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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 13 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Moreau Forrest or search for Moreau Forrest in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 24: Second attack on Vicksburg, etc. (search)
r takes command of the Mississippi squadron. guerilla warfare. General Grant's plans. the Army and Navy co-operate. expedition up the Yazoo. the Cairo sunk by torpedoes. difficulties surmounted by the Army. operations of Earl Van Dorn and Forrest. repulse of General Sherman near Chickasaw Bayou. attack on Haines' Bluff by the United States steamer Benton, etc., and death of Lieut.-Com. Gwinn. arrival of General McClernand to relieve Sherman. expedition to Arkansas post. last act of Grant moved towards Granada and everything looked well, but the Confederate general, Earl Van Dorn, dashed into Holly Springs twenty-eight miles in the rear of the Union Army, capturing the garrison and all their stores. At the same time General Forrest pushed his cavalry into West Tennessee, cutting the railroad to Columbus at several points between that place and Jackson. This completely cut Grant off from his only line of communication with the North and also from his several commands.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
ner G. W. Blunt. Acting--Master, J. R. Beers; Acting-Master's Mates, B. D. Reed, A. H. Comstock and G. W. Cleaves. Steamer rescue. Acting-Ensign, C. A. Blanchard; Acting-Master's Mate, E. D. Smith; Engineers: Acting-Third-Assistants, M. C. Heath and G. W. Howe. Tug O. M. Pettit. Acting-Ensign, T. E. Baldwin; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, Reuben McClenahan; Acting-Third-Assistant, Augustus Wandell. Iron-clad Keokuk. Lieutenant-Commander, A. C. Rhind; Lieutenant, Moreau Forrest; Acting-Master, James Taylor; Acting-Ensigns, W. H. Bullis, Ira T. Halstead and Alex McIntosh; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Geo. D. Slocum; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, John Read; First-Assistant Engineer, Wm. H. King; Second-Assistant Engineer, J. H. Hunt; Third-Assistant Engineers, J. M. Emanuel and H. A. Smith. Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. From Flag-officer Dupont, Commander Steedman, and Lieutenants-commanding C. R. P. Rod
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 36: operations of the South Atlantic Squadron under Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, 1863.--operations in Charleston harbor, etc. (search)
laimed that, if successful, the assault would enable him to pass the obstructions in the main channel with his fleet. He therefore directed that a storming party should be formed, and called for volunteers. No matter what may be the danger for officers and sailors to face, there is never any difficulty in getting volunteers in the American Navy, and such was the case on this ocasion. The following officers came forward and offered their services at once: Commander T. H. Stevens, Lieutenant Moreau Forrest, Lieutenant-Commander E. P. Williams. Lieutenant George C. Remey, Lieutenant S. W. Preston, Lieutenant F. J. Higginson, Ensign Charles H. Craven, Lieutenant-Commander F. M. Bunce, Lieutenant E. T. Brower, Ensign James Wallace and Ensign B. H. Porter; also the following officers of the Marine Corps: Captain C. G. McCawley, First-Lieutenant Charles H. Bradford, First-Lieutenant John C. Harris, Second-Lieutenant R. L. Meade, Second-Lieutenant Lyman P. Wallace and Second-Lieutenant L.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 43: operations of the Mississippi squadron, under Admiral Porter, after the Red River expedition. (search)
nd then re-embarked, and the vessels dropped down the river. The Petrel, Marmora, Exchange and Romeo were the gun-boats engaged. They were somewhat cut up, but drove the enemy away. The army lost eight killed and twenty-two wounded in this attack. This expedition had the effect which Sherman desired, viz., to draw the enemy toward Yazoo River. The gun-boats and army transports pushed on up the Yazoo as far as Greenwood, losing a few men by the way. At this place they fell in with General Forrest's command, when the army contingent landed and brought on a battle, or rather a skirmish, in which the Confederates were defeated. The result of this expedition was, as Sherman had anticipated, the falling back of all the enemy's troops which had been scattered along the Yazoo, Sunflower and Tallahatchie rivers, upon Grenada, to defend it from attack; and he was thus enabled to proceed on his raid to Meridian without molestation in his rear. On the 15th of February the Confederates
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
Assistant Surgeon, S. F. Shaw; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, F. F. Hastings; Acting-Master, Wm. M. Post; Acting-Ensigns, Wm. N. Price, S. H. Pollock and H. H. Johnson; Acting-Master's Mates, S. S. Willett, G. W. Eckert, C. C. Neil and R. W. Robins; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, A. B. Dunlap; Acting-Second-Assistant, A. B. Cullins; Acting-Third-Assistants, W. A. Smith, Rufus Burton and J. Hawkey; Gunner, J. M. Hogg. Iron-clad steamer Lehigh. Commander, Andrew Bryson; Lieutenant, Moreau Forrest; Assistant Surgeon, Wm. Longshaw, Jr.; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, F. C. lmlay; Acting-Master, Richard Burke; Acting-Ensigns, Edw. Tilghman, C. M. Thwing, J. E. Stickney and F. W. Towne; Acting-Master's Mate, G. W. Leland; Engineers: First Assistant, W. D. Pendleton; Second-Assistant, Alfred Hedrick; Third-Assistant, C. M. Van Tine, J. H. Thomas and S. C. McLanahan. Steamer Paul Jones. Commander, James M. Duncan; Lieutenant, James O'Kane; Assistant Surgeon, J. W. Coles; Acting Assi
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 55: operations of the Mississippi Squadron in the latter part of 1864 and in 1865. (search)
ederal Army and Navy had incurred to get the State under subjection, it had again been abandoned to the tender mercies of the Confederate rangers. General Thomas, with a comparatively small force, was left to occupy the whole State, so that when General Sherman defeated Hood, at Atlanta, the latter fell back upon Tennessee, and but for the generalship and foresight of that sturdy old Roman, George H. Thomas, a great disaster would have overtaken the Union cause. The Confederate General, Forrest, had invested Johnson ville, and Hood's entire army was reported as moving on that place, the scene of the late destruction of the gunboats and transports. It is not likely that Acting Rear-Admiral Lee had been apprised of the advance of Hood's army into Tennessee, as otherwise he would have sent some iron-clads to that quarter, since the tin-clads were entirely too light to contend against the heavy batteries opposed to them. Soon after these events, the Carondelet was sent to Lieutena