hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for W. P. Franklin or search for W. P. Franklin in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 7 document sections:

on, Wilcox's and Howard's brigades on the right, supported by part of Porter's brigade and the cavalry under Palmer, and Franklin's brigade of Heintzelman's division, Sherman's brigade of Tyler's division in the centre and up the road, whilst Keyes'so days cooked rations in their haversacks, and commenced the march at half-past 2 A. M. on the 21st., the brigade of Colonel Franklin leading, followed by those of Colonels Wilcox and Howard. At Centreville we found the road filled with troops, and ivision. Report of Colonel Gorman. Headquarters First Minnesota regiment, Washington, D. C., July 24, 1861. Colonel Franklin, Commanding First Brigade Colonel Heintzelman's Division, N. E. Virginia: sir: I have the honor to communicate, a J. H. H. Ward. Headquarters Second brigade, Third Division, camp near Shooter's hill, Monday, July 29, 1661. Col. W. P. Franklin, Commanding Third Division. sir: The temporary command of this brigade having devolved upon me in consequence o
regiments under Col. Porter, with a battalion of the Second, Third, and Eighth regular infantry, a portion of the Second cavalry, and the Fifth Artillery battery, under Col. Burnside; the First and Second Ohio, the Seventy-first New York, and two New Hampshire regiments,with the renowned Rhode Island battery. After Hunter's followed Col. Heintzelman's Division, including the Fourth and Fifth Massachusetts and the First Minnesota regiments, with a cavalry company and a battery, all under Col. Franklin, and the Second, Fourth, and Fifth Maine and Second Vermont regiments under Col. Howard. To about 14,000 men was thus intrusted the difficult and most essential labor of turning the enemy by a circuitous movement on the right, and these troops, as i eventuated, were to experience the larger part of the sanguinary fighting of the day. On the night preceding the battle Gen. Cameron visited the camp, reviewed the Third Tyler brigade, passed a few hours with Gen. McDowell, and then left
collision and blood, because they know well that the first clash between the State and Federal muskets — the first drop of blood that collision spills — will enkindle a flame that will light them on to the accomplishment of their foul, hellish purposes of blood and carnage. This class would, in a mere spirit of adventure, fire the very temples of liberty, and dash into fragments that proudest and noblest monument of human wisdom — the union of these States--the handiwork of Washington, and Franklin, and Madison, and Gerry, and Morris, and comrade conscript fathers — under which we have been the proudest, freest, happiest, greatest nation on the face of the earth. This class does exist in Virginia. It exists all over the civilized earth, and it is no detraction from Virginia to say that it exists within her domain; she would be an exception to all human society, if she did not hold in her bosom such a class. Now all this class will be stimulated by the passage of these revolutionar
by fundamental law, with every officer, from the highest to the lowest, bound by law — this great bulwark of constitutional liberty was the work mainly of Southern hands. Madison is styled the father of it. Not a single pillar in the temple, not a single arch in this great building, was laid, or reared, or constructed, by Northern men. They had able members in the Convention. I detract nothing from their merits. They show forth as great lights in the Revolutionary war. I name but two--Franklin and Hamilton; men of transcendent talents, men of genius; but neither of them contributed any thing to the formation of the Constitution. Mr. Hamilton was for a different model of Government; he was against the form adopted, and actually quit the Convention before it was made. It is true that afterwards, when the Convention was agreed upon and submitted to the people, he lent all the power of his gigantic intellect, and all the fervor of his pure and lofty patriotism, to the establishment
e brave. The staff is made of mahogany, surmounted by a spear head, from which are suspended a red, white, and blue, and red, gold, and black straps and tassels. In the centre of the lance is a silver shield bearing the inscription, Presented to the De Kalb regiment, N. Y. V., by Miss Pauline A. Witthaus, June, 1861. Among the distinguished guests invited were: Gov. E. D. Morgan, Governor Hamilton Fish, Major-General John A. Dix, Brig.-General Yates, the Union Defence Committee, Colonel Franklin, Hon. George Bancroft, Hon. George Folsom, John Jacob Astor, jr., Abiel A. Low, Hon. Edward Pierrepont, Gen. P. M. Wetmore, Hon. Samuel Sloan, Henry Grinnell, Archibald Russell, Capt. M. Cogswell, Col. M. Lefferts, Dr. Alexander B. Mott, Elie Charlier, G. H. Witthaus, Egbert L. Viele, Col. Maidhoff, Col. Tompkins, Major Eaton, Amos F. Eno, Edward Jones, and others. After the presentation the officers of the regiment and the invited guests were invited into the dining-room of Mr. Witt
hose taken prisoners. One was released by Dr. Melcher, who afterward accompanied him to the rebel camp, and saw and conversed with McCulloch, Price, and Rains, and arranged for our wagons returning to gather the wounded and dead. The other surgeon was marched to Springfield before his position was known, when he was set at liberty and passed through our lines. He expressed himself satisfied with the treatment he had received, except being marched twelve miles out of his way. He invited Dr. Franklin and Dr. Davis of the regular hospital to accompany him to the rebel camp, assuring them of good treatment. Among the prisoners taken were ten or fifteen negroes, none of whom, I think, were armed, but simply acting as servants. On the return to Springfield we fell in with Col. Salomon, who said his men had acted badly, and that he could form no idea of the extent of their loss, but knew that it was serious. Had the enemy been at all enterprising, they could have caught hundreds who w
hose taken prisoners. One was released by Dr. Melcher, who afterward accompanied him to the rebel camp, and saw and conversed with McCulloch, Price, and Rains, and arranged for our wagons returning to gather the wounded and dead. The other surgeon was marched to Springfield before his position was known, when he was set at liberty and passed through our lines. He expressed himself satisfied with the treatment he had received, except being marched twelve miles out of his way. He invited Dr. Franklin and Dr. Davis of the regular hospital to accompany him to the rebel camp, assuring them of good treatment. Among the prisoners taken were ten or fifteen negroes, none of whom, I think, were armed, but simply acting as servants. On the return to Springfield we fell in with Col. Salomon, who said his men had acted badly, and that he could form no idea of the extent of their loss, but knew that it was serious. Had the enemy been at all enterprising, they could have caught hundreds who w