hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 15 5 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Samuel R. Franklin or search for Samuel R. Franklin in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 6 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 23: destruction of the ram Arkansas.--capture of Galveston.--capture of the Harriet Lane.--sinking of the Hatteras.--attack on Baton Rouge.--Miscellaneous engagements of the gun-boats. (search)
ny objections to them. Buchanan's expedition having forced its way through the narrow and shallow channels with great difficulty, reached Brashear City only to find that a large force of the enemy had crossed over and was making its way up to Franklin. They were immediately followed by the flotilla up the Atchafalaya River, through Bayou Teche to a point five miles above Pattersonville, and three from the mouth of the Teche — where the enemy was found posted in force. The gun-boats opened fld; Acting-Masters' Mate, Loring Cannon; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, D. D. T. Nestell; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. S. Carels; Acting-Engineers, James A. Fox, S. S. Vollum, F. J. Bradley and G. W. Spies. Gun-boat Aroostook. Lieutenant-Commander, Samuel R. Franklin; Lieutenant, T. S. Spencer; Assistant Surgeon, C. J. Cleborne; Assistant Engineers, W. J. Buehler, George R. Holt, James Entwistle and Samuel Gragg; Acting-Masters, Eben Hoyt and W. A. Maine; Acting-Masters' Mates, Louis R. Hamme
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 31: operations of Farragut's vessels on the coast of Texas, etc. (search)
ed only of two 32-pounders, while on the water the Confederates had two steamboats converted into rams. The Army organization consisted of 4,000 men under General Franklin; and Commodore H. H. Bell, who commanded the naval force at New Orleans in the absence of the Flag-officer, detailed Volunteer-Lieutenant Frederick Crocker tibbetts, and steamer Granite City, Acting-Master C. W. Lamson. This force was considered quite sufficient for the purpose intended. It was concerted with General Franklin that the gun-boats should make the first attack alone, led by Lieutenant Crocker, assisted by 180 sharp-shooters divided amongst the vessels, and after driviP. M. on the 8th of September, 1863, twenty-eight hours after the expedition had appeared off the Sabine. A reconnaissance had been made in the morning by Generals Franklin and Weitzel and Lieutenant Crocker. when they decided on a plan of attack. Commodore Bell had sent two good pilots down in the Granite City. At 3 P. M. th
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 34: (search)
nna. Captain, R. B. Hitchcock; Lieutenant-Commander, J. H. Gillis; Surgeon, Joseph Beale; Paymaster, W. H. Thompson; Assistant Surgeon, H. C. Nelson; Captain of Marines, P. R. Fendall; Chief Engineer, George Sewell; Assistant Engineers, J. M. Hobby, James Renshaw, James Butterworth and E. R. Arnold; Acting-Masters, W. L. Churchill and G. B. Livingston; Boatswain, Chas. Miller; Gunner. Wm. Summers; Carpenter, G. M. Doughty; Sailmaker, J. C. Herbert. Steamer Aroostook. Lieutenant-Commander, S. R. Franklin; Lieutenant, T. S. Spencer; Acting-Masters, Eben Hoyt and W. A. Maine; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, W. L. Pynchon; Assistant Engineers, W. G. Buehler, Geo. R. Holt, James Entwistle and Samuel Gragg; Acting-Master's Mates, C. F. Palmer, Louis Hammersley and Edw. Culbert. Steamer Dacotah. Captain, J. P. McKinstry; Lieutenant, G. C. Wiltse; Surgeon, Delavan Bloodgood; Acting Masters, Wm. Earle and W. Moslander; Assistant Paymaster, Richard Washington; Chief Engineer P. G. Pe
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
ar with the general public, on account of the disaster at Ball's Bluff, he was selected to bear the blame of failure. General Stone was perfectly subordinate and desirous to make himself acceptable to General Banks, though he would not lend himself to any of the doubtful proceedings carried on under the eye of the commanding general. General Stone was particularly careful that due courtesy should be paid to tie Navy and all proper requests granted. We think he had the highest respect of Franklin, Emory and A. J. Smith, which is a creditable proof of his capacity. We believe Colonel Clarke did everything in his power to supersede General Stone in General Banks' favor. Clarke, by his own account, was in the advance during the hardest of General Lee's fighting, having joined him with orders to press the fighting. From Lee he returned to General Banks at Pleasant Hill, and gave it as his opinion that Lee was in a dangerous position, at least eight miles from infantry support, in i
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
m. H. Hathorne, W. H. Childs, R. P. Herrick, G. R. Avery and H. Brownell; Fleet Engineer, Wm. H. Shock; Chief Engineer, Thom Williamson; Second-Assistants, E. B. Latch, F. A. Wilson, Isaac DeGraff, C. M. Burchard and John Wilson; Third-Assistants. J. E. Speights, H. L. Pilkington and Alfred Hoyt; Boatswain, Robert Dixon; Gunner, J. L. Staples; Carpenter, O. S. Stimson; Sailmaker, T. C. Herbert. Steamer Pensacola. Commodore, Henry H. Bell, commanding squadron pro tem.; Lieutenant-Commander, Samuel R. Franklin; Lieutenants, F. V. McNair and G. V. Sumner; Surgeon, Wm. Lansdale; Assistant-Surgeon, W. H. Jones; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. H. Stevenson; Marines: First-Lieutenant, Norval L. Nokes; Acting-Masters, F. T. King, Thos. Andrews and S. B. Washburne; Acting-Ensign, V. W. Jones; Engineers: First-Assistant, John Purdy, Jr.; Second-Assistants, A. H. Able and Alfred Colin; Third-Assistants, T. W. Fitch, F. C. Burchard and G. V. Baird; Boatswain, James Herold; Gunner, David Roe;
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
obile, April 12, 1865. Gentlemen — I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication at the hands of Lieutenant-Colonel R. G. Laughlin, of the staff of Major-General Granger, commanding Thirteenth Army Corps, and Lieutenant-Commander S. R. Franklin, United States Navy, of the staff of Admiral Thatcher, demanding the immediate and unconditional surrender of this city. The city has been evacuated by the military authorities, and its municipal authority is now within my control for the services he had rendered during the war, and no officer in the Navy better deserved the honors he had won or the rewards he had reaped. West Gulf Squadron, January 1, 1865. Commodore James S. Palmer. Staff Lieutenant-Commander S. R. Franklin, Fleet-Captain; Fleet-Paymaster, Edward T. Dunn; Fleet-Surgeon, James C. Palmer; Fleet-Engineer, William H. Shock; Assistant-Surgeon, Theoron Woolverton; Acting-Ensigns, Frederick T. Mason, Alex. S. Gibson, T. M. L. Chrystie, Aides