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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 48 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Stephen Symonds Foster or search for Stephen Symonds Foster in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
ce them as a Christian church and clergy. To this substitute rallied Parker Pillsbury, Stephen S. Foster, and N. P. Rogers, while Mr. Garrison and Charles C. Burleigh contended for the original fe Massachusetts Society held at Millbury on August 17, 1841, Mr. Foster moved the following: S. S. Foster. Resolved, That we recommend to abolitionists as the most Lib. 11.139. consistent and effelley, writing to G. W. Benson, censures Charles Burleigh for not Ms. Sept. 13, 1841. wanting S. S. Foster sent to lecture in Connecticut, where the new-organized State Society was carrying on an actither times, need Foster's preaching. See Cyrus Peirce's protests against Abby Kelley's and S. S. Foster's resolutions at Fall River, Nov. 23, 1841, and against their style generally (Lib. 12: 3, 19illbury quarterly meeting of the Mass. A. S. Society, in August, Mellen, in conjunction with S. S. Foster, attempted to embody this argument in a resolution, they were defeated (Lib. 11.139). It will
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
ervice, at least for some time to come. This morning (Sunday), G. W. Pryor, S. S. Foster, Abby Kelley, and Mrs. Russell left for Vernon, on their way to Utica, in a e priesthood, the Sabbath, etc., which created no small stir. The next day, S. S. Foster arrived, He was out on bail from Leverett-Street jail, Boston, having beewith a violence hardly to be denominated Christian (Lib. 12: 110, 118). Stephen Symonds Foster was born at Canterbury, N. H., in 1809, and graduated at Dartmouth Collothing specially offensive, was listened to without disturbance. Our friend S. S. Foster then took the platform, and was allowed to proceed without much interruption Nov. 29. and will continue in session at least three days. As bro. Foster S. S. Foster. will be there, I presume we shall have a repetition of the scenes in Syraco disturbance until the evening of the third day, and then it burst not upon S. S. Foster but upon J. Cannings Fuller and Abby Kelley. The Mayor of Utica, Horatio Se
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
Ms. You may not be aware of the fact that we are trying to upturn some of the hard soil of New Hampshire. Douglass, Pillsbury, F. Douglass, P. Pillsbury, S. S. Foster, John M. Spear, C. L. Remond, W. A. White. Foster, Spear, Jane E. Hitchcock of Oneida, N. Y., and myself are in the field, and Remond and, perhaps, White will Liberator to the difference between the Society and its printer, who, he Lib. 14.179. said, was bound to refute the facts which the Board of Managers, through S. S. Foster, had presented without as yet eliciting any denial. Rogers, already wounded by the Ms. Oct. 30, 1844, Rogers to F. Jackson. strictures on his no-organizationendell, and I don't know by whom else of those once my lovers. They know nothing about the merits of the case, which was merely this. Foster got a notion the S. S. Foster. publisher of the paper, John R. French, was receiving too many donations, and himself too few—which [last was] true enough, though he was so rudely radical an
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
r To whom we sacrifice each year The best blood of our Athens here— (Dear M., pray brush up your Lempriere.) A terrible denouncer he, Old Sinai burns unquenchably Upon his lips; he well might be a Hot-blazing soul from fierce Judaea, Habakkuk, Ezra, or Hosea. His words burn as with iron searers, And nightmare-like he mounts his hearers, Spurring them like avenging Fate, or As Waterton his alligator. Chas. Waterton. Hard by, as calm as summer even, Smiles the reviled and pelted Stephen, S. S. Foster. The unappeasable Boanerges To all the Churches and the Clergies, The grim savant who, to complete His own peculiar cabinet, Contrived to label with his kicks One from the followers of Hicks; Elias Hicks. Who studied mineralogy Not with soft book upon the knee, But learned the properties of stones By contact sharp of flesh and bones, And made the experimentum crucis With his own body's vital juices: A man with caoutchouc endurance, A perfect gem for life insurance, A kind of maddened
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
o Douglass, three for Foster, and three for myself. Everything S. S. Foster. passed off in the most spirited and agreeable manner. On Fri Gen. Agent W. A. S. S. a distance of forty miles. J. W. Walker, S. S. Foster, and Dr. Peck helped to fill up the gap at the meetings. To-dayThis threw the labor mainly upon me, though our sterling friends S. S. Foster and J. W. Walker made long and able speeches, which aided me con gratified on Thursday last. In company with Douglass, Foster, S. S. Foster, J. W. Walker. Walker, and the indefatigable General Agent of thElizabeth Jones of Salem have been to see me; so has a sister of S. S. Foster, who is residing here. George Bradburn is a daily visitor at myo to-day with benefit. I am now only waiting for the arrival of S. S. Foster, who expects to be here on Thursday, when, if the weather be faiompany me as far as Albany, and from thence go to Philadelphia. S. S. Foster will go with me as far as Worcester; and Samuel Brooke will go w
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 10: the Rynders Mob.—1850. (search)
or that the Chief of Police received his instructions to pay no Lib. 20:[79]. attention to anything short of actual assault and battery. Hence his captains and their hundreds looked on Nat. A. S. Standard, 10.202. passively at the scenes in the hall of the Society Library in the evening of May 7, when some two dozen rioters drowned with jocose and abusive interlocutions, with Lib. 20:[78]. hisses, oaths, catcalls, and a general charivari, the attempted speeches of Parker Pillsbury, Stephen S. Foster, and Mrs. Ernestine L. Rose. Wednesday's sessions opened in the morning at the May 8, 1850. same place. According to the Tribune's report of the 348 Broadway. proceedings— Mr. Garrison wished to say, once for all, that though this was a meeting of the Anti-Slavery Society, yet the doors were wide open to those who dissented; they were invited here in good faith, and should have, if they desired it, a full and fair hearing. They who are unwilling to accept an offer so generou
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 19: John Brown.—1859. (search)
arters. No doubt the pseudo-religionists and heartless conservatives of our times are much disturbed and chagrined in view of their appropriation. Forty thousand dollars to be expended for the promotion of the most radical and unpopular reforms! Did the world ever hear of such a thing before! Is it not enough to throw all hunkerdom into convulsions? And then, six thousand dollars distributed among such fanatical, infidel, disorganizing persons as Henry C. Wright, Parker Pillsbury, Stephen S. Foster, and William Lloyd Garrison, and their families! Verily, this is to cause endurance to pass its bounds! It is quite insufferable! I am more and more struck with the moral courage and deliberate purpose manifested by our departed friend Hovey, in these bequests. He had a host of friends, and many in the antislavery ranks to whom he was strongly attached, and whom he held in the highest esteem; but no other half-dozen in the land were so proscribed and denounced by the scribes and