Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Benjamin Franklin or search for Benjamin Franklin in all documents.

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pose of, should participate in the general suffering, and earnestly scan the political and social horizon in quest of sources and conditions of comprehensive and enduring relief, was inevitable. And thus industrial paralysis, commercial embarrassment, and political disorder, combined to overbear inveterate prejudice, sectional jealousy, and the ambition of local magnates, in creating that more perfect Union, whereof the foundations were laid and the pillars erected by Washington, Hamilton, Franklin, Madison, and their compeers, in the Convention which framed the Federal Constitution. Yet it would not be just to close this hasty and casual glance at our country, under the old federation, without noting some features which tend to relieve the darkness of the picture. The abundance and excellence of the timber, which still covered at least two-thirds of the area of the then States, enabled the common people to supply themselves with habitations, which, however rude and uncomely, were
The original draft of the Declaration of American Independence was first communicated by Mr. Jefferson separately to two of his colleagues, John Adams and Benjamin Franklin, on the committee chosen by Congress to prepare it; then to the whole committee, consisting, in addition, of Roger Sherman and Robert R. Livingston; reportedirmation, not a sentiment, was put forth therein to the world, which had not received the deliberate approbation of such cautious, conservative minds as those of Franklin, John Adams, and Roger Sherman, and of the American People, as well as their representatives in Congress, those of South Carolina and Georgia included. The pr, two years President of the Continental Congress, appointed Minister to Holland, and captured on his way thither by a British cruiser, finally Commissioner with Franklin and Jay for negotiating peace with Great Britain, on the 14th of August, 1776, wrote from Charleston, S. C., to his son, then in England, a letter explaining and
nd State pride, to such an extent that a Convention of delegates from a quorum of the States, called together rather to amend than to supersede the Articles of Confederation, was legally assembled at Philadelphia in 1787, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton,James Madison, Edmund Randolph, and Charles C. Pinckney, being among its most eminent members. John Adams and Thomas Jefferson were absent as Embassadors in Europe. Samuel Adams, George Clinton, and Patrick Henry stood aloof, watching the movement with jealous apprehension. Franklin, then over eighty-one years of age, declined the chair on account of his increasing infirmities; and, on his motion, George Washington was unanimously elected President. The Convention sat with closed doors; and no circumstantial nor adequate report of its deliberations was made. The only accounts of them which have reached us are those of delegates who took notes at the time, or taxed their recollection in after years, when
and Luther Martin, one of the framers of the Constitution; in Delaware, James A. Bayard, Father of one of her present U. S. Senators. afterward in Congress, and Caesar A. Rodney, who became Attorney-General. The Pennsylvania Society had Benjamin Franklin for its President, and Benjamin Rush for Secretary — both signers of the Declaration. This, Franklin, then 84 years of age, signed this memorial on the 3d of February, 1790, and died on the 17th of April following. among other such sociFranklin, then 84 years of age, signed this memorial on the 3d of February, 1790, and died on the 17th of April following. among other such societies, memorialized the first Federal Congress, then sitting at Philadelphia, against Slavery, asking that you will be pleased to countenance the restoration to liberty of those unhappy men who, alone in this land of freedom, are degraded into perpetual bondage, and who, amid the general joy of surrounding freemen, are groaning in servile subjection; that you will devise means for removing this inconsistency of character from the American people; that you will promote mercy and justice towar
tion which it thus sanctions, was unquestionably of all persons of the race of which we are now speaking. The Chief Justice proceeds to defy history and common sense by asserting that, in the days of the fathers, even emancipated blacks were identified in the public mind with the race to which they belonged, and regarded as a part of the slave population rather than the free. He is so kind as to tell the people of the Free States that the efforts of Wesley, and Edwards, and Hopkins, and Franklin, and Jay, and all the other eminent divines, patriots, and statesmen, who appealed to their consciences and their hearts against Slavery as unjust and cruel, had no existence, or, at least, no effect — that Slavery was abolished by our fathers, not at all because it was felt to be wrong, but because it was found to be unprofitable in this particular locality. On this point, he says: (It is very true that, in that portion of the Union where the labor of the negro race was found to be un
at precinct. I knew of many who were in favor of the Union, but who were intimidated by threats, and by the odium attending it, from voting at all. Such was the case at thousands of polls throughout the South, or wherever the Confederates were strong enough to act as their hearts prompted. Mr. Clingman's boast, in the Senate, that free debaters were hanging on trees down his way, was uttered, it should be noted, in December, 1860. And thus it was that several Counties in Tennessee Franklin, Humphreys, Lincoln. gave not a single vote against Secession, while Shelby (including Memphis) gave 7,132 for Secession to five against it, and a dozen others gave respectively 3, 7, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, 20, 23, and 28 votes for the Union to many thousands for Secession. There was only the semblance of an election. If you vote the Union ticket, you must prepare to leave the State, said Senator Mason; and the more reckless and less responsible Secessionists readily translated such w
ty with, 265-266; proposes to guarantee Cuba to Spain, 270; 499. Frankfort, Ky., Secessionists to meet there, 493. Franklin, Benjamin, 35; 42; 107; 255; 385-6. Franklin, Jesse, of N. C., Chairman of Committee on Indiana Territory memorials fFranklin, Jesse, of N. C., Chairman of Committee on Indiana Territory memorials for Slavery, 53. Franklin, T. E., in Peace Conference, 401. Frederick, Md., a constable at, makes an offer to the sheriff of Montreal, 218; the Legislature convenes at, 470; a Union Home Guard organized at, 471. Fredericktown, Mo., Rebels beaFranklin, T. E., in Peace Conference, 401. Frederick, Md., a constable at, makes an offer to the sheriff of Montreal, 218; the Legislature convenes at, 470; a Union Home Guard organized at, 471. Fredericktown, Mo., Rebels beaten at, 591. Free Press, The, 115. Free-Soilers, the, their Convention of 1848, 191; their Platform, 192; Convention of 1852, 223. Free-State Hotel, at Lawrence, destroyed, 244. Frelinghuysen, Theo., for Vice-President, 164. Fremont, Jkens, Gov. Francis W., Of S. C., 347; 410; sends Col. Hayne to Washington, 412; confers with Col. Lamon, 442. Pierce, Franklin, of N. H., nominated for President, 222; elected 224; inaugurated, 224; 226; 227; appoints Reeder Governor of Kansas, 23