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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 28 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 27 3 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 27 7 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 19 1 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 1 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Organization of the two governments. (search)
mes B. Fry. General officers of the United States army, January 1, 1861 Brevet Lieut.-Gen. Winfield Scott (General-in-chief) Brig.-General John E. Wool Brig.-General David E. Twiggs Brig.-General William S. Harney. (Note.-E. V. Sumner was promoted Brigadier-General March 16, 1861, vice David E. Twiggs, dismissed March 1, 1861.) * Afterward in the Confederate service. The United States Navy Department. Secretary of the Navy: Gideon Welles. Assistant Secretary: Gustavus V. Fox. Yards and Docks: Rear-Admiral Joseph Smith. Ordnance and Hydrography Captain George A. Magruder (dismissed April 22, 1861) Captain Andrew A. Harwood (relieved July 22, 1862) Rear-Admiral John A. Dahlgren (relieved June 24, 1863) Commander Henry A. Wise. (By act of Congress of July 5, 1862, Hydrography was transferred to the Bureau of Navigation.) Navigation (established by act of July 5, 1862) Rear-Admiral Charles A. Davis. Equipment and recruiting (establi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first step in the War. (search)
ns), and the Harriet Lane (1 8-inch gun and 4 32-pounders). The Pocahontas did not arrive till the afternoon of the 13th. The expedition was in charge of Captain Gustavus V. Fox (afterward Assistant Secretary of the Navy), who had visited the fort on the 21st of March. It had been understood between Secretary Welles and Captain FCaptain Fox that the movement should be supported by the Powhatan (1 11-inch and 10 9-inch guns); but, unknown to Mr. Welles, and perhaps without full understanding of this plan, President Lincoln had consented to the dispatch of the ship to the relief of Fort Pickens, for which destination it had sailed from New York, April 6th, under command of Lieutenant David D. Porter. This conflict of plans deprived Captain Fox of the ship which he calls the fighting portion of his fleet; and to this circumstance he attributed the failure of the expedition. editors. Secession Hall, Charleston, scene of the passage of the ordinance of secession. From a photograph. Ab
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., In command in Missouri. (search)
he preservation of the capital was deemed of more importance than the State of Missouri; that their entire time and attention was devoted to meeting requisitions made upon them; that General Fremont had full power, and that he, as Fremont's chief quartermaster, must use his own judgment and do the best he could toward meeting the wants of the department. In July, at Washington, the subject of mortar-boats for the Mississippi expedition had been discussed between General M. C. Meigs, Gustavus V. Fox, afterward the Assistant Secretary of the Navy, and myself, and had been referred to me for decision, as having in charge military operations on the Mississippi. On the 31st of July the Secretary of War directed that the 16 nine-inch guns made at Pittsburg for the navy should be forwarded to me with the greatest dispatch, and that 30 thirteen-inch mortars be made as soon as possible and forwarded to me, together with shells for both guns and mortars. On the 24th of August I directed
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Recollections of Foote and the gun-boats. (search)
l 17th, in which he said: Be not surprised if you are called here suddenly by telegram. If called, come instantly. In a certain contingency it will be necessary to have the aid of the most thorough knowledge of our Western rivers and the use of steam on them, and in that event I have advised that you should be consulted. The call by telegraph followed close upon the letter. I hurried to Washington, where I was introduced to the Secretary of the Navy, the Hon. Gideon Welles, and to Captain G. V. Fox, afterward Assistant Secretary. In the August following I was to construct 7 gun-boats, which, according to the contract, were to draw 6 feet of water, carry 13 heavy guns each, be plated with 2 1/2-inch iron, and have a speed of 9 miles an hour. The De Kalb (at first called the St. Louis) was the type of the other six, named the Carondelet, Cincinnati, Louisville, Mound City, Cairo, and Pittsburgh. They were 175 feet long, 51 1/2 feet beam; the flat sides sloped at an angle of abou
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Union and Confederate navies. (search)
, officers, and men actually employed in naval operations. To meet this difficulty, the Secretary wisely called Captain Gustavus V. Fox to the post of chief professional adviser. Captain Fox had formerly been an officer of the navy, and had borne Captain Fox had formerly been an officer of the navy, and had borne a high reputation for professional skill. His connection with manufacturing enterprises during the few years preceding the war had emancipated him from the slavery of routine and had given him a knowledge of affairs which naval officers in general r him on May 9th, 1861, as chief clerk. When Congress met in July, it created the office of Assistant Secretary, to which Fox was appointed on August 1st, and which he retained until after the close of the war. He was succeeded in the chief clerksh have been expected, was seriously defective. In January, Lovell was apprehensive that fourteen Mississippi River Gustavus V. Fox, Assistant Secretary, United States Navy. From a photograph. captains and pilots will never agree about anything af
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 14.55 (search)
rcourse all the bays, sounds, rivers, and inlets of which we have given little more than the names. A superior naval force must command the whole of this division of the coast. On July 25th, Captain Du Pont wrote: They have our memoirs, and, Mr. Fox tells me, are at them. We are to see the Secretary, Mr. Welles, to-night, at our request, to talk over cur labors. . . . [July 26th.] Last night our conference had a meeting with the Secretary of the Navy and Mr. Fox, when the subject of the eMr. Fox, when the subject of the expeditions Brevet Major-General Thomas W. Sherman. From a photographe. was entered into. The Cabinet had our papers again. [July 28th.] I sat up last night in the Navy Department until eleven, with Charles Davis, to prepare for this meeting, by condensing into notes the pith of our reports, and to read them to the board when called upon; but General Meigs seemed to desire that our full reports should be read, which I could not, of course, ask to be done, without seeming to attach too much i
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., In the monitor turret. (search)
as twenty-two years of age, and previous to joining the Monitor had seen less than three years of active service, with the rank of midshipman.-S. D. G. I have suggested to Captain Marston to send on board the Monitor, as temporary commanding, Lieutenant Selfridge, until the arrival of Commodore Goldsborough, which will be in a few days. I appreciate your position, and you must appreciate mine, and serve with the same zeal and fidelity. With the kindest wishes for you all, most truly, G. V. Fox. For the next two months we lay at Hampton Roads. Twice the Merrimac came out of the Elizabeth River, but did not attack. We, on our side, had received positive orders not to attack in the comparatively shoal waters above Hampton Roads, where the Union fleet could not maneuver. The Merrimac protected the James River, and the Monitor protected the Chesapeake. Neither side had an iron-clad in reserve, and neither wished to bring on an engagement which might disable its only armored ves
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 15.63 (search)
to meet her. 2. The well-matured plan of erecting a citadel of considerable dimensions on the ample deck of the razed Merrimac admitted of a battery of heavy ordnance so formidable that no vessel of the ordinary type, of small dimensions, could withstand its fire. 3. The battery designed by the naval authorities of the Confederate States, in addition to the advantage of ample room and numerous guns, presented a The origin of the name Monitor is given in the following letter to Gustavus V. Fox, Assistant Secretary of the Navy: New York, January 20th, 1862. Sir: In accordance with your request, I now submit for your approbation a name for the floating battery at Green Point. The impregnable and aggressive character of this structure will admonish the leaders of the Southern Rebellion that the batteries on the banks of their rivers will no longer present barriers to the entrance of the Union forces. The iron-clad intruder will thus prove a severe monitor to those leade
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 15.65 (search)
John A. Griswold of [Troy] N. Y., and John F. Winslow of Troy, both of them friends of Governor Seward and large manufacturers of iron plates, etc. Governor Seward furnished us with a strong letter of introduction to President Lincoln, who was at once greatly pleased with the simplicity of the plan and agreed to accompany us to the Navy Department at 11 A. M. the following day, and aid us as best he could. He was on hand promptly at 11 o'clock--the day before you returned from Hartford. Captain Fox, together with a part of the Naval Board, was present. Several naval officers were also present unofficially.- editors. All were surprised at the novelty of the plan. Some advised trying it; others ridiculed it. Tie conference was finally closed for that day by Mr. Lincoln's remarking, All I have to say is what the girl said when she put her foot into the stocking, It strikes me there's something in it. The following day Admiral Smith convened the whole board, when I presented a
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 12: the inauguration of President Lincoln, and the Ideas and policy of the Government. (search)
ntercepted dispatches disclosed the fact that Mr. Fox, who had been allowed to visit Major Andersonacity. Aided by the practical suggestions of Mr. Fox, he succeeded in convincing the President of to collision with the insurgents. He favored Mr. Fox's propositions, and that gentleman, with the ion of Governor Pickens, On that occasion, Mr. Fox carried a letter to Governor Pickens from GenHall, one of Anderson's trusty men, furnished Mr. Fox with a memorandum of supplies in Fort Sumter.der or evacuate the fort at noon on that day. Mr. Fox gave him no assurances, such as Judge Campbel as a military operation, he at once sent for Mr. Fox, and verbally authorized him March 29. to fif the 4th of April, when the President informed Fox that, in order that faith as to Sumter might bet, by force, as the Governor might choose. Mr. Fox arrived in the city of New York the second ti by Commodores Stewart and Stringham; and, as Mr. Fox's orders were imperative, he performed his du[4 more...]
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