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cept on one side, where a beautiful lawn spreads its verdure. Every thing speaks to us. The castle itself is of immemorial antiquity,--supposed to have been built in the earliest days of the French monarchy, as far back as Louis le Gros. It had been tenanted by princes of Lorraine, and been battered by the cannon of Turenne, one of whose balls penetrated its thick masonry. The ivy, so luxuriantly mantling the gate with the tower by its side, was planted by the eminent British statesman Charles Fox, on a visit during the brief peace of Amiens. The park owed much of its beauty to Lafayette himself. The situation harmonized with the retired habits which found shelter there from the storms of fortune. During his long absence from the Senate and the country, the impending crisis to which he had so distinctly and so often pointed was steadily approaching. Under the timid and imbecile administration of James Buchanan (inaugurated March 4, 1857), the South continued to make desperate
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 2: Germs of contention among brethren.—1836. (search)
arge proportion of the abolitionists were religious persons . . . . I have thought of you as another Wilberforce—but would Wilberforce have spoken thus of the day on which the Son of God rose from the dead?. . . I have supposed, that, in your great and incessant exertions in the anti-slavery cause, you were influenced by no worldly nor political motive — that yours was a holy zeal and a Christian benevolence, etc., etc. Here is Christian charity for you! Because, with Calvin, Belsham, Paley, Fox, Whitby, Barclay, Gill, Selden, Luther, and many other distinguished commentators and pious men, I maintain that, under the gospel dispensation, there is no such thing as a holy day, but that all our time ought to be sanctified by works of righteousness and in well-doing,—it follows, according to the insinuations of Mr. Fair, that I am not a pious person—that abolitionists are not religious—that I am influenced by worldly or political motives—that mine is not a holy zeal and a Christian
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
et the shout of emancipated millions rise, before his ear is dust whose voice first waked the trumpet-note which is rocking the nation from side to side. To him (need I name him?) with at least equal truth may be applied the language of Burke to Fox: It will be a distinction honorable to the age, Speech on Mr. Fox's East India Bill, Dec. 1, 1783. that the rescue of the greatest number of the human race from the greatest tyranny that was ever exercised, has fallen to the lot of one with abiliMr. Fox's East India Bill, Dec. 1, 1783. that the rescue of the greatest number of the human race from the greatest tyranny that was ever exercised, has fallen to the lot of one with abilities and dispositions equal to the task;— that it has fallen to the lot of one who has the enlargement to comprehend, the spirit to undertake, and the eloquence to support so great a measure of hazardous benevolence. At the anniversary meeting of the American Anti-Slavery Society, Mr. Garrison was put upon a committee with Whittier and Stanton and the Rev. Orange Scott, to consider a resolution of Whittier's on political action. He reported for himself and colleagues a resolution, Lib. 7.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 7: the World's Convention.—1840. (search)
y sorry to be so understood. We are not, nor ever have been, connected with the antislavery societies, and, although among those associated with them are many estimable individuals, and not a few of them in the list of our particular friends, yet we have uniformly believed, that one of the greatest mistakes committed by the antislavery people is the mixing up with the abolition question the warfare against what they are pleased to call prejudices in regard to the colored race. Spirits of Fox, Woolman and Benezet! Here we have the full manifestation of that hateful spirit which hunts the colored man with blood-hound ferocity on these shores, and makes his life full of wretchedness and misery. Such Quakerism as this is of Satan's own manufacture. I shall wait with some curiosity to see how it will be treated by the Society of Friends in England. I hope you will lay it before them, that we may have a response in due season. William Bassett has been cut off from the Society in
, Mass., Sept. 8, 1881], 2.327. Fowler, Lorenzo Niles [b. Cohocton, N. Y., about 1811], 2.118. Fowler, Orson S. [b. Cohocton, N. Y., Oct. 11, 1809], 2.119. Fox, Charles James [1749-1806], 1.379, 465, tribute from Burke, 2.130.-See, also, the Postscript after the Preface to Vol. I. Fox, George, anti-slavery, 2.110, 423. Fox, George, anti-slavery, 2.110, 423. Francis, F. Todd's vessel, 1.165, carries slaves to New Orleans, 166, 169, 186, 197. Francisco slave case, 1.282. Franklin, Benjamin, Pres. Penn. A. S. Soc., 1.89, 425; proverb on removals, 2.51. Franklin Co., Mass., clerical A. S. convention, : 243. Free Church (Boston), organization and building, 1.481; turned out of9.—Portrait in Life. Horsenail, William, 1.353. Horton, Jacob, 1.124. Houston, Sam. [1793-1863], filibuster leader, 2.81; defeats Santa Anna, 79. Hovey, Charles Fox [b. Brookfield, Mass., Feb. 28, 1807; d. Boston, April 28, 1859], 1.495. Hovey, Sylvester, 1.474. Howard,——Mr. (of Brooklyn, Conn.), 2.44. Howe, Samuel G<
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 16: Webster (search)
rusted to their speeches in Parliament or Congress or before the people, almost as in the days of Fox and Pitt, to make their arguments and opinions known, and they would have thought any other cours literature lies, if we pause to reflect upon it, in the very nature of the speech itself. Charles Fox was the author of the famous aphorism that no good speech ever read well. This is a declaratine there can hardly be a doubt. But the theory, however valid, is not without its dangers. Charles Fox lived up to his own principle. He was, it may well be thought, the greatest of English orato for the genuine eloquence of the spoken word. Macaulay is an example of this latter class, as Fox is of the former. Macaulay's speeches are essays, eloquent and rhetorical, but still essays—lite Burke undoubtedly comes nearest to a complete union of the two qualities, and while the words of Fox and Pitt are unread and unquoted, except by historians, Burke's gorgeous sentences are recited an
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: poets of the Civil War II (search)
d enchanted ground, But not a Knight asleep. One phase of the struggle ends with Lee's whole army crossing the Potomac into Maryland—an event celebrated by Hayne in his Beyond the Potomac. Then the fighting changed to the West, and we have Thompson's poem on Joseph E. Johnston in which he exhorts the West to emulate Virginia in its struggle for freedom. Requier's Clouds in the West is followed by Flash's tribute to Zollicoffer, Ticknor's poem on Albert Sidney Johnston, Hayne's The Swamp Fox—a spirited characterization of Morgan, who seems to the poet a reincarnation of the South Carolina Revolutionary patriot Marion. Connected also with the battles of the West were Ticknor's Loyal and Little Giffen of Tennessee—the latter based on a story of real life and a striking illustration of the heroism with which the sons of the masses threw themselves into the Southern struggle. This poem, so dramatic in its quality, so concise in its expression, so vital in its phrasing, is destined <
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestral (search)
could claim as near relationship to him as could any of her generation. She was extremely proud of this kinship, and no one who knew her could doubt that from the Marions she inherited many vital qualities. One winter, toward the end of her life, there was a meeting at the Old South Church at which — as at the gathering described at the beginning of this chapter — there was talk of ancestry and kindred topics. The weather was stormy, our mother well on in the eighties, but she was there. Being called on to speak, she made a brief address in the course of which she alluded to her Southern descent, and to General Francis Marion, her great-great-uncle. As she spoke her eyes lightened with mirth, in the way we all remember: General Marion, she said, was known in his generation as the Swamp Fox ; and when I succeed in eluding the care of my guardians, children and grandchildren, and coming to a meeting like this, I think I may be said to have inherited some of his characteristic
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 14: the sundown splendid and serene 1906-1907; aet. 87-88 (search)
My last day in my dear son's house. He and Fannie have been devotedly kind to me. They made me occupy their room, much to my bodily comfort, but to the great disquiet of my mind, as I hated much to inconvenience them. My son has now a very eminent position.... God bless the house and all in it. December 17. The Old South Chapter of D. A.R.'s, met in the real Old South Church; there was much good speaking. I recited my Battle Hymn and boasted my descent from General Marion, the Swamp Fox, saying also, When, eluding the vigilance of children and grandchildren, I come to such a meeting as this, without a previous promise not to open my lips, I think that I show some of the dexterity of my illustrious relative. I also had to spring up and tell them that my grandmother, niece to General Marion, gave her flannel petticoat to make cartridges for the soldiers of the Revolution. The path of the guardian (or jailer, as she sometimes put it) was not always plain. The wayfaring wo
, Mr., II, 62. Five of Clubs, I, 74, 110, 128; II, 74. Flibbertigibbet, II, 144, 145, 367. Florence, I, 175. Florida, II, 268. Flower, Constance, II, 168. Flynt, Baker, II, 230. Foley, Margaret, I, 227, 237. Forbes, John, II, 279. Forbes, John M., II, 109, 177. Foresti, Felice, I, 94, 104. Fort Independence, I, 346. Forum, II, 182. Foster, L. S., I, 248. Foulke, Dudley, I, 365; II, 188. Foundling Hospital, II, 8. Fowler, O. S., I, 98, 99. Fox, Charles, II, 265. France, I, 131, 300, 308, 310; II, 9, 20, 26, 34. Francis, Eliza C., I, 18, 25, 26, 27, 31, 42, 103, 150, 230; II, 319. Francis, J. W., I, 18, 19, 26, 27, 36, 42, 57, 114, 150; II, 251. Francis, V. M., II, 362. Franco-Prussian War, I, 300; I, 13, 20. Franklin, Benjamin, I, 6. Fredericksburg, I, 192. Free Religious Club, see Radical Club. Freeman, Edward, I, 95, 134. Freeman, Mrs., Edward, I, 95, 134. Fremdenblatt, II, 19. French Revolution, I,
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