Browsing named entities in Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley. You can also browse the collection for James Francis or search for James Francis in all documents.

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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.5 (search)
irst seeds of distrust in a child's heart. Francis, soured by misfortune, brutal of temper, and ur lacerated bodies could bear no more. James Francis had been a working collier at Mold until h a Sunday evening in the early part of 1849. Francis was reading aloud to us the 41st chapter of G and correct answers, that he exclaimed, Why, Francis, you have quite a young Erasmus here. The ve removed from our minds the impression that Francis was accountable for Willie's death. For wee sign of God's favour in milder treatment by Francis. I cannot recollect that the season which arance portended a change in my condition. Francis came up to me during the dinner-hour, when al as much, we believed, to the satisfaction of Francis as to the anguish of poor Barney. Bishop Shat my reputation spread wide in our circle. Francis affected to believe that I was destined for an, was the result of the folly and tyranny of Francis. Boys are curious creatures, innocent as ang[11 more...]
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.7 (search)
d, it would be a pity to deprive them of this miserable consolation. The discipline of the Windermere was well begun by the time I regained health. It was the pride of the officers that, though the Windermere was not a Black-ball packet, she was big and smart enough to be one, and they were resolved that the customs of the Black-Baller should prevail on board, and that the discipline should be of the same quality. Whether it came up to the regulation standard I do not know, but just as Francis flogged, beat, and pummelled the infants under his charge, so the ruffian mates stormed, swore, and struck or booted the full-grown wretches on board the Windermere. The captain was too high and mighty to interfere, or he may have issued his orders to that purpose, and was satisfied with the zealous service of his mates: at any rate, I scarcely heard his voice except during gales of wind, and then it was stern and strident. Strange to say, the majority of the sailors preferred the Ameri
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.19 (search)
, Yes! Bennett. This was the answer put into my hand the same day at 135, Fleet Street. You may imagine my feelings, as I read the simple monosyllable which was my commission: bales, packages, boxes, trunks, bills, letters, flowing in a continuous stream; the writing, telegraphing, and nervous hurry and flurry of each day's work, until we sailed! Follow me in thought to the deck of the steam-ferry across the English Channel; fancy that you hear my plucky fisher-boys from the Medway, Francis and Edward Pocock, who, with Frederick Barker, were his only white companions in the expedition. All three did gallant work, and not one returned.--D. S. saying to the white cliffs of Dover, Good-bye, dear England! and if for ever, then for ever good-bye, O England! Think of us a few weeks later, arrived at Zanzibar, where we make our final preparations for the long journey we are about to make. Zanzibar is an island, as I suppose you know, situate three hundred and sixty-nine miles s
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
f, in founding the Congo State, 333, 3 4, 338, 406; belittles Stanley's work, 400; in East Africa, 422; and South Africa, 487-500; thoughts on returning to, 528; changes in, in forty years, 529, 530. Evangelides, Christo, 230-236. Felkin, Dr. R. W., his picture of Emin, 353, 354. Fetish, the, and Ngalyema, 339-342. Ffynnon Beuno, 42-47, 51-55. Fisher, Fort, Stanley writes account of attack on, 220, 221. Flamini, Francois, 345. Foraging, in the American Civil War, 180. Francis, James, 12-16, 32-34. Furze Hill, 506-514. Galton, Sir, Francis, 286, 287. Garstin, Sir, William, on the importance of Stanley's discoveries, 404, 405. Genealogy, 3. Generalship, American, fault of, 178. Germany, in East Africa, 422. Ghost stories, 8, 9. Gladstone, W. E., Stanley's interview with, 419-421; as a speaker, 479, 480. Goff, Mr., 65. Gordon, General, Stanley's view of character of, 338, 526; massacre of, 353; Stanley on death of, 396, 397, 537, 538. Goree,