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Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 229 3 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 158 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 138 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 107 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 104 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 65 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 59 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 52 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 45 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 20 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for William B. Franklin or search for William B. Franklin in all documents.

Your search returned 30 results in 10 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.14 (search)
he necessity of sending General Butler to another field of duty. . . . I have feared that it might become necessary to separate him and General Smith. The latter is really one of the most efficient officers in the service, readiest in expedients, and most skillful in the management of troops in action. I would dislike removing him from his present command unless it was to increase it, but, as I say, I may have to do it if General Butler remains. . . . I would feel strengthened with Smith, Franklin, or J. J. Reynolds commanding the right wing of this army. . . . So that on the 1st of July, 1864, General Grant thought he would be strengthened with General Smith commanding the right wing of that army. On the strength of that letter I was placed in command of the troops in the field belonging to the Army of the James, and General Butler was ordered back to administrative duty at Fort Monroe. Being much out of health at this time, I had asked for a short leave of absence, to which
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Red River campaign. (search)
ty in the South. Banks therefore confided to Franklin, under whom the Nineteenth Corps had been reo, designated to form part of the expedition. Franklin, when selected for this service, was the secodered that he would be strengthened by having Franklin to command the right wing of his army [see p.Red River and the Teche under A. J. Smith and Franklin, had evacuated Alexandria, removing all the mntly detached for service on the north bank. Franklin marched on the 6th of April, Lee's cavalry inwas taken by Walker's men in the first rush. Franklin, whose headquarters were with Cameron in fronneral A. J. Smith strongly opposed this. General Franklin proposed to march to Blair's Landing to ae 4th Wisconsin regiment, then serving on General Franklin's staff as chief engineer, and by hard an complete survey of the rapids.--R. B. I. General Franklin, himself a distinguished engineer, approvy correspondence; Banks was overslaughed, and Franklin quitted the department in disgust; Stone was [1 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Red River campaign. (search)
3d Ind., Capt. James M. Cockefair; 9th Ind., Capt. George R. Brown. Seventeenth Army Corps, Brig.-Gen. T. Kilby Smith. First Brigade, Col. Jonathan B. Moore: 41st Ill., Lieut.-Col. John H. Nale; 3d Iowa, Lieut.-Col. James Tullis; 33d Wis., Maj. Horatio H. Virgin. Second Brigade, Col. Lyman M. Ward: 81st Ill., Col. Andrew W. Rogers; 95th Ill., Col. Thos. W. Humphrey; 14th Wis., Capt. C. M. G. Mansfield. Artillery: M, 1st Mo., Lieut. John H. Tiemeyer. Nineteenth Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. William B. Franklin Also commanded the troops engaged at the battles of Sabine Cross-roads and Pleasant Hill. (w), Brig.-Gen. William H. Emory. first division, Brig.-Gen. William H. Emory, Brig.-Gen. J. W. McMillan. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William Dwight, Jr., Col. Geo. L. Beal: 29th Me., Col. George L. Beal; 114th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Henry B. Morse; 116th N. Y., Col. George M. Love; 153d N. Y., Col. Edwin P. Davis; 161st N. Y., Lieut.-Col. William B. Kinsey. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 6.49 (search)
ntrepidity of Mouton's division resulted in a complete victory over the forces engaged. The battle of Mansfield was not an intentional violation of my instructions on General Taylor's part. The Federal cavalry had pushed forward so far in advance of their column as to completely cover its movement, and General Taylor reported to me by dispatch at 12 meridian of the day on which the battle took place, that there was no advance made from Grand Ecore except of cavalry. In fact, however, General Franklin with his infantry was on the march and at once pushed forward to the support of the cavalry. When General Mouton with his division drove in the cavalry, he struck the head of Franklin's troops, and by a vigorous and able attack, without waiting for orders from Taylor, repulsed and drove back Franklin's advance and opened the battle of Mansfield, which, when Taylor came to the front, with his accustomed boldness and vigor he pushed to a complete success. [See p. 353.] Churchill, wi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 9.64 (search)
he army to within about two miles and in full view of the pike from Columbia to Spring Hill and Franklin. I here halted about 3 P. M., and requested General Cheatham, commanding the leading corps, anssession of the direct road. At early dawn the troops were put in motion in the direction of Franklin, marching as rapidly as possible to overtake the enemy before he crossed the Big Harpeth, eightCheatham followed immediately, and Lieutenant-General Lee in rear. Within about three miles of Franklin, the enemy was discovered on the ridge over which passes the turnpike. As soon as the Confederthe 6th of November to the 10th of December, which period includes the engagements at Columbia, Franklin, and of Forrest's cavalry. The enemy's estimate of our losses, as well as of the number of Con on or within the enemy's interior line of works. J. B. H. General J. D. Cox states in his Franklin and Nashville that the capture of 22 colors by Reilly and 10 by Opdycke was officially reported
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The death of Generals Cleburne and Adams. (search)
top of the parapet, undertook to grasp the old flag from the hands of our color-sergeant, when he fell, horse and all, shot by the color-guard. I was a reenlisted veteran, and went through twenty-seven general engagements, but I am sure that Franklin was the hardest-fought field that I ever stood upon. General J. D. Cox [in his Franklin and Nashville ] censures General Wagner for holding to his advanced position too long, calls his action a gross blunder, etc.; but, as one of Cox's men, I Franklin and Nashville ] censures General Wagner for holding to his advanced position too long, calls his action a gross blunder, etc.; but, as one of Cox's men, I looked upon the matter in a different light. I think if Cleburne had not struck Wagner's two brigades as he did that his brave lads would have broken our line successfully; but, as it was, his men were badly winded with his work with Wagner, which gave Opdycke's and White's men a better chance to check him at the cotton-gin. The way I saw it was this: I was acting as orderly and standing a few paces east of the cotton-gin. The first Confederate troops that; came in view were Stewart's corps o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Repelling Hood's invasion of Tennessee. (search)
8th, and forced back the Union cavalry on roads leading toward Spring Hill and Franklin. At 1 o'clock on the morning of the 29th General Wilson became convinced thaths of a mile east, commanding all the approaches View of the Winstead hills, Franklin, where Hood formed his line of battle. From a photograph: the right of Wagnerrom Spring Hill roads radiate to all points, the turnpike between Columbia and Franklin being there intersected by turnpikes from Rally Hill and Mount Carmel, as wellhompson's Station he sent his engineer officer, Captain William J. Twining, to Franklin, to telegraph the situation to General Thomas, all communication with whom had catching at a straw. Just before midnight Cox started from Spring Hill for Franklin, and was ordered to pick up Ruger at Thompson's Station. At 1 A. M. he was onooking up-stream. The left of the picture, is the north bank of the stream; Franklin is upon the south bank. Fort Granger, where General Schofield had his headqua
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Union cavalry in the Hood campaign. (search)
uare redoubt on the north side of the river. It was then dark and the arrangements for the withdrawal of the army to Nashville had been completed. Schofield and Stanley, the latter severely wounded, were together discussing the events of the day. After I had made my report Schofield thanked me for my services, and added: Your success is most important; it insures the safety of this army, for, notwithstanding our great victory to-day over Hood, we should not have been able to withdraw from Franklin, or to maintain ourselves there, but for the defeat and repulse of Forrest's cavalry, which was evidently aiming to turn our left flank and throw itself upon our line of retreat. He then gave me orders to hold the position till daylight the next morning, after which I should withdraw, covering the rear and flanks of the infantry as it marched toward Nashville. This duty was successfully performed with but little skirmishing. The infantry had already occupied the fortifications at Nashvil
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley. (search)
ac above Leesburg, entered the Valley of Virginia through Snicker's Gap. Afterward, crossing the Shenandoah at the ferry of the same name, he moved to Berryville, and there awaited developments. After the immediate danger to Washington had passed it became a question with General Grant and the authorities in Washington to select an officer who, commanding in the Valley, would prevent further danger from invasion. After various suggestions, On the 18th of July General Grant suggested Franklin for the command of the projected Middle Military Division, and, on this being objected to, proposed the assignment of Meade, with Hancock to command the Army of the Potomac and Gibbon for the Second Corps.--editors. Major-General Philip H. Sheridan was selected temporarily for this command. His permanent Major-General Wesley Merritt. From a photograph. occupation of the position was opposed by Secretary Stanton on the ground that he was too young for such important responsibility. On
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The battle of Bentonville. (search)
after V expelling the inhabitants and burning a part of the city, General Sherman ordered all railway tracks and buildings and all warehouses and public buildings that might be of military use to the Confederates to be destroyed, under the direction of Colonel O. M. Poe, Chief Engineer.--editors. it was evident to every one who had given a thought to the subject that his objective point was a junction with General Grant's army. The Army of Tennessee, after its disastrous repulse before Franklin, was, with its shattered columns, in rear instead of in front of Sherman's advancing forces, and thus he was allowed to make his march to Savannah a mere holiday excursion. At this latter point there was no adequate force to oppose him, and when Hardee, who commanded there, withdrew, the city fell an easy prey. The situation then was as follows: Sherman had established a new base, where communication with the sea was open to him, while Hardee's line extended from the Savannah River to Jam