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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 104 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 26 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 24 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 10 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The battle of Franklin-the battle of Nashville (search)
i to watch him. On the 17th of November Hood started and moved in such a manner as to avoid Schofield, thereby turning his position. Hood had with him three infantry corps, commanded respectively by Stephen D. Lee, [Alexander P.] Stewart and [B. Franklin] Cheatham. These, with his cavalry, numbered about forty-five thousand men. Schofield had, of all arms, about thirty thousand. Thomas's orders were, therefore, for Schofield to watch the movements of the enemy, but not to fight a battle if h rains of a few days before had swelled the stream into a mad torrent, impassable except on bridges. Unfortunately, either through a mistake in the wording of the order or otherwise, the pontoon bridge which was to have been sent by rail out to Franklin, to be taken thence with the pursuing column, had gone toward Chattanooga. There was, consequently, a delay of some four days in building bridges out of the remains of the old railroad bridge. Of course Hood got such a start in this time that
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cornwallis, Lord Charles 1738-1805 (search)
ed British rights and was just. Good God! exclaimed Burke, are we yet to be told of the rights for which we went to war? O excellent rights! O valuable rights! Valuable you should be, for we have paid dear in parting with you. O valuable rights! that have cost Britain thirteen provinces, four islands, 100,000 men, and more than £ 70,000,000 ($350,000,000) of money. At the beginning of March Conway's proposition was adopted. Lord North, who, under the inspiration of the King, had misled the nation for twelve years, was relieved from office, and he and his fellow-ministers were succeeded by friends of peace. The King stormed, but was compelled to yield. Parliament resolved to end the war, and the King acquiesced with reluctance. Early in May (1782) Sir Guy Carleton arrived in New York, bearing propositions to Congress for reconciliation, and Richard Oswald, a London merchant, was sent to Paris as a diplomatic agent to confer with Franklin on the subject of a treaty of peace.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cox, Jacob Dolson 1828- (search)
He was admitted to the bar in 1852, and practised in Warren, O., until elected State Senator, in 1859. He was appointed brigadier-general of State militia, and commanded a camp of instruction, in April, 1861, and in May was made brigadier-general of volunteers, doing good service in western Virginia. In August, 1862, he was assigned to the Army of Virginia, under General Pope, and in the fall was ordered to the district of the Kanawha. After the death of Reno, at South Mountain, he commanded the 9th Army Corps. He was in command of the district of Ohio in 1863; served in the Atlanta campaign in 1864; and was promoted to major-general in December of that year. He served in Sherman's army early in 1865; was governor of Ohio in 1866-68; Secretary of the Interior under President Grant, in 1869-70; and Representative in Congress in 1877-79. He published Atlanta; The March to the sea; Franklin and Nashville; The second battle of Bull Run, etc. He died in Magnolia, Mass., Aug. 4, 1900.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dana, Francis, 1743-1811 (search)
Dana, Francis, 1743-1811 Jurist; born in Charlestown, Mass., June 13, 1743; son of Richard Dana; graduated at Harvard in 1762. He was admitted to the bar in 1767; was an active patriot; a delegate to the Provincial Congress in 1774; went to England in 1775 with confidential letters to Franklin; was a member of the executive council from 1776 to 1780; member of the Continental Congress from 1776 to 1778, and again in 1784; member of the board of war, Nov. 17, 1777; and was at the head of a committee charged with the entire reorganization of the army. When Mr. Adams went on an embassy to negotiate a treaty of peace and commerce with Great Britain, Mr. Dana was secretary of the legation. At Paris, early in 1781, he received the appointment from Congress of minister to Russia, clothed with power to make the accession of the United States to the armed neutrality. He resided two years at St. Petersburg, and returned to Berlin in 1783. He was again in Congress in the spring of 178
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Deane, Silas, 1737-1789 (search)
ion of a treaty of amity and alliance between the two nations. To him were intrusted the receipts and expenditures of money by the commissioners to Europe. Dr. Franklin had deserved confidence in his ability and honesty. The jealous, querulous Arthur Lee (q. v.), who became associated with him and Franklin, soon made trouble.Franklin, soon made trouble. He wrote letters to his brother in Congress (Richard Henry Lee), in which he made many insinuations against the probity of both his colleagues. Ralph Izard, commissioner to the Tuscan Court, offended because he was not consulted about the treaty with France, had written home similar letters; and William Carmichael, a secretary cost him his place. He was compelled to resign his secretaryship. The discussion among the diplomatic agents soon led to the recall of all of them excepting Dr. Franklin, who remained sole minister at the French Court. Deane, who was undoubtedly an able, honest man, preferred claims for services and private expenditures abroad
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Franklin, Benjamin 1706-1790 (search)
re now my enemy, and I am yours.— B. Franklin. Late in the autumn of 1776 Dr. Franklin was sent as a diplomatic agent to France in the ship Reprisal. The passage and that they would be forever independent States. On the morning of Dec. 28, Franklin, with the other commissioners (Silas Deane and Arthur Lee), waited upon Vergen attachment of the French nation to the American cause; requested a paper from Franklin on the condition of America; and that, in future, intercourse with the sage mindship between these two distinguished men became strong and abiding. He told Franklin that as Spain and France were in perfect accord he might communicate freely wits to American vessels. Vindication of the colonies. On June. 15, 1775, Franklin issued the following address to the public: Forasmuch as the enemies of Aities may as far exceed hers as hers have exceeded ours, we hope we shall be Franklin in French Society. reasonable enough to rest satisfied with her proportionable
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Treaties, Franco-American (search)
rent. Privateering was to be restricted, not abolished; and while the Americans were not willing to make common cause with the French, they were willing to agree not to assist Great Britain in the war on France, nor trade with that power in goods contraband of war. The commissioners sent to negotiate the treaty were authorized to promise that, in case France should become involved in the war, neither party should make a definitive treaty of peace without six months notice to the other. Franklin, Deane, and Lee were United States commissioners at the French Court at the close of 1776. The Continental Congress had elaborated a plan of a treaty with France, by which it was hoped the States might secure their independence. The commissioners were instructed to press for an immediate declaration of the French government in favor of the Americans. Knowing the desire of the French to widen the breach and cause a dismemberment of the British Empire, the commissioners were to intimate th
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: Franklin (search)
my Enemy,and I am Yours, B. Franklin. As Franklin was sixty-nine years old in 1775, he might fa79), The whistle (1779), The dialogue between Franklin and the gout (1780.) In 1784 he resumed work is point of embarkation at Havre de Grace. Franklin arrived in Philadelphia in September, 1785, r 1789, as President of the Abolition Society, Franklin signed a memorial against slavery which was lghty-fifth year. In the matter of religion Franklin was distinctly a product of the eighteenth-ceuous jewel in his crown of virtues than did Dr. Franklin. And when one has pointed out that the pruf Sir Thomas Browne to make his heart elate. Franklin had nothing of what pietists call a realizing It is perhaps in the field of politics that Franklin exhibits the most marked development of his p for co-operation in the task of subduing it. Franklin was so far a Baconian that he sought to avoidhand demands deliberate preconsideration. To Franklin, the ordering of his matter must have become [1 more...]
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: colonial newspapers and magazines, 1704-1775 (search)
Chapter 7: colonial newspapers and magazines, 1704-1775 Elizabeth Christine Cook, Ph.D., Instructor in English in Teachers College, Columbia University. Literature in the colonial newspapers. the New England Courant. the New England weekly journal. Franklin as journalist. advertisements of books. the South Carolina gazette. the Virginia gazette. politics in the later newspapers. the vogue of French radicalism. the Massachusetts spy. magazines. the General magazine and historical chronicle. the American magazine. the Pennsylvania magazine. the Royal American magazine The development of the colonial press coincides with a period often regarded as narrowly provincial in American literature. That spirit of adventure which enlivens the early historical narratives had settled into a thrifty concern with practical affairs, combined with an exaggerated interest in fine-spun doctrinal reasoning. The echoes of Spenser and other Elizabethans to be heard in some few P
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 3: the Philadelphia period (search)
long friends; you are now my enemy, and I am, Yours, B. Franklin. On the third of October, Franklin again writes to Priestley: Tell our dear good friend, Dr. Price, who sometimes had his doubts ahe boat with us, and were waiting to go farther. Every sentence ends with a snap. Probably Franklin eating his rolls in the street is the best-known figure in American history, after Washington ato notice in this connection that Order stands third among the thirteen practical virtues which Franklin early tabulated and set himself to acquire; a whimsical digest of the system of thrifty morality which he perceived to be at the basis of worldly success. Franklin lacked spiritual power — the imaginative grasp of truth which belongs to creative minds. He had, however, what is perhaps the bese range of his power as a moralist, and the secret of his success as a man. The Portfolio Franklin was born in Boston, but his distinctive flavor belonged to a city where the literary touch was
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