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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Foster or search for Foster in all documents.

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lphia, of Company F, Seventy-first regiment. Dr. Peugnet requested me to assist him, and he having completed his operation, then amputated the arm at the shoulder-joint of a sergeant of a Maine or a New Hampshire regiment, who had a brother about 17 years of age, who had remained behind to take care of him. This man died under the operation. The next operation was that of my friend Wm. Smith, of Brooklyn, whom I had conveyed to the hospital. His foot was amputated. During this time Drs. Foster, Swift, and Winston, of the Eighth New York; Dr. De Grant, Dr. Griswold, Dr. Buxton, and the doctor of the Fourth Maine; Dr. Stewart, of Minnesota; Harris, of Rhode Island, and four others whose names I did not learn, one of whom, I believe, was the surgeon of the West Point battery, were attending to the wounded of their respective regiments. Private Tyler, of the West Point battery, had his thigh amputated and died that night. Cornelius, Col. Martin's servant, who was wounded while assis
ns loaded with provisions, &c., and about seven hundred prisoners. Among the latter were Gen. Burnside, of the Rhode Island brigade, Col. Corcoran, of the New York Irish 69th regiment, Hon. Mr. Ely, member of Congress from New York, Mr. Carrington, These are errors. Gen. Burnside and Mr. Carrington were not captured.--Ed. R. R. of this State, a nephew of the late William C. Preston, who had gone over to the enemy, and thirty-two captains, lieutenants, &c. We came near bagging the Hon. Mr. Foster, Senator from Connecticut. The official reports of the casualties of the day have not yet come in, and consequently it is impossible to say what our loss is. I can only venture an opinion, and that is, that we lost in killed, wounded, and missing, about 1,500--of which about four hundred were killed. The enemy's loss was terrible, being at the lowest calculation 3,000. Thus far I have said but little of the part taken by particular officers and regiments; for the reason that I desir
Col. Austin and Capt. Engart. Brig.-Gen. Clark was also wounded. His infantry (200 men) lost, in killed, 17, and wounded, 71. Col. Burbridge was severely wounded. Capts. Farris and Halleck, and Lieut. Haskins, were killed. Gen. Clark's cavalry, together with the Windsor Guards, were under the command of Lieut.-Col. Major, who did good service. They lost 6 killed and 5 wounded. Brig.-Gen. McBride's division (605 men) lost 22 killed, 67 severely wounded, and 57 slightly wounded. Col. Foster and Capts. Nichols, Dougherty, Armstrong, and Mings were wounded while gallantly leading their respective commands. Gen. Parson's brigade, 256 infantry and artillery, under command respectively of Col. Kelly and Capt. Guibor, and 406 cavalry, Col. Brown, lost — the artillery three killed and seven wounded, the infantry nine killed and thirty-eight wounded, the cavalry three killed and two wounded. Col. Kelly was wounded in the hand. Capt. Coleman was mortally wounded, and has since di
Col. Austin and Capt. Engart. Brig.-Gen. Clark was also wounded. His infantry (200 men) lost, in killed, 17, and wounded, 71. Col. Burbridge was severely wounded. Capts. Farris and Halleck, and Lieut. Haskins, were killed. Gen. Clark's cavalry, together with the Windsor Guards, were under the command of Lieut.-Col. Major, who did good service. They lost 6 killed and 5 wounded. Brig.-Gen. McBride's division (605 men) lost 22 killed, 67 severely wounded, and 57 slightly wounded. Col. Foster and Capts. Nichols, Dougherty, Armstrong, and Mings were wounded while gallantly leading their respective commands. Gen. Parson's brigade, 256 infantry and artillery, under command respectively of Col. Kelly and Capt. Guibor, and 406 cavalry, Col. Brown, lost — the artillery three killed and seven wounded, the infantry nine killed and thirty-eight wounded, the cavalry three killed and two wounded. Col. Kelly was wounded in the hand. Capt. Coleman was mortally wounded, and has since di