Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Henry D. Foster or search for Henry D. Foster in all documents.

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alteration is proposed to be made. On the 19th of April, Congress took up this plan for consideration and action, and Mr. Spaight of N. C. moved that the fifth proposition above quoted, prohibiting Slavery after the year 1800, be stricken out of the Ordinance; and Mr. Read of S. C. seconded the motion. The question was put in this form: Shall the words moved to be stricken out stand? and on this question the Ays and Noes were required and taken, with the following result: N. Hamp Mr. Foster ay, Ay.   Mr. Blanchard ay, Massachu Mr. Gerry ay, Ay.   Mr. Partridge ay, R. Island Mr. Ellery ay, Ay.   Mr. Howell ay, Connect Mr. Sherman ay, Ay.   Mr. Wadsworth ay, New York Mr. De Witt ay, Ay.   Mr. Paine ay, N. Jersey Mr. Dick ay, No vote. By the Articles of Confederation, two or more delegates were required to be present to cast the vote of a State. New Jersey, therefore, failed to vote. Pennsyl Mr. Mifflin ay, Ay.   Mr. Montgomery ay,   Mr
off — since known as Republicans. The joint resolve, as thus amended, passed the House by Yeas 120 to Nays 98--the division being substantially as before. In the Senate, this resolve was taken up for action, February 24th; and, on the 27th, Mr. Foster (Whig), of Tennessee, proposed the following: And provided further, That, in fixing the terms and conditions of such admission, it shall be expressly stipulated and declared; that the State of Texas, and such other States as may be formed onson, Lewis, McDuffie, Merrick, Niles, Semple. Sevier, Sturgeon, Tappan, Walker, Woodbury--27. The Nays--against the proposed Annexation — were : Messrs. Archer, Barrow, Bates, Bayard, Berrien, Choate, Clayton, Crittenden, Dayton, Evans, Foster, Francis, huntington, Jarnagin, Mangum, Miller, Morehead, Pearce, Phelps, Porter, Rives, Simmons, Upham, White, Woodbridge--25. Yeas: From Free States, 13; Slave States, 14. Nays: From Free States, 12; Slave States, 13. and the proposition
lee--36. Nays--Messrs. Bingham, Chandler, Clark, Collamer, Dixon, Doolittle, Fessenden, lost, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Hamlin, Harlan, King, Simmons, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Wade, and Wilson--19. 2. Reale, of New Hampshire, Sumner and Wilson, of Massachulsetts, Simmons, of Rhode Island, Dixon and Foster, of Connecticut, Collamer and Foot, of Vermont, King, of New York, Ten Eyck, of New Jersey, Pughof Slavery. This was rejected — Yeas 12; Nays 31--only Messrs. Clark, Clingman, Dixon, Foot, Foster, Hale, Hamlin, Latham, Pugh, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, and Wilson, voting in the affirmative. The oas on the first resolve, less Brown, Mallory, and Pugh; Nays 12--Bingham, Chandler, Dixon, Foot, Foster, Hale, Pugh, Simmons, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, and Wilson. 0 7. Resolved, That the provisionbly for Lincoln — the former choosing Andrew G. Curtin her Governor by 32,164 majority over Henry D. Foster, who had the hearty support of all three opposing parties; while Indiana chose Gen. Henry S
tructive; that, in the opinion of the Senate of the United States, no such reconstruction is practicable; and, therefore, to the maintenance of the existing Union and Constitution should be directed all the energies of all the departments of the Government, and the efforts of all good citizens. The vote was now taken on this substitute, which was adopted, as follows: Yeas.--Messrs. Anthony, Baker, Bingham, Cameron, Chandler, Clark, Collamer, Dixon, Doolittle, Durkee, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Harlan, King, Seward, Simmons, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, and Wilson-25 [all Republicans]. Nays.--Messrs. Bayard, Bigler, Bragg, Bright, Clingman, Crittenden, Fitch, Green, Gwin, Hunter, Johnson, of Tennessee, Kennedy, Lane, of Oregon, Mason, Nicholson, Pearce, Polk, Powell, Pugh, Rice, Saulsbury, and Sebastian-23 [all Democrats, but two Bell-Conservatives, in italics]. Messrs. Iverson, of Georgia, Benjamin and Slidell, of Louisiana, Hemphill and Wigfa
erfere, within any State, with the domestic institutions thereof, etc. This proposed amendment was finally concurred in by the Senate: Yeas 24; Nays 12: as follows: Yeas--Messrs. Anthony, Baker, Bigler, Bright, Crittenden, Dixon, Douglas, Foster, Grimes, Gwin, Harlan, Hunter, Johnson, of Tennessee, Kennedy, Latham, Mason, Morrill, Nicholson, Polk, Pugh, Rice, Sebastian, Ten Eyck, and Thomson-24. Nays--Messrs. Bingham, Chandler, Clark, Doolittle, Durkee, Foot, King, Sumner, Trumbull, Won; which the Senate refused, by the following vote: Yeas--Messrs. Crittenden, Douglas, Harlan, Johnson, of Tennessee, Kennedy, Morrill, and Thomson-7. Nays--Messrs. Bayard, Bigler, Bingham, Bright, Chandler, Clark, Dixon, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Gwin, Hunter, Lane, Latham, Mason, Nicholson, Polk, Pugh, Rice, Sebastian, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wigfall, Wilkinson, and Wilson--28. So the Senate, by four to one, disposed of the scheme of the Peace Commissioners, and pr
Republicans) to Nays--Messrs. Breckinridge, Bright, Browning, Carlile, Doolittle, Fessenden, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Harris, Howe, Johnson, of Tenn., Johnson, of Mo., Kennedy, Latham, McDougall, Morthony, Bingham, Browning, Carlile, Chandler, Clark, Collamer, Cowan, Doolittle, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Harlan, Harris, Howe, Johnson, of Tenn., King, Lane, of Ind., Lane, of Kansas, Mc Yeas--Messrs. Anthony, Browning, Chandler, Clark, Cowan, Dixon, Doolittle, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Harlan, Harris, Howe, Johnson, of Tenn., Kennedy, King, Lane, of Ind., Lane, of Kansas, Yeas--Messrs. Anthony, Bingham, Browning, Clark, Collamer, Dixon, Doolittle, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Harris, King, Lane, of Ind., Lane, of Kansas, McDougall, Sherman, Simmons, Sumner. Baker, Browning, Carlile, Chandler, Clark, Collamer, Cowan, Dixon, Doolittle, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Harris, Howe, King, Lane, of Ind., Lane, of Kansas, McDougall, Morrill, Rice, Sherman,
he contest; enthusiasm of the defenders, 445; report of an eye-witness, 446-7; Wigfall visits the fort, 448; the surrender, 448-9; great excitement at the North, 453; the President's Message, 556. Fort Walker, bombarded, 604; captured, 605. Foster, Ephraim H., on annexation, 172. Foster, Henry D., of Pa., beaten, by Curtin, 326. Fouke, Col. Philip B., anecdote of, 597. France, acquisition of Louisiana by, 54; cession of, to the United States, 56; is propitiated to favor our AnnexaFoster, Henry D., of Pa., beaten, by Curtin, 326. Fouke, Col. Philip B., anecdote of, 597. France, acquisition of Louisiana by, 54; cession of, to the United States, 56; is propitiated to favor our Annexation schemes, 169 to 171; the policy of Washington toward, 265; extract from the treaty with, 265-266; proposes to guarantee Cuba to Spain, 270; 499. Frankfort, Ky., Secessionists to meet there, 493. Franklin, Benjamin, 35; 42; 107; 255; 385-6. Franklin, Jesse, of N. C., Chairman of Committee on Indiana Territory memorials for Slavery, 53. Franklin, T. E., in Peace Conference, 401. Frederick, Md., a constable at, makes an offer to the sheriff of Montreal, 218; the Legislature conv