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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: dialect writers (search)
r own race into literature or to realize the value of their own folk-lore. The possibilities of negro folk-lore, says a recent negro writer, See Benjamin Griffith Brawley's The negro in literature and art (Atlanta, 1910), p. 5. have carried it across the line, so that it has had strong influence on the work of such Southern writers as Thomas Nelson Page and Frank L. Stanton, and on that of George W. Cable. Its chief monument so far has been in the Uncle Remus tales of Brer Rabbit and Brer Fox told by Joel Chandler Harris. The chief writers who preceded Harris in the attempt to portray negro character were William Gilmore Simms, See also Book II, Chap. VII. Edgar Allan Poe, See also Book II, Chap. XIV. Harriet Beecher Stowe, See also Book III, Chap. XI. Stephen Collins Foster, and Irwin Russell. Hector, the negro slave in Simms's Yemassee (1835), and Jupiter in Poe's Gold-Bug (1843) are alike in many respects. Both belong to the type of faithful body servant,