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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 104 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 26 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 24 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 10 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for B. Franklin or search for B. Franklin in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 2 document sections:

Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: Franklin (search)
my Enemy,and I am Yours, B. Franklin. As Franklin was sixty-nine years old in 1775, he might fa79), The whistle (1779), The dialogue between Franklin and the gout (1780.) In 1784 he resumed work is point of embarkation at Havre de Grace. Franklin arrived in Philadelphia in September, 1785, r 1789, as President of the Abolition Society, Franklin signed a memorial against slavery which was lghty-fifth year. In the matter of religion Franklin was distinctly a product of the eighteenth-ceuous jewel in his crown of virtues than did Dr. Franklin. And when one has pointed out that the pruf Sir Thomas Browne to make his heart elate. Franklin had nothing of what pietists call a realizing It is perhaps in the field of politics that Franklin exhibits the most marked development of his p for co-operation in the task of subduing it. Franklin was so far a Baconian that he sought to avoidhand demands deliberate preconsideration. To Franklin, the ordering of his matter must have become [1 more...]
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: colonial newspapers and magazines, 1704-1775 (search)
Chapter 7: colonial newspapers and magazines, 1704-1775 Elizabeth Christine Cook, Ph.D., Instructor in English in Teachers College, Columbia University. Literature in the colonial newspapers. the New England Courant. the New England weekly journal. Franklin as journalist. advertisements of books. the South Carolina gazette. the Virginia gazette. politics in the later newspapers. the vogue of French radicalism. the Massachusetts spy. magazines. the General magazine and historical chronicle. the American magazine. the Pennsylvania magazine. the Royal American magazine The development of the colonial press coincides with a period often regarded as narrowly provincial in American literature. That spirit of adventure which enlivens the early historical narratives had settled into a thrifty concern with practical affairs, combined with an exaggerated interest in fine-spun doctrinal reasoning. The echoes of Spenser and other Elizabethans to be heard in some few P