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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 194 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 188 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 168 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 110 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 54 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 49 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 29 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for W. B. Franklin or search for W. B. Franklin in all documents.

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Camp an important change was made in the organization of the army. The divisions of Porter and Sykes were united into the Fifth Corps under Porter, and those of Franklin and Smith into the Sixth Corps under Franklin. On May 19th the movement to Richmond was begun by the advance of Porter and Franklin to Tunstall's Station. reqFranklin. On May 19th the movement to Richmond was begun by the advance of Porter and Franklin to Tunstall's Station. require much imagination, after viewing the results obtained in the face of such conditions, to get a fair measure of these indomitable workers. The story of the way in which these pictures have been rescued from obscurity is almost as romantic a tale as that of their making. The net result of Brady's efforts was a collection of Franklin to Tunstall's Station. require much imagination, after viewing the results obtained in the face of such conditions, to get a fair measure of these indomitable workers. The story of the way in which these pictures have been rescued from obscurity is almost as romantic a tale as that of their making. The net result of Brady's efforts was a collection of over seven thousand pictures (two negatives of each in most cases); and the expenditure involved, estimated at $100,000, ruined him. One set, after undergoing the most extraordinary vicissitudes, finally passed into the Government's possession, where it is now held with a prohibition against its use for commercial purposes. (The
The supplies for the camps farther up the river were hauled along a well-traveled road which bisected this stretch of encampment. This road, called New Kent Road, was the main highway of the region and led to Richmond. A vista of the Federal camp. The Army of the Potomac waiting for the expected victorious advance on the Confederate capital. Yorktown had been evacuated on May 4th and Williamsburg abandoned on May 5th to the Union forces. During the week following, the divisions of Franklin, Sedgwick, Porter, and Richardson, after some opposition, gathered on the banks of the Pamunkey, the southern branch of the York River. Thence they marched toward White House which — after communication with the divisions that had been fighting at Williamsburg, was established — became headquarters for the whole army. This panoramic view shows a part of the encampment. Idle days at Cumberland. The farm-lands occupied by the impatient, waiting army were soon stripped of fences for fi
m, and this was a constant source of anxiety to the commander. He proceeded to transfer all of his men to the Richmond side of the river, excepting the corps of Franklin and Fitz John Porter. About the middle of June, General McCall with a force of eleven thousand men joined the Federal army north of the Chickahominy, bringing teir retreating companions. The stand at Savage's Station Here we see part of the encampment to hold which the divisions of Richardson, Sedgwick, Smith, and Franklin fought valiantly when Magruder and the Confederates fell upon them, June 29, 1862. Along the Richmond & York River Railroad, seen in the picture, the Confederatre wounded at Gaines' Mill on June 27th and removed to the great field-hospital established at Savage's Station. The photograph was taken just before Sumner and Franklin withdrew the rear-guard of their columns on the morning of June 30th. smoke rose lazily through the air, twisting itself among the trees and settling over the
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
o at Stone's River, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, in the Shenandoah campaign of 1864, and at Cold Harbor. 253 killed, 1,240 wounded, 1,581 missing. Second Corps, Maj.-Gen. E. V. Sumner, 187 killed, 1,076 wounded, 848 missing. Third Corps, Maj.-Gen. S. P. Heintzelman, 189 killed, 1,051 wounded, 833 missing. Fourth Corps, Maj.-Gen. E. D. Keyes, 69 killed, 507 wounded, 201 missing. Fifth Corps, Maj.-Gen. Fitz-John Porter, 620 killed, 2,460 wounded, 1,198 missing. Sixth Corps, Maj.-Gen. W. B. Franklin, 245 killed, 1,313 wounded, 1,179 missing. Cavalry, Brig.-Gen. George Stoneman, 19 killed, 60 wounded, 97 missing. Engineer Corps, 2 wounded, 21 missing. Total, 1,734 killed, 8,062 wounded, 6,053 missing. Confed.--Army of Northern Virginia, Gen. R. E. Lee commanding. Losses: Maj.-Gen. Huger's Division, 187 killed, 803 wounded, 360 missing. Maj.-Gen. J. B. Magruder's command, 258 killed, 1,495 wounded, 30 missing. Maj.-Gen. James Longstreet's Division, 763 killed, 3