hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 34 results in 9 document sections:

our contused wounds from musket-balls. Gens. Palmer and Wessells, encouraged by their example their men to do their duty on the field. Gen. Wessells had a horse shot under him, and himself received a wound in the shoulder. Lieutenants West and Foster, my Aids-de-Camp, were active through the day, affording me much service and behaving gallantly. Capt. Davis, of the provostguard of my division, acted as my aid a portion of the time, rendering much assistance, and conducting himself in a gallathis, if it be not worthy of commendation, should not call forth censure, for censure undeserved chills the ardor and daring of the soldier, and dishonors both the living and the dead. Very respectfully, etc., Naglee, Brigadier-General. To Lieut. Foster, A. A.A. Gen., Casey's Division, Army of the Potomac. General Peck's report. Peck's headquarters, intrenched camp, near seven Pines, Va. Capt. F. A. Walker, Assist. Adjutant-General: On moving to the Seven Pines on the twenty-nint
that the brigade was under fire over twelve hours, and a portion of the time hotly engaged, I think the whole loss sustained, being in the aggregate two hundred and eight, will be considered small. More than thanks are greatly due to Captain J. Heron Foster of the One Hundred and Second Pennsylvania regiment, a member of my staff, for the gallantry and untiring energy with which he performed far more than his duties from early morning until late at night. He was the only staff-officer duri artillery becoming so hot, we were forced to retreat to a more sheltered position in the woods on the left. I cannot refrain from here expressing my admiration of the cool and daring conduct of your Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Captain J. Heron Foster, whose bearing under a terrible fire, and in a most exposed position, was brave in the extreme-nor can I close my report without thanking you for your noble example in exposing yourself as you did — showing the men under your command tha
cted the coward, deserting his company and running off. List of killed and wounded officers. Killed--Major Walterhouse, Lieut. Cowing. Wounded--Col. H. J. Korff, internally; Lieut.-Col. Stout, Adjt. Perry, Capt. Collins, company I; Lieutenant Foster, company I; Lieut. Martin, company C, severely; Lieut. J. S. Way, company C; Lieut. J. Holton, company K; Capt. Wingett, company G, badly; Lieut. Mount, company G. The rebels refusing to give any information in regard to the killed and wompany, mounted a horse and ingloriously ran. Let his name be remembered with infamy. Capt. Smith, company I, Sixteenth, raised his cap, the blood streaming down his face, and said: Adjutant, tell the Colonel I am wounded. The next moment Lieut. Foster, of the same company, said: O Jim! I'm wounded. The men were undisciplined, could not go through field movements, but they were not cowards. Vainly the officers endeavored to rally them. As well might they have attempted to stop a whi
cted the coward, deserting his company and running off. List of killed and wounded officers. Killed--Major Walterhouse, Lieut. Cowing. Wounded--Col. H. J. Korff, internally; Lieut.-Col. Stout, Adjt. Perry, Capt. Collins, company I; Lieutenant Foster, company I; Lieut. Martin, company C, severely; Lieut. J. S. Way, company C; Lieut. J. Holton, company K; Capt. Wingett, company G, badly; Lieut. Mount, company G. The rebels refusing to give any information in regard to the killed and wompany, mounted a horse and ingloriously ran. Let his name be remembered with infamy. Capt. Smith, company I, Sixteenth, raised his cap, the blood streaming down his face, and said: Adjutant, tell the Colonel I am wounded. The next moment Lieut. Foster, of the same company, said: O Jim! I'm wounded. The men were undisciplined, could not go through field movements, but they were not cowards. Vainly the officers endeavored to rally them. As well might they have attempted to stop a whi
wderboy — a contraband, named Stephen Jones — was killed, while bravely performing his duty, and Daniel Donovan, a seaman on the same boat, was wounded, and Mr. Coleman, the executive officer of the Ceres, had his pants torn by a rebel bullet while in the act of fixing a shell for the enemy, and a splinter sent into his throat from a ball which struck the deck near his head. Captain Woodward, Capt. Macdiarmid, and Capt. Flusser each had very narrow escapes. This victory is of great importance, inasmuch as it clears the way to Weldon. It is impossible to estimate the loss to the enemy, who, it is said, left some forty or fifty dead on the field. Since the departure of Gen. Burnside with a part of his army for Virginia, Acting Major-Gen. Foster, the wheel-horse of the Burnside expedition, is chief officer in command of this department. This is said to be a permanent arrangement, as it is understood that Gen. Burnside will be continued hereafter in a more active field of labo
l regiments under Col. Rains, comprising the Eleventh and Forty-second Tennessee, Thirtieth Alabama, and Twenty-first Georgia. Col. Cochran immediately formed his command on each side of the road, each flank supported by a piece of artillery from Foster's Wisconsin battery, under command of Lieut. John D. Anderson. The rebels advanced upon the Fourteenth Kentucky in extended line, and their flanking regiments thrown forward, with the evident intention of surrounding and cutting off the whole red charged by column of regiments, until when within two hundred and fifty yards, Col. Cochran, who had stood without discharging a gun, poured a terrible fire upon them, which checked their advance and threw them into disorder. In the mean time, Foster's entire battery of six guns had been placed in position on an eminence in the rear, and opened fire, which turned the rebel disorder into a rout, and no more was seen of them. Rebel officers who came in under a flag of truce, acknowledged a los
Lone Jack, at seven o'clock P. M. on the fifteenth instant. On the morning of the sixteenth the rebel forces attacked Major Foster with six hundred State militia at Lone Jack, defeating him, and captured two pieces of artillery. The loss on each side was about fifty killed and seventy-five to one hundred wounded. Among the latter was Major Foster. Foster's command made a gallant fight, and were only defeated by overwhelming force. On my arrival at Lone Jack I found General Warren with a coFoster's command made a gallant fight, and were only defeated by overwhelming force. On my arrival at Lone Jack I found General Warren with a command of eight hundred, consisting of the First Missouri and First Iowa cavalry and two pieces of artillery, threatened with an immediate attack by the whole rebel force, the rebel pickets being then in a part of his camp; but on hearing of my approahe fifteenth instant, about eight hundred men (our detachment included) were sent out from Lexington, under command of Major Foster. We arrived in the vicinity of Lone Jack at ten P. M. on the evening of the same day, where we learned that the enemy
this post. Colonel Dennis's command consisted of the Thirtieth Illinois, commanded by Major Warren Shedd; Twentieth Illinois, commanded by Capt. Frisbie; a section of two pieces of gunboat artillery, and two companies of cavalry commanded by Captain Foster. Colonel Dennis struck tents on the morning of August thirty-first, destroying such stores and baggage as he was unable to carry, and marched to within twelve miles of this post, when he was met by an order from me directing him to march for risbie, commanding the Twentieth Illinois, and to Major Shedd, commanding the Thirtieth Illinois; also to Adjutant Peyton, of the Thirtieth, who, severely wounded, refused to leave the field. Major Shedd was also wounded. Great praise is due Capt. Foster, commanding the cavalry, he rendering Col. Dennis important aid on every part of the field. The men acted with the most veteran courage. Surgeon Goodbrake, of the Twentieth Illinois, was untiring in his attention to the wounded, and for skil
e usefulness there have been doubts in some minds, conducted themselves with great propriety, while one of their officers, Lieut. C. E. Lyon, formerly a sergeant in the Massachusetts Twenty-fourth, is highly complimented in the official despatches of Col. Potter, the commandant of the post. One little incident of the fight is worthy of mention. On approaching our hospital the rebels showed fight, but, on being told what the building was, said they would respect it. The nurses, however, were to consider themselves as prisoners, and a guard was placed over them. But when the tide of battle turned, and the rebels were driven back, the nurses rose upon, and captured, and retained their guard! Immediately on the receipt of the intelligence here, Gen. Foster started for Washington to take such measures as the exigencies of the case demand. We shall be disappointed if a week goes by and the rebels are not more severely chastised than they were yesterday morning.--(See Supplement.)