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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for A. T. Freeman or search for A. T. Freeman in all documents.

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art taken by the Third regiment Michigan volunteers in the battle of Fredericksburgh, December thirteenth, 1862. In accordance with brigade order, this regiment broke camp December eleventh, at six o'clock A. M., and occupied the position assigned it in the brigade. After crossing the river, December thirteenth, the regiment marched nearly one mile down the river and was ordered to halt and lie down. After remaining in this position nearly fifteen minutes, I received an order from Lieutenant Freeman of General Berry's staff, directing me to move the regiment to the front and support battery C, Fifth U. S. artillery, which was at that time hotly engaged with the enemy. Upon arriving at the battery I formed my line of battle in its rear, my right resting upon a road running at right angles with my line. I then directed the men to lie down, where they remained nearly an hour. An attempt being then made by the enemy to capture the battery, I moved the regiment nearly ten rods in fr
m, Lieutenant W. R. McChesney, and Lieutenant H. S. Parks--I owe especial thanks for the manner they served upon the field, conveying my orders wherever required through a hail-storm of shot, shells, and bullets, regardless of all save the performance of their duty. During the conflict, it being necessary, in the absence of staff-officers on duty, to make use of orderlies to supply their places, in connection herewith I take great pleasure in testifying to the brave conduct of orderlies A. T. Freeman and Abijah Lee of my escort. Amid the glorious results of a battle won, it gives me pain to record the names of the gallant men who offered up their lives on the altar of their country. But we must drop the tear of sorrow o'er their resting-places and offer our heartfelt sympathies to their relatives and friends, trusting that God will care for them and soothe their afflictions. And while we remember the noble dead, let us pay a tribute of respect to the gallant Colonel T. D. Willia
d constancy of the latter. Gen. Sherman exhibited his usual activity and enterprise; Gen. Morgan proved his tactical skill and strategic talent; while Generals Steele, Smith, Osterhaus, and Stuart, and the several brigade commanders, displayed the fitting qualities of brave and successful officers. The members of my staff present--Col. Stewart, Chief of Cavalry; Lieut.-Col. Schwartz, Inspector General; Lieut.-Colonel Dunlap, A. Q.M.; Major McMillen, Medical Director; Major Ramsey; Captain Freeman, and Lieutenants Jones, Caldwell and Jayne, Aids-de-camp — all rendered valuable assistance. Lieut. Caldwell, who ascended into the top of a lofty tree in full view of the enemy and within range of his fire, and gave me momentary information of the operations both of our land and naval forces and of the enemy, particularly challenges my commendation and thanks. To Col. Parsons, A. Q.M., and master of transports, I also offer my acknowledgments, not only for the successful discharge
the rebels of fifteen killed, including two captains and one lieutenant, six wounded, and taken, including a major, and twelve prisoners. The total number of prisoners taken here and by Stanley is about seventy; among them several officers. Captain Freeman, of Freeman's battery, (rebel,) is among the killed. Federal loss here four killed, four wounded, and three missing, all belonging to the Fortieth Ohio. A reconnoissance from the front has just returned, and the rebels have disappeared. prisoners taken here and by Stanley is about seventy; among them several officers. Captain Freeman, of Freeman's battery, (rebel,) is among the killed. Federal loss here four killed, four wounded, and three missing, all belonging to the Fortieth Ohio. A reconnoissance from the front has just returned, and the rebels have disappeared. Most of the prisoners taken here belong to the Twenty-eighth Mississippi mounted infantry. Many of those captured by Stanley are Tennesseeans. occasional.