hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 48 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 54 results in 6 document sections:

Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
gaged on the Federal side composed the division of Franklin. It was a spirited affair, the Hampton legion iix prisoners were taken. The reported loss of General Franklin was, killed 48, wounded 10, captured 28; total 186. After the affair, General Franklin reported it a success for his division, and concluded by congratult, was immediately in observation of the troops of Franklin at Eltham, and of General McClellan's main advanceroken up and the roads approaching it obstructed. Franklin, with two divisions and a brigade, stood on the sowas thundering at Franklin with his artillery, and Franklin was preventing his passage of White Oak, McClellan, and put White Oak swamp on his right, guarded by Franklin, and his five divisions in his center to meet the ch the field of battle on the 30th. Jackson, whom Franklin stopped at White Oak, served no other purpose on tthe field under the cover of darkness, followed by Franklin from White Oak, to take their places in McClellan'
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
Shirley mortally wounded, and Lieut. H. F. Scaife and 15 of the battery more or less severely wounded. Sergt. B. T. Glenn continued to work his piece long after receiving a very severe wound. Captain Boyce mentions all his officers, Lieutenants Jeter, Porter, Scaife and Monro, and Sergeants Glenn, Humphreys, Bunch, and Young, and Corporals Rutland, Byrd, Watts and Schartle; and Privates Scaife, Garner, Hodges, Shirley, Simpson, Gondelock, A. Sim, L. H. Sims, Willard, Peek, Gossett and Franklin, for distinguished gallantry in the battles from the Rappahannock to Antietam. Colonel McMaster, of the Seventeenth South Carolina, Evans' brigade, reports that he carried into the battle only 59 officers and men, so great had been his losses from sickness and wounds and straggling. Out of these he lost 19 in battle. There are no separate returns of the losses of Evans' brigade at Boonsboro gap and Sharpsburg, but in these two they are reported as follows: Holcombe legion, 18 wounded;
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
nt. Accordingly, on December 1st, Jackson was in position on Longstreet's right, and General Lee's army was united. General Burnside's army was arranged in three grand divisions—right, center and left—commanded by Generals Sumner, Hooker and Franklin. In each grand division there were six divisions, with cavalry and numerous batteries attached. According to General Burnside's report, he had in battle line in Lee's front, December 13th, an army 113,000 strong. There were four brigades of nd two of the Ninth corps had now been beaten in detail in the attempt to carry the Confederate position. General Sumner's right grand division had been repulsed by three brigades and the artillery. General Burnside, bitterly disappointed that Franklin, with 60,000 troops, had not crushed Jackson and turned Lee's right, and unwilling to accept General Hooker's assurance that it was a hopeless task to attack the stone wall again, determined that it must be done, and ordered Hooker forward with
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
of which five sons were Confederate soldiers: Franklin, also a veteran of the Mexican war, who servelled in the night fight of Will's Valley. David Franklin was reared on his father's farm in Pickenszra Church, Jonesboro, Columbia, Spring Hill, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Nashville, and was with the re four brothers in the Confederate service: Dr. Franklin G., Adolphus A., John C., and Edwin P. Dr. ntain, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Lovejoy's Station, Franklin and Nashville. He commanded his company duri Missionary Ridge, Kenesaw Mountain, Atlanta, Franklin, and Nashville. He had but one furlough duri now Mrs. E. V. Baldy, of Bowling Green, Ky.; Franklin P., and Ivy D., the latter a student at the GHe is a member of Camp Marion, U. C. V. David Franklin miles David Franklin Miles was born neaayton Shell, surgeon of a Tennessee regiment; Franklin and John W., privates, Franklin being killed Franklin being killed at the battle of Cedar Run. Since the war Captain Shell has been a farmer, and in 1884 he was elect[2 more...]
The Daily Dispatch: June 4, 1861., [Electronic resource], Additional Foreign News by the America. (search)
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.from Camp Mayo. Camp Mayo, May 31, 1861. I have noticed a communication from Col. A Staples, of Patrick county; Va., complaining of injustice to Patrick, Henry and Franklin, by reporting those counties delinquent in the way of volunteers, and was surprised at the failure of the Colonel to speak of a company in the Southeastern part of his own county, then nearly made up, and since organized. Two of its members, Capt. John E. Penn and Lieut. J. G. Penn, are now in Richmond for the purpose of undergoing military drill, while the necessary outfit is being made. It is worthy of note that there are ten Penns in this company. A Second Lieutenant and three privates are grandsons, and the Captain, First Lieutenant, Orderly Sergeant and four privates, great grandsons of Col. Abram Penn, who rendered efficient service in the war of the Revolution, first, as Captain of a volunteer company, and afterwards as Colonel. Col. Penn was r
Terrible affray.-- man killed. --At Swan Lake, on the Arkansas river, some days since, David Franklin, a merchant, and Julius Dubose, got into a dispute over a game of cards, which they proposed to settle by a fight. Before they commenced, each declared he had no weapons; but, in the progress of the affray, Dubose drew a knife and stabbed Franklin severely between the shoulders, of which he died in about five minutes. Dubose fled, and the last heard of him he was in Vicksburg. A reward ohe Arkansas river, some days since, David Franklin, a merchant, and Julius Dubose, got into a dispute over a game of cards, which they proposed to settle by a fight. Before they commenced, each declared he had no weapons; but, in the progress of the affray, Dubose drew a knife and stabbed Franklin severely between the shoulders, of which he died in about five minutes. Dubose fled, and the last heard of him he was in Vicksburg. A reward of $500 has been offered for the arrest of the murderer.