Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Charles Fox or search for Charles Fox in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestral (search)
could claim as near relationship to him as could any of her generation. She was extremely proud of this kinship, and no one who knew her could doubt that from the Marions she inherited many vital qualities. One winter, toward the end of her life, there was a meeting at the Old South Church at which — as at the gathering described at the beginning of this chapter — there was talk of ancestry and kindred topics. The weather was stormy, our mother well on in the eighties, but she was there. Being called on to speak, she made a brief address in the course of which she alluded to her Southern descent, and to General Francis Marion, her great-great-uncle. As she spoke her eyes lightened with mirth, in the way we all remember: General Marion, she said, was known in his generation as the Swamp Fox ; and when I succeed in eluding the care of my guardians, children and grandchildren, and coming to a meeting like this, I think I may be said to have inherited some of his characteristic
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 14: the sundown splendid and serene 1906-1907; aet. 87-88 (search)
My last day in my dear son's house. He and Fannie have been devotedly kind to me. They made me occupy their room, much to my bodily comfort, but to the great disquiet of my mind, as I hated much to inconvenience them. My son has now a very eminent position.... God bless the house and all in it. December 17. The Old South Chapter of D. A.R.'s, met in the real Old South Church; there was much good speaking. I recited my Battle Hymn and boasted my descent from General Marion, the Swamp Fox, saying also, When, eluding the vigilance of children and grandchildren, I come to such a meeting as this, without a previous promise not to open my lips, I think that I show some of the dexterity of my illustrious relative. I also had to spring up and tell them that my grandmother, niece to General Marion, gave her flannel petticoat to make cartridges for the soldiers of the Revolution. The path of the guardian (or jailer, as she sometimes put it) was not always plain. The wayfaring wo
, Mr., II, 62. Five of Clubs, I, 74, 110, 128; II, 74. Flibbertigibbet, II, 144, 145, 367. Florence, I, 175. Florida, II, 268. Flower, Constance, II, 168. Flynt, Baker, II, 230. Foley, Margaret, I, 227, 237. Forbes, John, II, 279. Forbes, John M., II, 109, 177. Foresti, Felice, I, 94, 104. Fort Independence, I, 346. Forum, II, 182. Foster, L. S., I, 248. Foulke, Dudley, I, 365; II, 188. Foundling Hospital, II, 8. Fowler, O. S., I, 98, 99. Fox, Charles, II, 265. France, I, 131, 300, 308, 310; II, 9, 20, 26, 34. Francis, Eliza C., I, 18, 25, 26, 27, 31, 42, 103, 150, 230; II, 319. Francis, J. W., I, 18, 19, 26, 27, 36, 42, 57, 114, 150; II, 251. Francis, V. M., II, 362. Franco-Prussian War, I, 300; I, 13, 20. Franklin, Benjamin, I, 6. Fredericksburg, I, 192. Free Religious Club, see Radical Club. Freeman, Edward, I, 95, 134. Freeman, Mrs., Edward, I, 95, 134. Fremdenblatt, II, 19. French Revolution, I,