Your search returned 52 results in 25 document sections:

1 2 3
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
im, without yielding an iota, merely by the unpretending simplicity and sincerity of his manner. He is said to resemble Mr. Fox in his face, and certainly is like Mr. Fox's busts; but I should think there was more mildness in his physiognomy than IMr. Fox's busts; but I should think there was more mildness in his physiognomy than I can find in Mr. Fox's portraits. Sir James Mackintosh is a little too precise, a little too much made up in his manners and conversation, but is at the same time very exact, definite, and logical in what he says, and, I am satisfied, seldom has Mr. Fox's portraits. Sir James Mackintosh is a little too precise, a little too much made up in his manners and conversation, but is at the same time very exact, definite, and logical in what he says, and, I am satisfied, seldom has occasion to regret a mistake or an error, where a matter of principle or reasoning is concerned, though, as he is a little given to affect universal learning, he may sometimes make a mistake in matters of fact. As a part of a considerable literary o it, all the little, trim, gay pleasure-boats must keep well out of the way of his great black collier, as Gibbon said of Fox. He listens carefully and fairly—and with a kindness that would be provoking, if it were not genuine—to all his adversary
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
ity, bold and frank in expressing all his opinions and feelings. . . . I dined at Lord Holland's, in his venerable and admirable establishment at Holland House. The party was small, but it was select. Lord and Lady Holland, and Mr. Allen; Colonel Fox, and his wife Lady Mary, the daughter of the present king; Earl Grey, who has such preponderating influence now, without being Minister; Lord Melbourne, the Premier himself; Mr. Labouchere, Henry Labouchere, afterwards Lord Taunton, travell—and the party was very small and at a round table,—I did not perceive his arrival, or suspect who he was, until I was introduced to him some moments afterwards. Another thing struck me, too; the King was alluded to very unceremoniously when Lady Mary Fox was not present. Without saying directly that he had done a very vulgar thing, Lord Melbourne said the King had actually, the day before yesterday, proposed fourteen toasts and made a quantity of speeches at his own table; intending to be un
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 22: (search)
but it is in the state in which it was when the famous Strafford sat there, and has his arms ill cut in several places. . . . . I could not help imagining how things looked when he was there, and the great Marquis of Rockingham, and when Burke and Fox sat there, as they often did, with the late Lord Fitzwilliam. I had many strange visions about it, and little heeded poor old Mr. Lowe. . . . We lounged slowly home through the grounds and gardens. . . . After lunch, Lord Fitzwilliam said he sicient, good-tempered, and sagacious support for it, both in committee and in the House, and carried it, with Copley's aid, in every stage, and in every way, except debate. Lord Spencer talked to me, too, a great deal about his recollections of Fox, Pitt, and Sheridan, placing the latter much lower than his party usually does, and giving more praise to Pitt than I ever heard a Whig give him. He does not talk brilliantly,—he hardly talks well, for he hesitates, blushes even, and has a queer
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
, 439-445. Flahault, Count, 277. Flahault, Countess, 277. Fletcher, Miss, 279, 433and note, 434. Fletcher, Mrs., 279 and note, 433, 434. Florence, visits, 183. Follen, Dr., Charles, Professor at Harvard College, 351, 352, 338 note. Folsom, Charles, 389, 390. Forbes, Captain, 262. Forbes, Hon., Francis, 458, 459, 461, 463, 477, 478, 486, 489. Forbin, Count, 255, 257. Forster, Hofrath Friedrich, 493, 495. Forster, Professor, Karl, 475, 482. Fox, Colonel C. J., 408. Fox, Lady, Mary, 408, 409. Francisco, Don, Prince of Spain, 206. Frankfort-on-Main, visits, 122. Franklin, Benjamin, 286. Franklin, Lady, 425. Franklin Public School, Boston, Elisha Ticknor, Principal of, 2. Franklin, Sir, John, 419, 420, 421, 422, 425. Freeman, Rev. Dr. J., 17, 35, 53. Frere, John Hookham, 264, 267. Frisbie, Professor, 355, 356. Froriep, L. F. von, 454, 455, 457. Fuller, Captain, 61. Fulton's Steam Frigates, 27. Funchal, Count, 177, 179, 263. G Gagern, Bar
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 18: (search)
t I was really touched with their kindness in coming to see me at all. But on Friday they will be here again for a few hours, and I shall hope to find them just a moment, to thank them. Afterwards I went to see the Lyells, for they go off to-morrow, and I do not want to take leave of them in the midst of a great party, where I am to meet them to-night. I need not tell you I was sorry to bid them good by. They have been as kind and true as they always are . . . . I then went first to General Fox's, Son of the third Lord Holland. where I found the same sort of hearty kindness I always have, and where I took one of the party I found lounging there and went to a grand matinee at Holland House. . . . . Nothing of the sort could well be finer. The wind had come round to the north, so that it was cool enough; and, passing through the house, . . . . the company came out into the park, where all the fashionable society of London seemed collected in picturesque groups under the magnif
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 23: (search)
rations, 1783-1830, I read the first article, which is largely about American affairs; and as I went on, I kept saying to myself, He ought to have been a judge, he ought to have been Lord Chancellor. Nothing in the way of investigation seems ever to escape him, and when all his facts are brought together, then comes in his judicial fairness, and makes everything clear, as measured by some recognized principle. See what he says about Lord Shelburne's career, and especially what he says about Fox's mistake in joining Lord North. I do not know anything like it in political history. Romilly and Horner had a good deal of the same character; but, though they came to as fair and honest results as anybody, they were both practising lawyers, and preserved something of the air of advocates, in the form and turn of their discussions. Perhaps Lewis might have had the same air if he had been in the courts, and had had clients to conciliate as well as to serve. As it is, we get, I think, in h
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
ard, II. 255 and note, 256 note, 259, 322, 385. Forster, Hofrath Friedrich, I. 493, 495. Forster, Professor, Karl, I. 475, 482, II. 480 and note. Forti, II. 48, 88. Fossombroni, Count, II. 49. Foster, Sir, Augustus, II. 40, 41. Fox, Colonel C. J. (General), I. 408, II. 370. Fox, Lady, Mary, I. 408, 409. Francisco, Don, Prince of Spain, I. 206. Frankfort-on-Main, visits, I.122. Franklin, Benjamin, I. 286. Franklin, Lady, I. 425. Franklin Public School, Boston, Elisha TFox, Lady, Mary, I. 408, 409. Francisco, Don, Prince of Spain, I. 206. Frankfort-on-Main, visits, I.122. Franklin, Benjamin, I. 286. Franklin, Lady, I. 425. Franklin Public School, Boston, Elisha Ticknor principal of, I. 2. Franklin, Sir, John, I. 419, 420, 421, 422, 425. Freeman, Rev. Dr. J., I. 17, 85, 53. Frere, John Hookham, I. 264, 267, II. 46 Friday Club, II. 445 and note. Frisbie, Professor, I. 855, 356. Fromel, Mr., Paul, II. 313. Froriep, L. F. von, I. 454, 455, 457. Fry, Elizabeth, II. 134. Fuller, Captain, I. 61. Fullerton, Lord, II. 16. Fullerton, Mrs., II. 168. Fulton's steam frigates, I. 27. Funchal, Count, I. 177, 179, 263. G Gabrielli
Discharged --A negro girl, named Maria, the property of Mary Fox, arrested for stealing a gold watch and chain from Mary Blinis, was discharged by the Mayor, yesterday.
Runaways. --A reward of ten dollars each will be paid for the apprehension and delivery in the City Jail, or at the Midlothian Mines, in Chesterfield county, of the following named negro me--. viz: Ellic, belonging to J. S. Middleton; Bon and Jim, to E Green; Jon and Jim, to Hill Bradford; Jon, to Mrs. Mary Fox; Robert, to J. C. Spindle; Jacob, to Lawrence Muse; John, to Net Tyler; William, to Mr. Brown; Edward, to J. C. Crum,; William, to B. D. Boy; Iverson, to J. S. Lacy; Edwin, to Joseph H. Poindexter; Henry to Andrew E. Ellett; Jon, to Dr. G. M. Pollard; Jacob to Jails Council; Jon, to James H Panamore, Jon, to J K Dabney, Charles, to Dr. Wm Taliaferro; Ralph, to Mrs. E. W. Roy; Henry, to Jno. P. Tabb; Marcellus, to P T Burras; William, to J. W. Winston; Booker, to Midlothian Company Should any of the above Negroes have returned to their home, the owners will please advise me, or if impressed into public service, information as to their location will be thankfully received b
The Daily Dispatch: June 16, 1862., [Electronic resource], Bill to be entitled "an act to further provide for the public residence. (search)
Runaways. --A reward of ten dollars each will be paid for the apprehension and delivery in the City Jail, or at the Midlothian Mines, in Chesterfield county, of the following named negro men — viz:Ellic belonging to J. S. Middleton; Bon and Jim to E. Green; Jon and Jim; to Hill Bradford; Jon, to Mrs. Mary Fox; Robert, to J C. Spindle; Jacob, to Lawrence Muse; John, to Nat Tyler; William, to Mr. Brown; Edward, to J. C. Crump; William, to B. D. Roy; Iverson, to J. S. Lacy; Edwin, to Joseph H. Poindexter; Henry, to Andrew E. Ellett; Jon, to Dr. G. M. Pollard; Jacob to Julia Cogsil; Jon. to James H. Penamore, Jon, to J. K. Dabney, Charles, to Dr. Wm. Taliaferro; Ralph, to Mrs. E. W. Roy; Henry, to Jno. P. Tabb; Marcellus, to P. T. Burrust; William, to J. W. Winston Booker, to Midlothian Company. Should any of the above Negroes have returned to their homes, the owners will please advise me, or if impressed into public service, information as to their location will be thankfully re
1 2 3