Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for Benjamin Franklin or search for Benjamin Franklin in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 16: Webster (search)
course hardly consistent with their dignity. Moreover, Webster did not give his leisure, as many statesmen have done, to writing memoirs or history or to the discussion in book form of some question which interested him. The reason was simple. When Webster was not in office or when he had an interval between the sessions of Congress, he gave his time to the practice of his profession, and great cases before the courts absorbed all his energy. I Daniel Webster was born in Salisbury [now Franklin], New Hampshire, 18 January, 1782, of pioneer stock. A frail child, and therefore spared the hard work of his father's farm, he was sent to Phillips Exeter Academy and to Dartmouth College, from which he graduated in 1800. He taught school as a makeshift, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1805. He practised first at Boscawen and then at Portsmouth, where he rapidly rose to prominence both as lawyer and public speaker. In 1813 he was sent to the House of Representatives as a Fe
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 17: writers on American history, 1783-1850 (search)
upied Sparks's time, but before they began to appear he brought out The life of Gouverneur Morris (1832), in three volumes. In 1834 appeared Volume II of The life and writings of George Washington, and the rest of the twelve volumes followed regularly until the series was complete in 1837. The last to appear was the biography, the first volume in the set. The general verdict of the day was that it was a work worthy of the exalted subject. From 1836 to 1840 was published The works of Benjamin Franklin, in ten volumes, and between 1834 and 1838 came the first series, and between 1844 and 1847 the second series, of The Library of American biography, in all twenty-five volumes. In 1853 he issued The correspondence of the American Revolution, a series of letters to Washington in four volumes. Sparks's letters are full of his greater plan, and he recurred to the idea again and again until he was an old man, but he did not carry out his purpose. In fact, Sparks suffered an eclipse ab
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 22: divines and moralists, 1783-1860 (search)
which soon became a national platform, he was preaching straight at human nature, and touching it with a more and more liberating hand as he advanced in years. From his Seven lectures to young men (1844) to his Evolution and religion (1885) he came a long way. The Lectures are addressed apparently not to young men in general, but to young employees—clerks, mechanics, salesmen, and apprentices. Hence their flavour of Poor Richard and the Industrious Apprentice. Guided to his audience by Franklin and Hogarth, Beecher combines allegory with vivid eighteenth-century realism; bigoted invective against the theatre and novels, with characters, the Sluggard, the Busybody, the Dandy, the Pleasure-Loving Business Man, the Cynic, the Libertine. This antique literary material explains the excessively oldfashioned flavour of the book. Though Beecher grew immeasurably away from it, he seems never to have disavowed or changed it, and for fifty years it remained perhaps his most popular work.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 23: writers of familiar verse (search)
fore Christmas, when all through the house, Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse —could either of these have been composed elsewhere than in New York? And could The truth about Horace have been told with such stern veracity anywhere else than in Chicago? In the first century of the American republic there were only a few large cities, and yet urban amenity was to be discovered here and there in towns where the social organization had advanced beyond its elementary stages. Benjamin Franklin, a pioneer in so many different departments of human endeavour, seems to have been the earliest American to adventure himself among the difficulties of this lighter poetry, so closely akin to prose in its directness and in its seeming lack of effort; and perhaps his lines on Paper could open an American selection of familiar verse only by favouritism. Philip Freneau See Book I, Chap. IX. essayed it more than once; so did Royall Tyler, Ibid. our first writer of comedy; so did John
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
06 Foster, Stephen Collins, 351, 353 Fourier, 188 Fourier Association, 192 Fourteen to one, 388 Fox, Charles James, 93, 95, 96 Fox, George, 14, 42 France, Anatole, 237 Francis, John M., 184 Franconia books, 400 Franklin, Benjamin, 148, 214, 215, 241 Franklin Evans, 262 Fredericksburg, 281 Freedom and War, 216 Freedom Wheeler's controversy with Providence, 373 Free Joe and other Georgian sketches, 352 n. Free Joe and the rest of the world, 352 n. Freeouse, Lord, 141 Woodrow, James, 333, 341 Woods, Leonard, 208 Woolsey, Sarah, 402 Woolson, Constance Fenimore, 381-382 Wordsworth, 13, 38, 248 Work, Henry Clay, 284, 285 Work and play, 213 Working with hands, 324 Works of Benjamin Franklin, the, 117 Works of Poe, 61 n., 65 n. Wound-Dresser, The, 270, 270 n. Wreck of the Hesperus, the, 36 X-ing a Paragrab, 67 Yale, 153, 198, 200, 203, 206, 207, 211 213, 219 Yale review, the, 263 n. Yancey, William L., 288