hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 14 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 9 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 40 results in 13 document sections:

1 2
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 12: the inauguration of President Lincoln, and the Ideas and policy of the Government. (search)
he fort must be held at all hazards, Mr. Blair sent March 12. for his kinsman by marriage, Gustavus V. Fox, who had resigned his commission of lieutenant in the Navy several years before. Mr. Foxe, he performed his duty in spite of all official detentions, and with that professional Gustavus Vasa Fox. skill, untiring industry, and indomitable energy which, as Assistant Secretary of the Navy Department, or it would have been arrested there. It was calculated to prevent the success of Fox's expedition, because the Powhatan carried the sailors and launches provided for the landing of sd out, namely, one for the relief of Fort Sumter, and the other for the relief of Fort Pickens. Mr. Fox was not aware of the change in the destination of the Powhatan until he arrived off Charleston be appreciated by those who know their amount and value. The judgment and energy displayed by Mr. Fox caused him to be appointed Assistant Secretary of the Navy. He was then in the prime of life,
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 13: the siege and evacuation of Fort Sumter. (search)
nd the effect of the cannonade and bombardment from the ironclad battery there. observations, reported, to the infinite delight of the garrison, that through the vail of the misty air he saw vessels bearing the dear old flag. They were a part of Fox's relief squadron, namely, the Pawnee, ten guns; the Harriet Lane, five guns, and the transport Baltic. They signaled greetings by dipping their flags. Sumter could not respond, for its ensign was entangled in the halliards, which had been cut bn Hartstene soon returned, accompanied by Captain Gillis, commander of the Pocahontas; and at about the same time the Charleston steamer Isabel, provided by the military authorities at that city for carrying the garrison out to the Baltic, where Mr. Fox was waiting to receive them, approached the fort. When every thing was in readiness, the battle-torn flag which had been unfurled over Fort Sumter almost four months before, with prayers for the protection of those beneath it, was raised above
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 16: career of the Anglo-Confederate pirates.--closing of the Port of Mobile — political affairs. (search)
Georgia as a pirate ship. and the Alabama see picture of the Alabama, on page 571. had made her last cruise. It had been a long and prosperous one in the South Atlantic and Indian oceans, during which she had captured sixty-seven vessels, of which forty-five were destroyed. She returned to European waters early in the summer of 1864, and took refuge in the French harbor of Cherbourg. At that time the United States steamer Kearsarge, this name was given to the vessel by the wife of G. V. Fox, then the efficient Assistant Secretary of the Navy, who was the daughter of the late Levi Woodbury, of New Hampshire. It was the Indian name of a mountain in her native State. commanded by Captain John A. Winslow, was lying in the Dutch port of Flushing. The American consul at Cherbourg immediately informed Winslow, by telegraph, of the presence of the Alabama, when he left Flushing and proceeded, with the Kearsarge, to look after the pirate ship. the Kearsarge appeared off Cherbourg
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 17: Sherman's March through the Carolinas.--the capture of Fort Fisher. (search)
pe, the effects of which supported his opinion, that success would not attend the experiment there proposed to be tried. This report was submitted to the War Department on the 18th of November, 1864. Reports were also submitted by other experts, among them Captain Henry A. Wise, chief of the Bureau of Ordnance, who gave it as his opinion that no serious damage would be done beyond 500 yards from the point of explosion. A consultation of several experts was held, Nov. 23. by direction of Mr. Fox, the Assistant Secretary of the Navy, at the residence of Captain Wise. The subject was then fully discussed, and it was concluded that it was worth while to try the experiment, with the hope that the explosion might so paralyze the garrison for a few hours, that the troops might land and take possession, and so close the harbor of Wilmington. These caused some delay in the movements of the navy, and the expedition was not ready to sail before the 13th of December. The troops destined f
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 21: closing events of the War.--assassination of the President. (search)
ola, Key West, along the Florida sea-board, the sea-coast Islands, Charleston, and the borders of North Carolina, and even in holding Fortress Monroe and Norfolk? The energy displayed by the Navy Department, under the chief management of Gustavus Vasa Fox, See page 308, volume I. the Assistant Secretary of the Navy, was most remarkable. The weakness and the position of the navy in the spring of 1861 have already been noticed. See page 299, volume I. It was a navy reduced to smallest perce, by a strict blockade. Foreign nations protested and menaced, but the work was done. There were no dock-yards or workmen adequate to construct the vessels needed for the service, yet, such was the energy of the Department, in the hands of Mr. Fox, that an unrelaxing blockade was maintained for four years, from the capes of the Chesapeake to the Rio Grande, while a flotilla of gun-boats, protecting and aiding the army in its movements, penetrated and patroled our rivers, through an intern
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The organization of the Federal Navy (search)
rrow channels, and her gallant commander, Theodorus Bailey, had to lead the fleet at New Orleans past the forts in another vessel. On September 14, 1861, at Pensacola, volunteers from the Colorado's crew in four boats, led by Lieutenant J. H. Russell, carried off a cutting out expedition. They drove the stubbornly resisting crew from the Confederate privateer Judah and destroyed the vessel. him with the details of department work. Under Welles, as assistant secretary, was appointed Gustavus V. Fox, a brilliant naval officer, whose eighteen years in the service had well fitted him for the work he was to take up, and whose talents and foresight later provided valuable aid to the secretary. At the head of the bureau of yards and docks was Joseph Smith, whose continuous service in the navy for nearly a half-century and whose occupancy of the position at the head of the bureau from 1845 had qualified him also to meet the unlooked — for emergency of war. Under the direction of the
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), First expeditions of the Federal Navy (search)
th provisions and reinforcements for Major Anderson's little garrison. As the vessels approached Charleston Harbor, before daylight of April 12th, they heard the boom of shotted guns; and in the gray dawn, smoke rose sullenly in the direction of Sumter. When daylight disclosed the Stars and Stripes still waving over the fort, amid the roar of heavy artillery, Commander Stephen Clegg Rowan, of the Pawnee, immediately volunteered to run his vessel in to the relief of the garrison. Lieutenant Gustavus V. Fox, later Assistant Secretary of the Federal Navy, in command of this expedition, would not consent to such a perilous undertaking, and the fleet lay helplessly by until the surrender of the heroic defenders at four o'clock in the afternoon of the 13th. The next day the garrison was taken off in the Baltic. The Pawnee was next assigned to patrol duty in the Potomac, and on May 24th, in cooperation with the zouaves of the lamented Ellsworth, compelled the Confederates to evacuate Ale
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The birth of the ironclads (search)
tinued to participate in the closing operations of the navy on the James. Of this class of double-turreted monitors the Monadnock and the Miantonomoh startled the world after the war was over. Foreign and domestic skeptics maintained that Gustavus Vasa Fox, Assistant Secretary of the Navy, who had earnestly advocated the construction of monitors while the type was still an experiment, had merely succeeded in adding so many iron coffins to the navy. It was asserted that no monitor would proveavy weather, to say nothing of being able to cross the ocean. In the spring of 1866, therefore, the Navy Department determined to despatch the Miantonomoh across the Atlantic; and, to show his faith in the iron coffins he had advocated, Assistant Secretary Fox embarked on her at St. John, N. B., on June 5th. Meanwhile the Monadnock had been despatched around the Horn to San Francisco; her progress was watched with far greater enthusiasm than that of the Oregon during the Spanish War. The Mian
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The actions with the forts (search)
g it fast there. The admiral said, Never mind, I'm all right, but I went ahead and obeyed orders. Later Farragut, undoing the lashing with his own hands, climbed higher still. The Hartford just after the battle of Mobile Bay Quartermaster Knowles Farragut at the pinnacle of his fame Leaning on the cannon, Commander David Glasgow Farragut and Captain Percival Drayton, chief of staff, stand on the deck of the Hartford, after the victory in Mobile Bay, of August, 1864. When Gustavus V. Fox, Assistant Secretary of the Navy, proposed the capture of New Orleans from the southward he was regarded as utterly foolhardy. All that was needed, however, to make Fox's plan successful was the man with spirit enough to undertake it and judgment sufficient to carry it out. Here on the deck of the fine new sloop-of-war that had been assigned to him as flagship, stands the man who had just accomplished a greater feat that made him a world figure as famous as Nelson. The Confederacy had
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fox, Gustavus Vasa 1821-1883 (search)
Fox, Gustavus Vasa 1821-1883 Naval officer; born in Saugus, Mass., June 13, 1821; appointed to the United States navy Jan. 12, 1838; resigned with the rank of lieutenant July 10, 1856; was sent to Fort Sumter for the purpose of opening communication with Major Anderson. Before the expedition reached Charleston the Confederates had opened fire on Fort Sumter and forced Major Anderson to surrender. He was subsequently appointed assistant Secretary of the Navy, and held this post until the end of the war. He planned operations of the navy, including the capture of New Orleans. He was sent by the United States government on the monitor Miantonomoh to convey the congratulations of the United States Congress to Alexander II. on his escape from assassination. This was the longest voyage that had ever been made by a monitor. His visit to Russia materially aided the acquisition of Alaska by the United States government. He died in New York City, Oct. 29, 1883.
1 2