain James 60,109 Dranesville, Federal Victory at in 1861, 69 Duke, Gen. Basil W., 160 Egerton Capt. W. B. 21 Ellsworth, G. A., Telegraph Operator, 118 Ewing D. D., Rev. Daniel B., 85 F Company, Richmond, Va., 59, 372 Farragut, How mosquitos prevented the captured of, 174 Federal Atrocities. 1861-5., 304 Five Forks, The 11th Va. at, 357 Folkes, Thomas M., 59 Forrest's Secret of Success Gen., 81, 83, 263 Frazier's Farm, Battle of, 366 Funkhouser, H. D., 308, 369 Gaines' Mill Battle of 93,193 General C. S. A., The Youngest, 55 Gettysburg, Battle of, 320 Gladden, killed, Gen A. H., 212 Gilmore Gen. Q. A., 6 Glenn. John F., 1 Goss, Lynn L., 312 Greasy Creek Battle of, 269 Graham's Battery, Capt. Edward, 12 Hammond, W. S..69 Hampton, Col. Frank T. 153 Hampton and Reconstruction Work, 183 Hanover Grays, Co. I, 15th Virg